Posts tagged “outside agency funding

Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Oct. 12)

Back (L-R): Linda Harvell, Jerome Rektorik, James Benham, Barry Moore. Front (L-R): Blanche Brick, Mayor Karl Mooney, Julie Schultz.

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Oct. 12. It’s not the official minutes.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Channels 19 and 119 (HD), or online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

6:31 p.m.

The workshop has started. Council took no action on items discussed in executive session.

6:38 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled these consent items for workshop discussion:

  • Investment Policy: The Public Funds Investment Act requires an annual review and approval of the city’s investment policy and investment strategies. The act further requires that the governing body adopt a written instrument by rule, order, ordinance, or resolution stating that it has reviewed the investment policy and investment strategies and that the written instrument so adopted records any changes to either the investment policy or investment strategies. The City of College Station adopted an irrevocable OPEB trust on Sept. 11 and added to the investment strategy is the investment guideline for this trust.
  • Rio Grande Subdivision Parking Removal: This ordinance removes on-street parking on the northeast side of Little River Street beginning at the intersection of Harvey Mitchell Parkway South and extending 175 feet northwest to the intersection with a private alley.
  • Cordova Ridge Subdivision Parking Removal: This ordinance removes on-street parking on the northwest side of Cordova Ridge Court beginning at the intersection of Renee Lane and extending 640 feet southwest into its cul-de-sac.

7:05 p.m.

Water Conservation Update

The council heard a presentation by Texas A&M Professor Ron Kaiser, who has developed diagnostics to estimate how much water has been saved by local water conservation efforts. Kaiser provided a summary of significant achievements and ongoing programs.

He said the BVWaterSmart website and weekly notifications have played a significant role in reducing the amount of water wasted by overwatering landscapes.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:08 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar and received committee reports. The regular meeting will start after a short break.

7:18 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

7:24 p.m.

Municipal Courts Week

Mayor Mooney proclaimed Nov. 6-10 as Municipal Courts Week to recognize the importance of municipal courts, the rule of law, and the fair and impartial administration of justice. Pictured below with Mayor Mooney are Municipal Court Judge Ed Spillane and the municipal court staff.

7:28 p.m.

Fill the Boot for MDS

Mayor Mooney recognized the College Station Fire Department for its participation in the recent Fill the Boot for Muscular Dystrophy event. Mooney proclaimed Oct. 26-28 as Fill The Boot Days in College Station. For more than 60 years, Fill the Boot has been a national firefighter tradition that gives hope and support to families affected by muscular dystrophy. Pictured below with Mayor Mooney are representatives of the College Station Fire Department.

7:37 p.m.

Hear Visitors

One person spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens might address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda. John Ellison spoke about the poor behavior he frequently witnesses on weekends in Northgate.

7:38 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • Renewal of a not-to-exceed $150,000 contract with Hilltop Securities for financial advisory services.
  • A $25,000 funding agreement with the Memorial for all Veterans of the Brazos Valley and its annual budget.
  • A $350,000 funding agreement with the Research Valley Partnership.
  • A $15,000 funding agreement with the College Station Noon Lions Club.
  • A $390,868 funding agreement with the Arts Council of Brazos Valley for art and tourism marketing.
  • A $25,000 funding agreement with the Bryan/College Station Chamber of Commerce and its annual budget.
  • A $114,376 funding agreement with Easterwood Airport and its annual budget.
  • A $325,000 funding agreement with the Arts Council of Brazos Valley and its annual budget.
  • A $2,280,236 tri-party funding agreement with the Brazos Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau and its annual budget. College Station’s share is $1,846,991 and Bryan’s is $433,245.
  • A $49,190 funding agreement with Keep Brazos Beautiful.
  • Estimated awards totaling $130,000 to CC Creations ($65,000) and M&M Apparel ($65,000) for city-branded uniforms.
  • A $400,000 funding agreement with the Brazos Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau to administer its grant program.
  • A $3.29 million contract with Elliott Construction for the Eastgate Rehab PH IV
  • Project.
  • A $301,495 contract with Binkley & Barfield for engineering services related to the preliminary design of the Greens Prairie Road and Greens Prairie Trail projects.
  • A $258,200 contract with Freese and Nichols for the Drainage Capital Plan.
  • A resolution stating that the city council has reviewed and approved the city’s investment policy, broker-dealer list, and investment strategy.
  • Annual water meter purchases estimated to be $166,078.27 from Aqua Metric Sales Company through the Houston-Galveston Area Council contract.
  • Removed parking on the northeast side of Little River Street beginning at the intersection with Harvey Mitchell Parkway South and extending 175 feet northwest to the intersection with a private alley.
  • Removed parking on the northwest side of Cordova Ridge Court beginning at the intersection with Renee Lane and extending 640 feet southwest into its cul-de-sac.
  • An amendment removing contradictory language from a Community Development Block Grant funding contract with Brazos Valley Community Action Programs for affordable rental activity at 1112 Waynesboro Ct.
  • An amendment removing contradictory language from a Community Development Block Grant funding contract with Twin City Mission for affordable rental activity at 2404 Blanco Dr.
  • An ordinance amendment to allow the CSPD SWAT team to have key box access.

