Posts tagged “parkland

Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (July 9)

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular teleconference meetings on Thursday, July 9. It’s not the official minutes.

The meetings are streamed live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and at cstx.gov/cstv19. To join online, go to Zoom or call 888-475-4499 and enter meeting number 997 0027 4418. Public comments will be allowed through Zoom.

5:55 p.m.

The workshop has started. No action was taken out of executive session.

5:56 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council pulled no items for discussion from the regular meeting’s consent agenda.

6:24 p.m.

Parkland Expansion

The council voted unanimously to support the conversion of about 196 acres of greenways to parkland. The Parks & Recreation Advisory Board unanimously passed the motion in June.

Here’s the PowerPoint Presentation:

6:28 p.m.

After the council discussed its calendar and received committee reports, Mayor Karl Mooney adjourned the workshop. The regular meeting starts after a short break.

6:39 p.m.

The regular meeting has started. 

6:44 p.m.

Hear Visitors

No one spoke during Hear Visitors, when citizens may address the council on any item that does not appear on the posted agenda.

6:45 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • Estimated annual expenditures of $125,000 with Badger Meter for water meters.
  • A $2.35 million contract with Kieschnick General Contractors for the Southside Safety Improvements Project.
  • An oversized participation agreement that upsizes about 1,466 linear feet of water line from an 8-inch to an 18-inch water line through the Traditions Phase 24 and 25 subdivision.
  • An ordinance consenting to Order No. 3 under the mayor’s declaration of disaster regarding face coverings inside commercial businesses as proclaimed on June 25.

7:05 p.m.

BVSWMA Budget

The council voted unanimously to approve BVSWMA’s proposed FY 21 budget, which was approved by the BVSWMA Board of Directors on June 17. The City of Bryan is expected to consider it on July 14.

The landfill’s FY 21 budget revenue is $9.5 million, operating expenses of $7.1 million and capital expenses of $4.98 million. Total reserves, cash, and investments are $11.75 million. The budget also reduces the gate rate for both cities from $17.50 to $15 per ton.

Here’s the PowerPoint Presentation:

7:11 p.m.

Wellborn Road Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the zoning from Rural to Planned Development District — with a base zoning district of Wellborn Commercial — for about seven acres at 14565 and 14575 Wellborn Road. The change allows the development of low-density commercial uses that provide services to nearby neighborhoods.

Here’s the PowerPoint Presentation:

8:01 p.m.

Community Development Plans, Budget

The council voted unanimously to direct staff to move forward with the FY 21 (PY 20) Annual Action Plan, FY 21 Community Development Budget, and 2020-24 Consolidated Plan.

Here’s the PowerPoint Presentation:

8:10 p.m.

Taxing Unit Under Disaster Declaration

The council voted unanimously to defer lowering the voter approval tax rate — formerly known as the rollback tax rate — from 8% to 3.5% for FY 21. The Texas Legislature mandated the change during its last session, but it agreed that cities with disaster declarations in place should retain the option of deferring implementation of the change if faced with catastrophic revenue losses.

The council’s decision doesn’t increase the tax rate, but it potentially could help ensure that it doesn’t have to be lowered (rolled back) so the city can continue providing emergency response and other critical city operations.

Here’s the PowerPoint Presentation:

8:19 p.m.

MUD No. 1 Road Improvements:

The council voted unanimously to consent to the issuance of up to $2 million in road improvement bonds by Brazos County Municipal Utility District No. 1

8:29 p.m.

After the council discussed future agenda items, Mayor Mooney adjourned the meeting. The council meets again by teleconference on Thursday, July 23.

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as the associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council meets by teleconference for its workshop (after 5 p.m.) and regular (6 p.m.) meetings.

The meetings will be streamed live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and at cstx.gov/cstv19. To join the meeting online, go to Zoom or call 888-475-4499 and enter meeting number 997 0027 4418. Public comments will be allowed through Zoom.

To address the council via Zoom about any agenda item — or about non-agenda topics during Hear Visitors — you must register with the city secretary before the meeting by calling 979-764-3500 or emailing CSO@cstx.gov before the meeting starts. Written comments submitted to CSO@cstx.gov will be provided to the council members.

