Posts tagged “budget

Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (June 11)

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular teleconference meetings on Thursday, June 11. It’s not the official minutes.

The live audio will be streamed on Suddenlink Channel 19 and at cstx.gov/cstv19. To join the meeting, go to Zoom or call 888-475-4499 and enter meeting number 969 6026 4785. 

6:02 p.m.

The workshop has started. 

6:18 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council pulled this item for discussion from the regular meeting’s consent agenda:

  • Mowing and Landscaping Contract: This is the first renewal of a contract not to exceed $1.1 million with Green Teams is for citywide mowing and landscape maintenance.

6:42 p.m.

COVID-19 Financial Impact

The council voted unanimously to accept the report on the financial impact of COVID-19 on the city’s FY 20 budget along with the year-end estimate.

Estimated pandemic-related revenue losses range from $2.9 million to $4.7 million from sales taxes, parks programs, the municipal court, investments, and facility rentals. Mitigation strategies, which will save about $5.3 million, include a hiring freeze, departmental reductions, and the elimination of summer parks programs.

Here’s the PowerPoint Presentation:

8:23 p.m.

Short-Term Rental Ordinance 

The council directed staff to bring back a revised ordinance regulating short-term rental housing such as Airbnb. The proposed ordinance addresses requirements for allowable zoning districts, verified owner-occupancy through the homestead exemption, grandfathering of existing STRs, and safety inspections

Here’s the PowerPoint Presentation:

8:27 p.m.

After the council discussed its calendar and received committee reports, Mayor Karl Mooney adjourned the workshop. The regular meeting starts after a short break.

8:38 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

8:43 p.m.

The council finished its calendar discussion from the workshop.

8:50 p.m.

Hear Visitors

Two people spoke during hear visitors, when citizens may address the council on any item that does not appear on the posted agenda.

  • Shiva Saravanan requested that CSPD make its use of force policy available on the city website.
  • Nicolas Macri asked the council and police department to consider 8cantwait.org reforms.

8:52 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • Cancelled the postponed special runoff election for city council member Place 4.
  • A $2 million funding agreement with the Texas Department of Transportation for the city’s contribution for utility relocations for the FM 2818 widening project.
  • The second year of a two-year, $140,000 contract with Precept Insurance Solutions for an online benefits administration platform.
  • The first renewal of a contract not to exceed $1.1 million with Green Teams for citywide mowing and landscape maintenance.
  • Renewal of an annual price agreement not to exceed $712,700 with Techline for wire and cable.
  • A short-term budget for the 60 days before the August 1 contract termination of the agreement with the City of Bryan and Experience Bryan College Station.

8:58 p.m.

Harvey Mitchell Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the zoning from General Commercial and Office to MultiFamily, Natural Areas Protected, and General Commercial for about 14 acres at 2325 Harvey Mitchell Parkway South, which is located north of the intersection with Texas Avenue.

The change will help attract commercial and residential opportunities to undeveloped property near a major intersection.

Here’s the PowerPoint Presentation:

9:01 p.m.

Glenhaven Estates NPO

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to establish the city’s one remaining Neighborhood Prevailing Overlay district — Glenhaven Estates Subdivision — as a retired zoning district in the city’s Unified Development Ordinance. In March, the council removed NPO references to eliminate redundancy.

Here’s the PowerPoint Presentation:

9:21 p.m.

Certificates of Obligation

The council voted unanimously to approve the issuance of up to $23.7 million in 2020 certificates of obligation for streets, police station construction, information technology, electric and water improvements, and debt costs.

Refunding Bonds

The council voted unanimously to approve the refunding of up to $19.3 million in 2020 general obligation bonds, which will save the city about $2.7 million over their remaining life.

Here’s the PowerPoint Presentation:

9:22 p.m.

After the council discussed future agenda items, Mayor Mooney adjourned the meeting. The council meets again by teleconference on Thursday, June 25.

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as the associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

If you found value in this blog post, please share it with your social network and friends!


		
	

5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council meets Thursday by teleconference for its workshop (no sooner than 5 p.m.) and regular (6 p.m.) meetings. 

The live audio will be streamed on Suddenlink Channel 19 and at cstx.gov/cstv19. Public comments are allowed through Zoom. To join the meeting, go to Zoom or call 888-475-4499 and enter meeting number 969 6026 4785. 

To address the council about any agenda item — or about non-agenda topics during Hear Visitors — you must register with the city secretary before the meeting by calling 979-764-3500 or emailing CSO@cstx.gov before the meeting starts. Written comments submitted to CSO@cstx.gov will be provided to the council members.