7:58 p.m.

Northpoint Crossing Modification

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to modify the concept plan of the existing Planned Development District at Northpoint Crossing. The change will reduce the width of sidewalks along Northpoint Crossing Drive to allow for the redesign of head-in parking and improve site identification and wayfinding.

Here are the PowerPoint presentations:

9:22 p.m.

Arrington Road Thoroughfare Alignment

After a public hearing, the council voted 5-2 to approve a request to realign a future minor collector with Harpers Ferry Road at the intersection with Arrington Road. Councilwomen Blanche Brick and Linda Harvell voted against the motion. Brazos County is reconstructing a portion of Arrington and requested the Thoroughfare Plan amendment to improve safety and efficiency in the corridor.

An earlier motion to delay the vote until additional information could be obtained failed by a 5-2 vote. Brick and Harvell supported that motion.

Here are the PowerPoint presentations:

9:22 p.m.

The council is taking a short break.

9:32 p.m.

The meeting has resumed.

10:38 p.m.

Roadway Impact Fee Collection Rate

After a public hearing, the council voted 5-2 against reducing the roadway impact fee collection rate to zero. Councilwoman Julie Schultz and Councilman James Benham voted for the motion. The action would have reduced anticipated revenue for roadway capital improvement projects by about $12 million over the next decade.

The council adopted the one-time fees last year on new development to help mitigate the estimated $134 million in capital improvements needed in the next 10 years. Maximum fees were adopted with a lower collection rate phased in over a three-year period, with the initial fees scheduled to start Dec. 1. The adopted collection rate is about 9 percent of the maximum identified by state law.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

11:00 p.m.

Parkland Dedication Comp Plan Amendments

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to amend the city’s Comprehensive Plan to revise neighborhood and community park zones.

The amendments change neighborhood park zones to no longer include College Station’s extraterritorial jurisdiction and to combine some of the zones. The changes also reduce community park zones from four areas to two by combining Zones A & B into one zone west of Highway 6 and combining Zones C & D into another zone east of Highway 6.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

11:30 p.m.

Parkland Dedication UDO Revisions

After a public hearing, the council voted for staff to bring back reworded revisions to the city’s Unified Development Ordinance regarding the broader use of Parkland Dedication Fees.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

11:39 p.m.

The council discussed and reviewed future agenda items.

11:39 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the meeting. The council meets again on Thursday, Oct. 26.

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Oct. 13)

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Oct. 13. It’s not the official minutes.

The meeting is being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and streamed online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:20 p.m.

The workshop has started.

5:55 p.m.

Legislative Update

The council received a legislative update and a preview of the upcoming session of the Texas Legislature.  