Here are five items to watch:

  1. Parkland Expansion: The council will consider converting about 196 acres of greenway to parkland. The Parks & Recreation Advisory Board unanimously passed the motion in June.
  2. Southside Safety Improvements:  As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider a $2.35 million contract with Kieschnick General Contractors for Southside safety improvements. The project includes the rehabilitation of Park Place, Holik Street, Glade Street, and Anna Street near Oakwood Intermediate School, A&M Consolidated Middle School, and College View High School.
  3. Wellborn Road Rezoning: After a public hearing, the council will consider a request to change the zoning from Rural to Planned Development District — with a base zoning district of Wellborn Commercial — for about seven acres at 14565 and 14575 FM 21. The change would allow the development of low-density commercial uses that provide services to nearby neighborhoods.
  4. Community Development Plans, Budget: The council will consider the proposed 2020- 2024 Consolidated Plan, FY 2021 (PY 2020) Annual Action Plan, and FY 2021 Community Development Budget.
  5. MUD No. 1 Road Improvements: The council will consider consenting to the issuance of up to $2 million in road improvement bonds by Brazos County Municipal Utility District No. 1.

Related Links:                                                            

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as the associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (May 14)

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular teleconference meetings on Thursday, May 14. It’s not the official minutes.

The live audio will be streamed on Suddenlink Channel 19 and at cstx.gov/cstv19. To join the meeting online, go to Zoom (passcode 200514) or call 888-475-4499 (meeting number 912 7257 8218).

6:07 p.m.

The workshop has started.

6:12 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council pulled these items for discussion from the regular meeting’s consent agenda:

  • Cemetery Maintenance Shop: The proposed $160,000 contract will include project evaluation, conceptual design, design development, final design and documentation, bidding, and construction services for the new maintenance shop at the College Station Memorial Cemetery. The project’s cost is covered through the Memorial Cemetery Fund.
  • Recycling Franchise Agreement: Tonight is the first reading of a franchise agreement with Howdy Disposal for the collection of demolition and construction debris, recyclables, and organic waste from commercial, industrial, and multifamily locations.

6:25 p.m.

Central Park Expansion

The council discussed the conversion of about 59 acres of city-owned property into parkland for expanding Stephen C. Beachy Central Park to about 106 acres. The council will vote on the conversion as part of the regular meeting’s consent agenda.

Here’s the PowerPoint Presentation:

6:29 p.m.

After the council discussed its calendar and received committee reports, Mayor Karl Mooney adjourned the workshop. The regular meeting starts after a short break.

6:36 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

6:41 p.m.

National Public Works Week

The mayor proclaimed May 17-23 as National Public Works Week.

6:48 p.m.

Hear Visitors

Two people spoke during hear visitors, when citizens may address the council on any item that does not appear on the posted agenda.

  • David Flash spoke about a troubling decline in complaints against the police department in recent years. He was concerned that total complaints have fallen significantly — despite rapid population growth — and asked the council to look into the matter. (Mr. Flash’s comments were edited May 28 to provide clarifying context).
  • Derek Arredondo asked the city to better support youth baseball.

6:50 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • A contract not to exceed $165,129 with Air Cleaning Technologies for installing vehicle exhaust removal systems at three fire stations.
  • A $160,000 contract with Arkitex Studio for design and construction consultation for a new maintenance shop at College Station Memorial Cemetery.
  • A five-year residential recycling collection franchise agreement and general service agreement not to exceed $4.54 million with BVR Waste and Recycling.
  • The first reading of a franchise agreement with Howdy Disposal for the collection of demolition and construction debris, recyclables, and organic waste from commercial, industrial and multifamily locations.
  • A $3.79 million contract with Larry Young Paving for the construction of Royder Road Phase 2.
  • An ordinance changing the posted speed limit to 50 mph on Wellborn Road from about 600 feet north of Victoria Avenue to about 2,600 feet south of Victoria Avenue during the Royder Road Phase 2 project.
  • An inter-local agreement with the Wellborn Special Utility District for its cost participation in the Royder Road Phase 2 project.
  • A $273,243.41 change order for the contract with Thalle Construction Company for the Lick Creek Trunk Line.
  • The conversion of 40.5 acres of greenway and 18.8 acres of city-owned property to parkland to be added to the existing 47.1 acres of Stephen C. Beachy Central Park. The total park acreage will be 106.4 acres.