Here are five items to watch:

  1. COVID-19 Financial Impact: In the workshop, the council will discuss the FY 2020 year-end estimate and the financial impact of COVID-19 on the city’s budget.
  2. Short-Term Rental Ordinance: Another workshop item is a discussion about council-suggested elements of a possible ordinance to regulate short-term rental housing.
  3. Harvey Mitchell Rezoning: After a public hearing in the regular meeting, the council will consider a request to change the zoning for about 14 acres at 2325 Harvey Mitchell Parkway South — located north of the intersection with Texas Avenue — to help attract commercial and residential opportunities.
  4. Certificates of Obligation: The council will consider approving up to $23.7 million in 2020 certificates of obligation for streets, police station construction, information technology, electric and water improvements, and debt issuance costs.
  5. Refunding Bonds: The council will consider approving up to $19.3 million in 2020 general obligation refunding bonds, which will save the city about $1.4 million over the remaining life of the issues.

Related Links:                                                           

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as the associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

If you found value in this blog post, please share it with your social network and friends!


		
	

Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Sept. 26)

Sitting (L-R): Mayor Pro Tem Linda Harvell, Mayor Karl Mooney, Elianor Vessali. Standing (L-R): Bob Brick, Jerome Rektorik, John Nichols, Dennis Maloney.

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Sept. 26. It’s not the official minutes.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink channel 19 or online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:39 p.m.

The workshop has started. The council took no action out of the executive session.

5:50 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled these consent items for workshop discussion:

  • Bingo Fee Collection: The resolution continues the city’s share of the prize fees awarded at bingo games conducted in College Station after Jan. 1 as required by new state law.
  • Holleman Drive Speed Limit: The ordinance would change the speed limit from 60 mph to 40 on Holleman Drive South between North Dowling Road and Rock Prairie Road. A recently completed project widened Holleman to four lanes with a median/center turn lane.

6:19 p.m.

Residential Parking

The council reviewed city ordinances, policies, and practices related to parking in residential areas. The discussion included parking in school zones, parking removal policies, parking pavement coverage on residential lots, and game day parking.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:40 p.m.

Traffic Calming Policy

The council received an update on the city’s traffic calming policy, which allows staff to be more responsive to resident’s requests and creates a ranking matrix of neighborhood plans based on safety criteria.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:47 p.m.

Mayor Karl Mooney adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar and received committee reports. The regular meeting will start after a short break.

6:57 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

7:03 p.m.

MDA Fill The Boot Days

Mayor Mooney proclaimed Oct. 10-12 as the College Station Fire Department’s “Fill the Boot” days benefitting the Muscular Dystrophy Association.

7:07 p.m.

TAAF Games of Texas

Mayor Mooney presented a shadow box to Texas Amateur Athletic Federation Executive Director Mark Lord. The box contains mementos from the TAAF’s 2019 Summer Games of Texas that were conducted here in July. Lord also presented the city with a plaque in appreciation of its support of the games.

The event attracted 8,461 athletes from across the state to compete in 12 sports. Only 130 participants were local, which means the rest – along with about 20,000 of their coaches, family members, and friends – were visitors who dropped an estimated $8.1 million into the local economy.

7:10 p.m.

Hear Visitors

One person spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens might address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda.

  • Councilwoman Elianor Vessali recognized Army Capt. Rowdy J. Inman as part of the Fallen Heroes Project. The 38-year-old Panorama Village native died of combat wounds on Dec. 22, 2007, in Mosul, Iraq.

7:15 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve these consent agenda items:

  • Renewal of six master agreements for real estate appraisal services with Duff &

Phelps, JLL Valuation & Advisory Services, Lowery Property Advisors, Paul Hornsby & Company, S.T. Lovett & Associates and Valbridge Property Advisors.

  • A $144,060, three-year contract with Frontier Communications for a 2-gigabyte internet connection.
  • A resolution adopting the Fire Department’s fees, rates, and charges.
  • Annual blanket orders not to exceed $1,065,070.50 for electric inventory items: Techline ($658,887), KBS Electric ($253,115), Texas Electric Cooperative ($92,975), and Anixter ($60,093).
  • A resolution approving the continued receipt of a share of the bingo prize fees awarded at bingo games conducted in College Station after Jan. 1.
  • FY20 insurance premiums for all lines of coverage not to exceed $650,000, including Excess Liability and Workers’ Compensation Insurance, Property/Boiler & Machinery, Commercial Crime, EMT Liability, Auto Property Damage, Cyber Liability, Unmanned Aircraft liability and property, and Special Events.
  • Renewal of the annual price agreement not to exceed is $503,214.55 for electric three-phase pad mount transformers with KBS Electrical Distributors.
  • A $3.28 million contract with Larry Young Paving to construct Phase 1 of the widening of Greens Prairie Trail.
  • An ordinance temporarily changing the posted speed limit to 30 mph on Greens Prairie Road from 1,000 feet west of Woodlake Drive to the Royder Road Intersection during the Greens Prairie Road Widening Project.