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:07 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled this consent item for workshop discussion:

  • College View School Zone: The proposed 30 mph school zone would be near the new College View High School. It will extend from 200 feet east of Holik Street to about 175 feet west of Timber Street. The zone also extends south along Timber about 160 feet from the intersection with George Bush Drive and north along Bizzell Street about 100 feet from the intersection. Holik Street will also have the 30 mph zone from the end of the existing zone to the intersection with Bush. Texas A&M has given the city permission to install and maintain a flashing beacon on Bizzell to notify motorists coming from campus that they are about to enter a school zone.
  • RVP Funding Agreement: As part of the FY17 budget process, the council approved $350,000 from the general fund for the operations and maintenance of the Research Valley Partnership. Councilman James Benham reiterated his opposition to funding the RVP.
  • ESRI Agreement: The ESRI Small Government Enterprise Licenses Agreement allows the city to use most ESRI products without limits on the number of licenses. The three-year contract has an annual cost of $50,000 and saves money when compared to acquiring the appropriate number of individual licenses and paying for annual maintenance and support agreements.
  • Chamber of Commerce Funding: The Bryan/College Station Chamber of Commerce will receive $25,000 in hotel tax funds in FY17. Councilman Benham thanked retiring executive director Royce Hickman for his service.

7:20 p.m.

Roadway Impact Fees

The council discussed the Impact Fee Advisory Committee’s written comments about possible roadway impact fees and heard an update on the process for implementation.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:20 p.m.

The mayor suspended the workshop until after the regular meeting, which will begin momentarily.

7:31 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

7:34

Hear Visitors

One person spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens may address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda. Ben Roper recognized Army Spc. Robert Asiaga as part of the Fallen Heroes Memorial program.

7:38 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • A $179,760.87 change order for the contract with L.E. Myers Company for additional matting and track equipment due to extreme wet weather conditions on the Spring Creek transmission line upgrade project.
  • A contract not to exceed $750,000 with McCord Engineering for electric engineering services related to the design of the Graham Road Substation.
  • The second renewal of a blanket price agreement not to exceed $136,992 with Cleveland Asphalt Products for emulsified asphalt products for street maintenance. 
  • Renewal of a one-year contract not to exceed $200,000 with Rios Tree Service for landscaping, tree trimming and removal services.
  • A 30 mph school zone on George Bush Drive, Timber Street, Holik Street and Bizzell Street near the new College View High School.
  • Annual water meter purchases of $166,077.52 from Aqua Metric Sales through the Houston-Galveston Area Council contract.
  • The first of two renewal options for the annual EMS supply purchase order not to exceed $80,000 with Boundtree Medical L.L.C.
  • An FY17 funding agreement for $15,000 with the College Station Noon Lions Club.
  • The FY17 budget, a general fund funding agreement for $35,000, and a hotel tax fund funding agreement for $91,000 with the Arts Council of the Brazos Valley.
  • FY17 hotel tax affiliate funding and a marketing and public arts support funding agreement for $391,900 with the Arts Council of the Brazos Valley.
  • A FY17 funding agreement for $51,190 with Keep Brazos Beautiful.
  • The FY17 budget and a hotel tax funding agreement for $25,000 with the Memorial for all Veterans of the Brazos Valley.
  • The FY17 budget and a hotel tax funding agreement for $2,122,616 with the Bryan-College Station Convention and Visitors Bureau.
  • The FY17 budget a hotel tax funding agreement for $25,000 with the Bryan/College
  • Station Chamber of Commerce.
  • The FY17 budget and a funding agreement for $102,690 with Easterwood Airport.
  • A FY17 hotel tax grant program funding agreement of $400,000 with the Brazos Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau.
  • A $150,000, three-year Small Government Enterprise ArcGIS License agreement with ESRI.

The council voted separately on this consent item:

  • By a 6-1 vote approved a FY17 general fund funding agreement for $350,000 with the Research Valley Partnership. Councilman Benham voted against the motion.

8:06 p.m.

Capstone-Barron Realignment

The council voted unanimously to move forward with the reconstruction and alignment of Capstone Drive and Barron Road from Fitch Parkway through Wellborn Road. Barron and Capstone will be realigned to intersect Wellborn Road, and the existing asphalt road will be replaced with concrete.

The $5.6 million project was approved in the FY16 city budget and was among the projects recommended by the 2015 Citizen Advisory Committee.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:09 p.m.

Capstone-Barron Project Easements and Right-of-Way

The council voted unanimously to authorize city staff to negotiate the purchase of right-of-way and easements for the Capstone-Barron Realignment Project.