7:01 p.m.

Economic Development Master Plan

The council voted unanimously to adopt the updated Economic Development Master Plan as part of the city’s Comprehensive Plan. The original Economic Development Master Plan was adopted in 2013.

The plan is designed to ensure that growth and development advance the city’s economic development objectives. The process also enhances College Station’s goal of “ensuring a diversified economy; generating quality, stable, full-time jobs; bolstering the sales and property tax base; and contributing to a high quality of life.”

In developing the plan, staff engaged with local residents, business owners and operators, and community leaders to understand their vision and to review and formulate pragmatic strategies.

Here’s the PowerPoint Presentation:

7:37 p.m.

Impact Fee Credit Policy

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a credit policy for system-wide roadway, water, and wastewater impact fees. The policy establishes standards for determining projects for which credit is eligible, the process requirements for obtaining credit, and the methods for applying credit to projects.

Here’s the PowerPoint Presentation:

8:28 p.m.

Impact Fees Policy Update

The council voted 3-3 on an update of system-wide impact fee policies. In a tie vote, the motion fails:

  • The city shall update its land use assumptions and capital improvements plans at least every five years, commencing approximately from the date of adoption of such plans, and shall recalculate the impact fees based thereon in accordance with the procedures set forth in Chapter 395 of the Texas Local Government Code, or in any successor statute.
  • The city may review its land use assumptions, impact fees, capital improvements plans and other factors such as market conditions more frequently than provided in subsection (a) to determine whether the land use assumptions and capital improvements plans should be updated and the impact fee recalculated accordingly, or whether the maximum allowable or assessable impact fees as set out in Exhibits H, M, or R herein, or the imposed impact fees or collection rates set out in Exhibits I, N, or S herein should be changed. Imposed impact fees or collection rates may be amended without revising land use assumptions and capital improvements plans at any time prior to the update provided for in subsection (a), provided that the impact fees to be collected do not exceed the maximum allowable or assessable impact fees assessed.
  • If at the time an update is required pursuant to subsection (a) the city council determines that no change to the land use assumptions, capital improvements plan or impact fee is needed, it may dispense with such update by following the procedures in Texas Local Government Code § 395.0575.
  • The city may amend by resolution the imposed impact fees or collection rates set out in Exhibits I, N, or S herein, at any time prior to the update provided for in subsection (a), provided that the number of service units associated with a particular land use shall not be increased.

Here’s the PowerPoint Presentation:

8:28 p.m.

The council is taking a short break.

8:38 p.m.

The meeting has resumed.

9:13 p.m.

Roadway Impact Fees

The council voted unanimously to not conduct a public hearing at the May 28 city council meeting to consider changing the collection rate per service unit for roadway impact fees.

9:21 p.m.

Police Station Under Budget

The council voted unanimously to approve a $403,836 reduction in the contract with Vaughn Construction for the new police station, completing the project under its original $29.5 million budget.

10:11 p.m.

Thoroughfare Plan Amendments

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to amend the city’s Thoroughfare Plan by modifying the alignment of a future minor arterial between Koppe Bridge Road and Clay Pit Road and by removing a future minor collector between the Meadow Creek Subdivision and Minter Springs Road.

The roads are located in the city’s extraterritorial jurisdiction. 

Here’s the PowerPoint Presentation:

10:16 p.m.

Burgess Lane Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the zoning from Rural and Planned Development District to Business Park for about six acres at 8822 and 8850 Burgess Lane. The property is part of the proposed Fujifilm campus expansion.

Here’s the PowerPoint Presentation:

10:21 p.m.

Biomedical Way ROW Abandonment

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to abandon a 0.693-acre portion of right-of-way southeast of the intersection of HSC Parkway and Biomedical Way to allow for the expansion of the Fujifilm development.

Here’s the PowerPoint Presentation:

10:29 p.m.

COVID-19 Relief

The council voted unanimously to approve amendments to the city’s 2015-19 Consolidated Plan that allow the city to more quickly and efficiently address local needs related to the COVID-19 pandemic with federal funds.