This item was voted on separately:

  • The council voted unanimously approved a motion by Councilman John Nichols to postpone until Oct. 7 the vote on the ordinance changing the posted speed limit on Holleman Drive South from North Dowling Road to the Rock Prairie Road Intersection. The limit in the ordinance was 40 mph, and Nichols motion asked that it be 45.

7:26 p.m.

Assistance to Firefighters Grant

The council voted unanimously to approve a resolution accepting a $315,597 Assistance to Firefighters Grant. The funds will be used for the Blue Card Hazard Zone Incident Command Training and Certification Program and source-capturing diesel exhaust removal systems for fire stations.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:40 p.m.

Fun for All Playground Phase 2

The council voted unanimously to approve a $1.8 million contract for Phase 2 of the Fun for All Playground at Central Park. The second phase includes a stadium with bleachers and a quarter-scale artificial turf field. 

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:46 p.m.

Budget Amendment

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a $325,000 amendment to the FY19 city budget. 

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:18 p.m.

FY 20 Budget Adoption

The council voted 6-1 to adopt the city’s FY 20 budget of $341.2 million, which includes a general fund budget of $105.2 million and capital projects totaling $57.9 million. Councilwoman Elianor Vessali voted against the budget. A public hearing on the budget was Sept. 12.

In a second vote, the council voted 6-1 to ratify the increase in property tax revenue reflected in the budget. Councilwoman Vessali voted against the motion.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:56 p.m.

FY 20 Tax Rate Adoption

The council voted 5-2 to adopt the FY 20 proposed property tax rate of $0.534618 per $100 assessed value, a $.028777-cent increase. Councilwoman Vessali and Councilman Jerome Rektorik voted against the motion. The proposed rate will generate $51.7 million for debt service and city operations. Four residents spoke against the tax increase.

Public hearings on the tax rate were Aug. 22 and Sept. 12.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

9:06 p.m.

Texas Independence Ballpark Midtown College Station

The council voted unanimously to officially name the new park on Rock Prairie Road as Texas Independence Ballpark Midtown College Station. The council also named the complex’s eight ball fields as Gonzales, Goliad, Alamo, San Jacinto, Sabine River, Rio Grande, Red River, and Lone Star.

The park had been temporarily called Southeast Park.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

9:22 p.m.

Texas A&M Ticket Reselling

The council voted unanimously to approve an ordinance related to Texas A&M ticket reselling, along with an inter-local agreement with the university for related law enforcement assistance. 

Reselling of A&M football tickets often results in unsuspecting buyers purchasing invalid or counterfeit tickets. The ordinance requires a university permitting process. It doesn’t impact the occasional resale of personal tickets. The agreement allows university police to help the city with enforcement.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

9:24 p.m.

BVSWMA Board Appointment

The council voted 6-0-1 to reappoint Councilman John Nichols to the Brazos Valley Solid Waste Management Agency’s board of directors. Nichols abstained from the vote.

9:24 p.m.

The council discussed and reviewed future agenda items.

9:24 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the meeting. The council meets again on Monday, Oct. 7.

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

If you found value in this blog post, please share it with your social network and friends!


		
	

5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (about 5 p.m.) and regular (6 p.m.) meetings.

Here are five items to watch:

  1. Residential Parking: In the workshop, the council will discuss city ordinances, policies, and practices related to parking in residential areas, including school zones, removal policies, pavement coverage on residential lots, and Aggie football game day parking. The council will also review updates on the city’s traffic calming policy.
  2. Greens Prairie Trail Widening: As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider a $3.28 million contract the reconstruction of Greens Prairie Trail from the city limit west of Woodlake intersection to Royder Road. The project will replace the existing asphalt road with a four-lane minor arterial concrete road.
  3. Fun for All Playground Phase 2: The council will consider a $1.8 million contract for Phase 2 of the Fun for All Playground at Central Park. The second phase includes a stadium with bleachers and a quarter-scale artificial turf field. Citizens and charitable organizations donated about $1.3 million for the project, and $546,000 comes from parkland funds.
  4. FY20 Budget, Tax Rate Adoption: In separate items, the council will consider adopting the proposed FY20 budget and property tax rate. The $341.2 million budget includes a general fund of $105.2 million and capital projects totaling $57.9 million. The proposed tax rate of $0.534618 per $100 assessed value is a $.028778-cent increase and would generate $51.7 million for debt service and city operations. The owner of an average-price home in College Station ($280,000) would pay about $8.58 more per month.
  5. Texas Independence Ballpark Midtown College Station: The council will consider officially naming the new park on Rock Prairie Road East as Texas Independence Ballpark Midtown College Station. The council will also consider naming the complex’s eight ball fields as Gonzales, Goliad, Alamo, San Jacinto, Sabine River, Rio Grande, Red River, and Lone Star. The park had been temporarily called Southeast Park.

