Live Blog: Thursday’s City Council Meetings (April 11)

This is a live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, April 11. It’s not the official minutes.

Both meetings are being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and can also be watched online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

6:15 p.m.

The workshop has started.

6:25 p.m.

The council discussed its calendar, future agenda items and received committee reports.

Continue reading “Live Blog: Thursday’s City Council Meetings (April 11)”

Live Blog: Thursday’s City Council Meetings (March 28)

This is a live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, March 28. It’s not the official minutes.

Both meetings are being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and can also be watched online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

6:07 p.m.

The workshop has started.

6:08 p.m.

Simpson named city manager

Frank SimpsonThe council unanimously voted to select Frank Simpson as city manager. Simpson was named interim city manager in January when David Neeley retired. He had served as deputy city manager since 2011, overseeing  Public Works, Water Services, and the Electric Utility. Simpson came to the City of College Station after serving as city manager of Missouri City for seven years (2004-11). He previously served as city manager of Webster (2001-04) and Center (1995-01), and was an assistant city manager in La Marque (1994-95).

Simpson began his long municipal government career as a public utilities worker for the City of College Station in 1986 while attending Texas A&M. He earned a bachelor’s degree in political science in 1988 and a master’s in public administration from A&M in 1990. Simpson worked in various administrative capacities with the City of College Station from 1989-93. He and his wife, Kelly, have three children.

Continue reading “Live Blog: Thursday’s City Council Meetings (March 28)”

Live Blog: Thursday’s City Council Meetings (Feb. 28)

This is a live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Feb. 28. It’s not the official minutes.

Both meetings are being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and can also be watched online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

6:13 p.m.

The workshop meeting has started.

6:16 p.m.

Mayor Nancy Berry proclaimed March as National Nutrition Month with a presentation to the Mid East Texas Dietetic Association (METDA). Pictured below with the mayor (right) is Meghan Windham, president-elect of METDA. Continue reading “Live Blog: Thursday’s City Council Meetings (Feb. 28)”

Five things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

gavel[1]Here are five items to watch when the College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (6 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings:

  1. State of Police Department Update: The council will hear Police Chief Jeff Capps’ annual report on the state of the Police Department, including a review of the city’s 2012 crime statistics. Continue reading “Five things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings”

Mental health facility will fill community void

Jim Shaheen of SBH addresses local officials at Tuesday's groundbreaking.
Jim Shaheen of SBH addresses local officials at Tuesday’s groundbreaking.

If you happened to drive past the groundbreaking ceremony for the new mental health facility Tuesday morning, you might have noticed a significant number of law enforcement personnel in attendance.

No, the governor wasn’t speaking and we weren’t there for security. Representatives from all our local public safety agencies were there to offer our wholehearted support to the new Strategic Behavioral Health hospital, which will fill a vital need in our area when it opens early next year.

In my 20 years with the College Station Police Department, we’ve dealt with countless numbers of people suffering from mental health issues. Our officers are trained to deal with these situations, but they aren’t mental health professionals. Many of these individuals end up in jail or are taken to the nearest emergency room when proper treatment could have relieved or prevented the situation.

Through our daily experiences, law enforcement officers genuinely understand the struggles mental illness creates for families. Most of the time, these individuals are able to cope with their illnesses, but any number of things can trigger a crisis. If proper intervention, treatment and support systems are available, the patient usually gets better. 

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