8:14 p.m.

Wellborn SUD Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the zoning from Rural to Wellborn Commercial for the Wellborn Special Utility District office, which is located on three acres northeast of the Greens Prairie Road West-Live Oak Street intersection.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:29 p.m.

Tarrow Townhomes Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the zoning from Office to Planned Development District for about 1.6 acres at the intersection of Tarrow Street and Autumn Circle. The change will allow the development of townhouses.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:32 p.m.

Parking Removal on Louise and Second Street

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to remove parking along one side of the 300 block of Louise Street and the 400 block of Second Street to allow aerial fire department access to the proposed Louise Townhomes development.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:35 p.m.

Easement Abandonment at A&M Church of Christ

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to abandon part of a public utility easement on the A&M Church of Christ property at 2475 Rudder Freeway.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

10:01 p.m.

Northgate Mobile Food Court

The council voted 5-2 to approve a conditional use permit for a long-term mobile food court at 203 First Street in the Northgate District. Beer and wine sales must cease at midnight and a minimum of two security officers must be provided from 10 p.m.-3 a.m. on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays. 

Councilmen Steve Aldrich and Karl Mooney voted against the motion.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

10:01 p.m.

The council is taking a short break.

10:07 p.m.

The meeting has resumed.

10:09 p.m.

Easement Abandonment at School Sites

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to abandon part of a public utility easement near the Willow Branch and Oakwood school sites.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

10:11 p.m.

Summit Crossing Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the zoning from Planned Development District to Townhouse for about 14.6 acres north of Harvey Road and west of FM 158. The change will allow the continuation of the existing Summit Crossing townhouse development.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

10:13 p.m.

Easement Abandonment on Redmond Drive

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to abandon a public utility easement to accommodate the design of a residential development on Redmond Drive.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

10:14 p.m.

BioCorridor Board Appointment

The council voted unanimously to appoint Johnny Burns to replace Barry Moore as one of the Planning & Zoning Commission’s representatives on the BioCorridor Board. Moore resigned to run for city council.

10:15 p.m.

BVSWMA Board Appointment

The council voted 6-0 to appoint Mayor Pro Tem John Nichols to the BVSWMA, Inc. Board of Directors. Nichols abstained. Mayor Nancy Berry’s term on the board expired Sept. 30.

10:15 p.m.

The mayor adjourned the regular meeting. The workshop meeting will resume.

10:18 p.m.

The mayor adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar, future agenda items, and committee reports.

The council meets again on Thursday, Oct. 27.


14316755_10108798313965164_2904942172107966680_nAbout the Author

@ColinKillian has been with the City of College Station since 2010. He previously served 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

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By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (5:30 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:

  1. Roadway Impact Fees: In the workshop, the council will discuss the Impact Fee Advisory Committee’s written comments regarding possible roadway impact fees and will hear an update on the process for implementation.
  2. College View School Zone: As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider adding a 30 mph school zone on George Bush Drive, Timber Street, Holik Street and Bizzell Street near the new College View High School.
  3. Outside Agency Funding: The consent agenda also includes formal funding agreements with several outside agencies. The agreements – some funded by the general fund and others with hotel tax revenue — were tentatively approved last month as part of the FY17 city budget.
  4. Capstone-Barron Realignment: After a public hearing, the council will discuss the reconstruction and alignment of Capstone Drive and Barron Road from Fitch Parkway through Wellborn Road. Barron and Capstone will be realigned to intersect Wellborn Road, and a concrete road will replace the existing asphalt. The $5.6 million project was approved in the FY16 city budget and recommended by the 2015 Citizen Advisory Committee.
  5. Mobile Food Court: After a public hearing, the council will consider a conditional use permit for a long-term mobile food court at 203 First Street in Northgate. The site plan includes pads and utilities for up to nine vendors, along with a permanent concessions/restroom building.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Ch. 19, or online. The website includes an archive of previous council meetings. We’ll post a detailed live blog on this site.