The city is entitled to receive $697,507 in additional Community Development Block Grant (CDBG-CV) funds from the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development in Fiscal Year 2019 and has prepared substantial amendments to the Citizen Participation Plan, 2015-2019 Consolidated Plan and the 2019 Annual Action Plan to secure those funds.

Community Development staff consulted with counselors from CSISD and 2-1-1 to determine the most requested assistance. Additionally, a public survey was conducted to determine how important these identified needs were as well as requesting input about additional needs.

Here’s the PowerPoint Presentation:

10:37 p.m.

After the council discussed future agenda items, Mayor Mooney adjourned the meeting. The council meets again by teleconference on Thursday, May 28.

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as the associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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Live Blog: Monday’s city council meetings (Sept. 11)

Back (L-R): Linda Harvell, Jerome Rektorik, James Benham, Barry Moore. Front (L-R): Blanche Brick, Mayor Karl Mooney, Julie Schultz.

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Monday, Sept. 11. It’s not the official minutes.

The meeting is being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channels 19 and 119 (HD) and online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

6:31 p.m.

The workshop has started. No action was taken out of executive session.

Workshop Meeting Agenda and Background Materials

6:43 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled these consent items for workshop discussion:

  • Westside Community Park: Staff is requesting approval for the $2.5 million purchase of two tracts (48.6 acres and 55.4 acres) and the acceptance of a third tract (7 acres) as a donation to be developed into the Westside Community Park. The property is located on North Dowling Road west of the city. Additional costs will include surveying, environmental reports, title insurance, and closing fees, which are estimated not to exceed $80,000. Funds are budgeted in the Community Park Land Zone B Fund, the Neighborhood Park Land Zone 15 fund, and the Neighborhood Parks Revolving Fund.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

  • Rental Registration Ordinance Amendment: In July, staff provided the council with an overview and update on the rental registration program. The council directed staff to eliminate the requirement to renew the registration of a property on an annual basis and instead require only an initial registration. Staff recommended adding an additional requirement to register four-plex and other types of rental units to assist city staff when responding to an issue, violation, or emergency.

    Staff reviewed the ordinance as adopted and included changes to clarify information for property owners and residents to better understand which properties are subject to the law. The changes include: The title of the ordinance was revised; the types of properties were added to include single-family, townhome, duplex, triplex, fourplex, five-plex & six-plex; a definition of multi-family dwelling was added; a definition of owner occupied was added; clarification that a new registration is required in the event of a change in ownership; change in local contact information must be reported within 30 days; and fee of $15 charged per building.

  • Single-Stream Recycling Agreement: Staff recommends renewal of years 3-5 of a five-year franchise agreement and general services contract with Brazos Valley Recycling for the collection, processing, and marketing of recyclable materials. The city pays an annual cost of $880,000. The provision of recycling collection services and associated public education programs account for $3.18 out of the $14.40 monthly sanitation fee charged to each customer.
  • Transportation Network Ordinance Repeal: The governor recently signed HB100 into law to provide a uniform, statewide approach to regulating and permitting transportation network companies through the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation. The law preempts local control by establishing exclusive power and function solely to the state. As such, the city transportation network company ordinance will be repealed.

7:12 p.m.

Council to repeal city’s hands-free ordinance

The council voted 4-3 to direct staff to bring back an ordinance to repeal the existing city law regarding the use of hand-held communication devices while driving. The state legislature recently took action to ban texting and driving statewide. The city’s ordinance prohibits any use of hand-held communication devices while driving.

The discussion also included a review of a study by the Texas A&M Transportation Institute on the effectiveness of the city ordinance.

Survey of Wireless Communication Device Use

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:27 p.m.

Long-Term Water Supplies

The council heard a presentation about potential long-term water supplies. College Station’s water comes entirely from groundwater wells. As groundwater reserves are drawn down, the city could be required to reduce its pumping amounts.

Consequently, the city is planning for alternative water supplies that would replace any required cutbacks. Possibilities include direct potable reuse, aquifer storage and recovery, desalination, and surface water.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:28 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar and received committee reports. The regular meeting will start after a short break.