Related links:                                                                 


Colin KillianAbout the Author

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian)has been with the City of College Station since 2010. He previously served 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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Council reviews proposed budget during workshops

Budget4

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council had its final workshop about the proposed FY17 city budget on Tuesday at the CSU Meeting and Training Facility. The session primarily covered the city’s funding of outside agencies and the hotel tax fund. 

The Fiscal Year 2017 proposed net budget for the City of College Station totals $341 million for all funds, which includes $217.47 million for operations and maintenance and $108 million for capital projects.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

First, my apologies for not posting a blog from Monday’s initial budget workshop. I had to be out-of-town. Before we go into the details of today’s workshop, I’ll briefly recap Monday’s discussion of the general fund, tax rate, and road maintenance fee.

Monday’s Recap

The General Fund accounts for city activities typically considered governmental functions, including Police and Fire, Public Works, Parks and Recreation, and Planning and Development Services. Also included are the primary support services for these areas such as Fiscal Services, Information Technology, and administrative services in General Government.

Proposed FY17 General Fund revenues are $78.1 million, an 11.8 percent increase.

The total net taxable certified value of property in the City of College Station for 2016 is about $7.99 billion, an increase of 11.9 percent from 2015. The increase in value is due in part to $284 million in new construction and development being added to the tax rolls. Existing property values increased by 7.9 percent over 2015.

The FY17 Proposed Budget includes a tax rate of 47.25 cents per $100 assessed valuation, which includes 27.7161 cents for operations and maintenance and 19.5339 cents for debt service. That marks a two-cent increase from the FY16 rate of 45.25. For the owner of a $175,000 home, the new rate would raise the monthly tax bill by less than $3.

Based on the final property value numbers received – the effective tax rate for FY17 is 42.4282 cents. The effective tax rate is the rate that will raise the same revenues as last year on the same properties. The rollback tax rate of 47.2820 cents is the highest that can be adopted before citizens can initiate a petition to lower it back to the rollback rate.

The average tax rate for Texas cities with populations from 75,000-150,000 is about 58 cents. The 10 fastest-growing non-suburbs – excluding College Station – average about 59 cents. The City of Bryan has a tax rate of 62.9 cents, along with a monthly street improvement fee.

The budget also includes a proposed $10 roadway maintenance fee for residential utility customers. The fee would generate about $4 million each year for street and road maintenance, which was cited as a top priority in a recent survey of city residents.   

On Tuesday, the council focused on outside agency funding and the hotel tax fund.

Outside Agency Funding

Total proposed FY16 outside agency funding is $4.46 million. Requested from the General Fund is $1.25 million for these agencies:

  • Research Valley Partnership: $350,000 (operations).
  • Arts Council of Brazos Valley: $35,000 (operations).
  • Noon Lions Club: $15,000 (Fourth of July celebration).
  • Aggieland Humane Society: $235,000 (operations).
  • Brazos County Health District: $326,500 (operations).
  • Brazos Central Appraisal District: $288,661 (operations).

Requested from the Hotel Occupancy Tax Fund is $3.16 million:

  • B-CS Convention & Visitors Bureau: $2,122,616 (operations).
  • B-CS CVB Grant Program: $400,000.
  • Easterwood Airport Advertising: $102,690.
  • Arts Council of Brazos Valley: $91,000 (operations)
  • Arts Council of Brazos Valley: $348,400 (affiliate funding/marketing)
  • Arts Council of Brazos Valley: $43,500 (marketing/public support)
  • Veterans Memorial: $25,000 (development of Civil War memorial).
  • B-CS Chamber of Commerce: $25,000.

Keep Brazos Beautiful requested $51,190 from the Sanitation Fund.

Hotel Tax Fund     

The hotel tax allows the city to collect up to its current rate of 7 percent on rental income of hotels and motels in the city limits.Hotel tax funds can only be spent on specific items that promote tourism.

The FY17 budgeted hotel tax revenue is $5.4 million, a 2.5 percent increase from FY16. Hotel tax revenues are expected to increase due to a solid tourism economy and the addition of several hotels. Total city operating expenditures in the Hotel Tax Fund are increased by 36.4 percent to about $7.4 million, which includes two additional synthetic fields at Veterans Park and provides improvements to existing fields.