7:36 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

Regular Meeting Agenda and Background Materials

7:41 p.m.

Laserfiche Excellence Award

Deputy City Secretary Ian Whittenton was recognized for receiving MCCi’s Laserfiche Excellence Award for its innovative use of Laserfiche. 

7:43 p.m.

Constitution Week

The mayor proclaimed Sept. 17-23 as Constitution Week in commemoration of America’s most important document. The celebration of the Constitution was started by the Daughters of the American Revolution in 1955 when the DAR petitioned Congress to set aside an annual observance. The resolution was adopted by the U.S. Congress and signed into law in 1956 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. 

7:48 p.m.

Thank a Police Officer Day

Mayor Mooney proclaimed Saturday, Sept. 16 as Thank a Police Officer Day in College Station. The event is promoted by the College Station Citizens Police Academy Alumni Association

7:49 p.m.

Hear Visitors

No one signed up to speak during Hear Visitors when citizens might address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda.

7:49 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • An Interlocal agreement with Brazos County and the City of Bryan to apply for and accept a 2017 Justice Assistance Grant from the U.S. Department of Justice.
  • An $11.36 million contract with Larry Young Paving for the Lakeway Drive Project.
  • A $2.88 million contract with Larry Young Paving for the Royder Road Expansion Phase 1 Project.
  • Temporarily changed the posted speed limit to 25 mph on Royder Road between the city limit to 700 feet north of Backwater Drive during the Royder Road Expansion Phase 1 project.
  • A $315,000 contract with Brazos Paving for construction of the culvert and replacement of the water line at the intersection of Dominik and Stallings Drive.
  • Awarded a $545,000 contract to C3 Constructors for the Carter Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant’s 4 and 5 Blower Improvements.
  • A resolution naming the authorized representative on the Public Agency Retirement Services’ Public Agencies Post-Retirement Health Care Plan Trust account.
  • An agreement for administrative services with Public Agency Retirement Services in the amount of 0.25 percent of plan assets for financial advisory services on an annual basis, estimated to be $3,250 in this initial year.
  • A $230,000 contract with Xpedient Mail for printing and mailing utility bills, late notices, and inserts.
  • A three-year Interlocal Agreement with the City of Bryan and Brazos County for the City of College Station to provide Emergency Medical Ambulance Service to Brazos County and to receive payments every quarter.
  • The final reading of the recycling collection franchise ordinance and service agreement renewal with Brazos Valley Recycling not to exceed $880,000 or the number of customers times the approved contract rates.
  • The acquisition of 110.95 acres to be developed into Westside Community Park.
  • A $256,384 contract with Utility Restoration Services for annual padmount equipment repair and restoration.
  • An amendment to the city’s Code of Ordinances regarding the working hours for necessary construction.
  • An amendment to the city’s Building and Building Regulations and Single-Family and Duplex Unit Rental Registration.
  • Repealed the city ordinance regarding Transportation Network Companies after the state legislature passed a bill allowing only the state to regulate transportation network companies.

7:51 p.m.

FY18 Budget Public Hearing

The council conducted a public hearing on the city’s proposed $365.5 million budget for FY18, which is scheduled for adoption Sept. 25.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:58 p.m.

FY18 Tax Rate Public Hearing

The council conducted a public hearing on the city’s proposed tax rate for FY18, which is scheduled for adoption Sept. 25. The proposed rate is 49.75 cents per $100 of assessed value, a 2½-cent increase from the current rate.

One person spoke against the tax increase during the public hearing.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

10:24 p.m.

Fairview Avenue Rezoning at George Bush Drive

After a public hearing, the council voted 4-3 to approve a request to rezone two lots on the south side of Fairview Avenue at the George Bush Drive intersection. Councilwomen Blanche Brick and Linda Harvell joined Mayor Mooney is voted against the motion. The change will allow the relocation of the nearby Aggieland Outfitters store.

Ten people spoke against the zoning change and three for it during the public hearing. One written statement supporting the change also was submitted.

Here are the PowerPoint presentations:

 

10:24 p.m.

The meeting will resume after a short break.

10:34 p.m.

The meeting has resumed.

10:37 p.m.

UDO Amendment: Utility Easements

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to amend the city’s Unified Development Ordinance (UDO) regarding the location of utility easements. The change is part of efforts to streamline the UDO and will give the city engineer flexibility regarding the location and width of utility easements, which will reduce costs for the developer, staff time for processing waiver requests, and the number of waiver requests considered by the Planning & Zoning Commission.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

10:40 p.m.

UDO Amendment: Health Clubs

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to amend the UDO to permit health clubs in Commercial Industrial zoning districts. The change allows gyms and exercise facilities to use buildings with a warehouse or industrial character.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

10:40 p.m.

The council discussed and reviewed future agenda items.

10:40 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the meeting. The council meets again on Monday, Sept. 25.

 


About the Author

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also been a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.



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Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Aug. 24)

Back (L-R): Linda Harvell, Jerome Rektorik, James Benham, Barry Moore. Front (L-R): Blanche Brick, Mayor Karl Mooney, Julie Schultz.

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Aug. 24. It’s not the official minutes.

The meeting is being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channels 19 and 119 (HD) and online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:34 p.m.

The workshop has started. Councilwoman Julie Schultz is absent tonight.

No action was taken out of executive session.

5:57 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled these consent items for workshop discussion:

  • Graham Substation Equipment: The equipment purchased through this bid requires a significant delivery time from the date of purchase and is be installed during the construction of the Graham Road Substation in 2018. The equipment to be purchased includes transformers, a gas circuit breaker, circuit switchers, and 3-phase electric substation transformers. The bid includes delivery, set-up of the transformers on the foundations, filling with oil, and testing.
  • Four-Way Stop at Thomas/Dexter: The intersection of Thomas Street and Dexter Drive has stop signs on the Thomas Street approaches. An area resident expresses concerns about appropriate sight lines. Traffic Engineering found that the sight line for vehicles at the stop sign on the westbound approach was inadequate to see vehicles approaching the from the left on Dexter. Consequently, Traffic Engineering recommends making it a four-way stop controlled intersection.
  • Brazos Valley Recycling: Staff recommends renewal of years 3-5 of a five-year franchise agreement and general services contract with Brazos Valley Recycling for the collection, processing, and marketing of recyclable materials. The city pays an annual cost of $880,000. Recycling collection services and associated public education programs account for $3.18 of the $14.40 monthly sanitation fee charged to each customer.
  • Water Well No. 9: The project includes the installation of Well  No. 9 and a collection line on city property to add additional pumping capacity to match population projections and state requirements. Final project costs are expected to be less than what was budgeted in FY17.
  • Water Line Relocation: Staff recommends approval of a construction contract for the installation of a water line west of the FM2818-FM60 intersection. The existing 30-inch water line will be removed or filled with grout.

6:04 p.m.

BVSWMA FY18 Budget

The council approved the Brazos Valley Solid Waste Management Agency’s proposed budget for FY18, which includes $8.92 million in revenues and $9.44 million in expenses. The budget also reduces the gate rate from $20.50 to $20.00 per ton from Bryan and College Station.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:20 p.m.

Park Preserves in ETJ

The council heard a presentation about potential parkland in the city’s 3½-mile extraterritorial jurisdiction. The discussion covered parkland needs and possibilities and included the Parks and Recreation Master Plan, current parks and greenways properties, current land purchase efforts, the Parkland Dedication Ordinance, and possible funding.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:28 p.m.

Traffic Control Center Award

The council heard a presentation about the national Public Agency Council Achievement Award received by the Traffic Systems and Traffic Engineering divisions for the city’s Traffic Control Center (TCC). The award was presented at the Institute of Transportation Engineers annual meeting in Toronto. Pictured below (L-R) are Traffic Signal Technician Jimmy Pletzer, Traffic Signal Technician Juan Gonzalez, Jr., Traffic Systems Superintendent Lee Robinson, Mayor Mooney, Traffic Engineer Troy Rother, and Traffic Systems Foreman Garrett Martinek.

This award recognizes agencies that have achieved excellence through implementing innovative ideas and delivering outstanding transportation engineering, planning, and operations. The TCC helps improve traffic conditions with new technologies and allows signal timings to be changed in real-time during special events or roadway incidents.