About $1.7 million is proposed for the initial phase of the Southeast Park project, and $690,000 is budgeted for the fourth preferred access payment to the Convention & Visitors Bureau for the use ofTexas A&M’s athletic facilities.

Court and Police Seizure Funds

The College Station Municipal Court collects a number of special fees authorized by the state legislature. These fees are the court technology fee, court security fee, efficiency time payment fee, juvenile case manager fee and the truancy prevention fee. Other fees collected specifically for child safety are collected in the General Fund and are used to pay for school crossing guards. These fees are paid by those who pay tickets at College Station Municipal Court.

The Police Seizure Fund accounts for items received through the Police Department as a result of criminal investigations. These funds are used for one-time equipment and other purchases to assist in police activities. Police Seizure Fund revenues are estimated to be $20,401 in FY17 with proposed expenditures of $20,000.

Cemetery Fund

The Memorial Cemetery Fund is a special fund that accounts for two-thirds of the sales of cemetery lots and other revenues through the Memorial Cemetery, which includes the Aggie Field of Honor. For FY17, proposed revenue earnings are $257,004.

Other Special Revenue Funds

  • Wolf Pen Creek TIF Fund: Accounts for ad valorem tax and other revenues that are accrued to the WPC Tax Increment Finance District. The fund also accounts for expenditures on projects that take place in the WPC District.
    • Fund Balance – $1.27 million
    • Expenditures – $5,000
  • West Medical District TIRZ No. 18: Established in December 2012, the West Medical District Tax Increment Refinance Zone encompasses the area near the State Highway 6-Rock Prairie Road Bridge and includes The Med and Scott & White Hospital. Development in this portion of the district is expected to meet or exceed $117 million over a 20-year period, which would yield about $8.4 million in tax proceeds. The funds will be used to support the required improvement projects.
    • Revenue: $230,135 – tax revenue and interest earnings
    • Expenditures: $0
  • East Medical District  TIRZ No. 19: Established in December 2012, the East Medical District TIRZ encompasses the area east of the State Highway 6-Rock Prairie Road Bridge and includes most of the district’s undeveloped properties. Development projects include Rock Prairie Road East, Barron Road, Lakeway Drive, potable water, fire flow water supply, greenway trails, sanitary sewer service, and other public works. New development is expected to meet or exceed $283 million over a 20-year period, which would yield about $30.8 million in tax proceeds. The funds will be used to fund the required improvement projects.
    • Revenue: $2,971 – tax revenue and interest earnings
    • Expenditures: $0
  • Public, Education and Government Access Channel Fee Fund: PEG funds are collected in an amount equal to one percent of Suddenlink Media’s gross revenues, per a new state franchise agreement that replaced a 10-year-old local franchise agreement. These funds, collected quarterly, may be used for educational and governmental broadcasting on Channel 19.
    • Revenue – $201,000 – cable franchise fees and interest earnings
    • Expenditures: $143,640
  • R.E. Meyer Estate Restricted Gift Fund: When Robert Earl “Bob” Meyer passed away in October 2013, he generously bequeathed 25 percent of his estate to the College Station Parks and Recreation Department with the gift restricted for the benefit of senior adult programs.

Electric Fund

The electric utility provides for the construction of new facilities needed to extend electrical service to new consumers, performs repairs and maintenance to the electric system, and installs and maintains street and traffic lights. Electric utility employees maintain over 20 miles of electric transmission lines, seven electrical substations, and more than 450 miles of overhead and underground electric distribution lines.

A one percent decrease in electric rates is proposed in the FY17 budget. Revenues of $102 million are projected with operating expenditures of $73.4 million and non-operating expenditures of about $31 million, which includes $16.8 million in capital projects.

Water Fund

As a city enterprise, the full cost of service for water production, transmission and distribution is recovered by charging customers for consumption on a per unit basis. 

No water rate increase is included in the FY17 budget. Revenues of $15.8 million are projected with operating expenditures of $8.2 million, non-operating expenditures of about $9.2 million, and $8.7 million in capital projects.

Wastewater Fund

Wastewater services are provided as an enterprise function with service-related fees paying for the cost of service. 

An eight percent increase in wastewater rates is included in the FY16 budget. Revenues of $16.7 million are projected with operating expenditures of $7.1 million, non-operating expenditures of about $13.2 million, and $14.4 million in capital projects.

Sanitation Fund

The Sanitation Division of Public Works serves the city’s solid waste collection needs, including curbside recycling, brush and grass clipping collection, street sweeping, removal of waste and the provision of residential containers. Commercial services are also provided to local businesses.

No sanitation rate increase is included in the FY17 budget. Revenues of $9.6 million are projected with operating expenditures of $9 million and non-operating expenditures of about $867,000 million.

Drainage Fund

Like all the city’s enterprise funds, the goal of the drainage fund is to provide a quality service at a reasonable cost. No rate increase is included in the FY17 budget, which projects expenditures of about $1.8 million.

Northgate Parking Fund

The Northgate Parking Fund accounts for parking operations in the Northgate District, including the surface parking lot on Patricia Street, the College Main Parking Garage and on-street parking. Revenues of $1.4 million are projected with operating expenditures of $1.3 million.

Internal Service Funds

The City of College Station is partially self-insured for property, casualty and general liability, workers compensation and unemployment compensation. The city became self-funded for employee and dependent health care in January 2004. The current program is administered by Blue Cross/Blue Shield. These insurance funds are accounted for as Internal Service Funds.

  • Property & Casualty Insurance: $1.12 million in expenditures and transfers.
  • Employee Benefits Fund: $12.7 million in expenditures and transfers.
  • Workers Compensation Insurance: $678,000 in expenditures and transfers.
  • Unemployment Insurance Fund: $50,000 in expenditures.

Equipment Replacement Fund

The Equipment Replacement Fund is an internal service fund that provides equipment and fleet replacements. The FY17 budget projects about $6.2 million in expenditures and revenues of $6.6 million.

Fleet Maintenance Fund

The Fleet Maintenance Fund is an Internal Service Fund that receives revenue based on expected costs of departmental transportation and uses those funds to pay for maintaining the city’s fleet of vehicles. The FY17 budget projects about $2.1 million in expenditures and revenues of $2.2 million.

Utility Customer Service

The Utility Customer Service Fund is an Internal Service Fund that accounts for expenses associated with reading electric and water meters, completing connect and disconnect requests, and providing customer service activities including billing and collections for electric, water, wastewater, sanitation, and drainage utilities.

The FY17 budget projects about $2.8 million in expenditures and revenues of $2.65 million.

What’s Ahead?

A public hearing on the proposed tax rate of 47.25 is scheduled for 7 p.m. on August 31 at city hall. A public hearing on the budget and tax rate will be at 7 p.m. on Sept. 8 at city hall. Budget adoption is set for Sept. 22.


Colin KillianAbout the Author

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian)has been with the City of College Station since 2010. He previously served 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


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Five things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (5:30 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:

  1. Recycling Update: The council will hear a workshop presentation about recycling collection and an update on city’s recent single-stream recycling pilot project. On the consent agenda, the council will consider a five-year, $840,283 contract and franchise agreement with Brazos Valley Recycling. Staff is not recommending a rate increase for customers.
  2. Student Government Association: The council will hear a presentation from Texas A&M’s student body president on the primary goals of the Student Government Association. The city and SGA are working together on a number of mutually beneficial endeavors.
  3. Science Park Agreement: As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider a 10-year, performance-based economic development agreement with the College Station Science Park. The strategy is to create additional shovel-ready sites to take advantage of A&M’s recent commercialization efforts.
  4. Outside Agency Funding: The council will consider funding agreements with the Arts Council of Brazos Valley, B-CS Chamber of Commerce, College Station Noon Lions Club, Aggieland Humane Society, B-CS Convention and Visitors Bureau, Keep Brazos Beautiful, the Research Valley Partnership and the Memorial for All Veterans of the Brazos Valley.
  5. Mobile Food Courts: After a public hearing, the council will consider allowing food vendors to develop short- and long-term mobile food courts through conditional use permits and the site planning process.

(more…)