Signal performance measure software also allows city staff to better monitor and adjust traffic signal operations. The City of College Station was the first agency in Texas to implement signal performance measures, and others are following our lead.

The TCC pulls together video streams from more than 100 cameras that are shared with the Police and Fire Departments as well as Texas A&M. The video streams are critical when moving 120,000 fans away from Kyle Field after football games. Staff from Traffic Systems, Traffic Engineering and the Police Department man the TCC during the postgame operations, observing the video streams and manipulating signal timings. The TCC is in constant communication with the Kyle Field command center.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:42 p.m.

Bloomberg Mayors Challenge

The council discussed the city’s participation in Bloomberg Philanthropies 2017 Mayors Challenge. The initiative is designed to help city leaders think big, be bold and uncover inventive and shareable ideas to tackle problems, deliver results and improve life for residents.

Entrants will receive expert guidance to develop their ideas and will join Bloomberg’s cities network, which identifies, elevates, and promotes innovations that work. The 35 Champion Cities will win up to $100,000 to test their ideas and build local support. The five cities with the best ideas will receive millions to implement their ideas at scale.

6:47 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar and received committee reports. The regular meeting will start at 7 p.m.

7:06 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

7:11 p.m.

The mayor proclaimed September as Still Creek Ranch Month.

7:20 p.m.

Hear Visitors

Two people spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens might address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda.

  • Ben Roper recognized Marine Lance Corporal Todd R. Bolding as part of the Fallen Heroes Memorial program. The 23-year-old Manvel native died June 3, 2004, after being wounded in hostile action in Al Anbar Province, Iraq.
  • Fred Dupriest of the Southside Neighborhood Advocacy Group spoke about the city’s planning terminology, specifically how mitigation is not necessarily a benefit.
  • Michael Kuitu and Cathy Liles submitted written comments.

7:23 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted 6-0 to approve the consent agenda:

  • A $316,746 purchase of various long lead time major equipment for the proposed Graham Substation.
  • A purchase not to exceed $1,145,926 of two 3-phase electric substation transformers for the proposed Graham Road Substation.
  • Renewal of the recycling collection franchise ordinance and service agreement with Brazos Valley Recycling not to exceed $880,000 or the number of customers multiplied by the approved agreement rates.
  • A $5.6 million contract with Garney Construction to install water well No. 9 and a collection line.
  • A $433,552 contract with Dudley Construction to relocate the 30-inch water line at FM2818 and FM60.

This item was pulled from tonight’s agenda:

  • Modifications to the Research Valley Partnership’s bylaws.

This item was voted on separately:

  • The council voted 6-0 to approve the addition of a four-way stop intersection at Thomas Street and Dexter Drive. Councilwoman Brick requested this item be pulled for a separate vote so she could thank the neighborhood residents and city staff.

7:49 p.m.

Plantation Oaks Addition Land Use

After a public hearing, the council voted 5-1 to deny a request to change the land use designation from Suburban Commercial to General Commercial for about 1.3 acres north of University Oaks Boulevard on the west side of Earl Rudder Freeway. Councilman Barry Moore supported the motion. Three people spoke against the change in the public hearing.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:59 p.m.

Plantation Oaks Addition Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted 6-0 to deny a request to change the zoning district boundaries from Office to General Commercial for the same property in the previous item. Two people spoke against the change in the public hearing.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:04 p.m.

Koppe Bridge Land Use

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the land use designation from Suburban Commercial to General Commercial for about 1.7 acres on the east side of Wellborn Road where Koppe Bridge Bar & Grill is located. The change will make the tract conform with property to the north that will be developed into an HEB store.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:06 p.m.

Koppe Bridge Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the land use designation from Rural to General Commercial for the same property in the previous item.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:51 p.m.

Off-Street Parking Standards

After a public hearing, the council unanimously approved amended off-street parking standards in the city’s Unified Development Ordinance to provide flexibility and reduce regulatory barriers. One person spoke in the public hearing.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:56 p.m.

The council discussed and reviewed future agenda items.

8:56 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the meeting. The council meets again on Monday, Sept. 11.

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also been a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.



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