Related Links:                                                                 

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

If you found value in this blog post, please share it with your social network and friends!


		
	

Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Sept. 12)

Sitting (L-R): Mayor Pro Tem Linda Harvell, Mayor Karl Mooney, Eleanor Vessali. Standing (L-R): Bob Brick, Jerome Rektorik, John Nichols, Dennis Maloney.

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Sept. 12. It’s not the official minutes.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink channel 19 or online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:06 p.m.

The workshop has started. Councilman Dennis Maloney is absent tonight.

The council took no action out of the executive session.

5:10 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled this consent item for workshop discussion:

  • Infrastructure Participation Agreement: The agreement prepares a section of The Business Center at College Station Phase II for development with the addition of needed infrastructure, including detention, sidewalks, shared driveway access, and sewer. The city is under contract to sell about seven acres. The agreement details the cost-sharing of infrastructure outlined in the real estate contract. In general, the shared infrastructure will be designed by the city to standards and requirements. Grand Jr. will construct the shared infrastructure, and the city will reimburse for its portion once the items are completed, inspected and accepted.
  • Justice Assistance Grant: The Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant program is the primary provider of federal criminal justice funding to state and local jurisdictions and funds all components of the criminal justice system. The CSPD intends to use this funding to support local initiatives, technical assistance, training, equipment, supplies, or information technology projects that will enhance law enforcement programs.

5:27 p.m.

CodeFest Review

The council reviewed the city’s first CodeFest Aug. 17-18 at the Meyer Center. Funded entirely by sponsorships, the event attracted 45 participants from College Station, Austin, and Houston.

The nine teams developed three apps and six websites focusing on various community needs. The top team won $1,000, with second place taking home $500. A second Codefest is tentatively planned for Jan. 25.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

5:34 p.m.

Mayor Karl Mooney adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar and received committee reports. The regular meeting will start at 6 p.m.

6:00 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

6:07 p.m.

Constitution Week

Mayor Mooney proclaimed Sept. 17-23 as Constitution Week in College Station in recognition of America’s most important document. The United States Constitution stands as a testament to the tenacity of Americans throughout history to maintain their liberties, freedoms, and inalienable rights.

6:32 p.m.

Hear Visitors

Seven people spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens might address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda.

  • Councilwoman Elianor Vessali recognized Army Capt. Sean E. Lyerly as part of the Fallen Heroes Project. The 31-year-old Pflugerville native died in a helicopter crash on Jan. 20, 2007 in Baghdad, Iraq.
  • Jacob Prazak of the College Station Professional Firefighters Association spoke about an effective new cancer screening for firefighters. He also spoke in support of the proposed increase in the property tax rate.
  • David Scott spoke against the process behind the clearing of trees in Lick Creek Park for the installation of a sewer line. He asked the city to restore the habitat that has been destroyed.
  • Donell Frankes spoke about the sewer work in Lick Creek Park. She said the scheduling of the work caused significant disruption to park programs and activities.
  • Jackie Girouard spoke about the destruction of Lick Creek Park caused by the sewer pipeline work.
  • Cheryl Lewis spoke about the threat to native vegetation and water resources in Lick Creek Park.
  • Sandy Dillard spoke about the threat to vital bird habitat in Lick Creek Park.

6:33 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • A participation agreement with Grand Jr. for constructing public infrastructure. City participation is not to exceed $208,851, excluding fixed fees.
  • Documents relating to the property owners association in The Business Center at College Station.
  • FY20 funds for items exempt from competitive bidding and other expenditures for inter-local contracts or fees mandated by state law that are greater than $100,000.
  • A negotiated settlement agreement between the Atmos Cities Steering Committee and Atmos Energy Corp.-Mid-Tex Division regarding the company’s 2019 rate review mechanism filings with rate tariffs and proof of revenues.
  • Amendments to certain sections of the city’s Code of Ordinances related to the Northgate Parking Garage Gate.
  • The annual price agreement not to exceed $120,000 with Corn’s Collision Center for heavy truck paint and body repairs.
  • An inter-local agreement with Brazos County and the City of Bryan to apply for and accept a 2019 Justice Assistance Grant from the U.S. Department of Justice.
  • The addition of a four-way stop intersection at Church Avenue east and westbound at Second Street and the public way of the Northgate surface parking lot.
  • Renewal of contracts for prefabricated signs and sign blanks with Vulcan Signs ($54,224.50) and for posts and hardware with Dobie Supply ($61,585.00).

6:42 p.m.

FY20 Budget Public Hearing

The council conducted a public hearing on the city’s proposed budget for the 2019-20 fiscal year, which begins Oct. 1. The total budget is about $341.2 million. The budget is scheduled for adoption Sept. 26. Two people spoke in the public hearing, one against waste in the budget and the other in support of the city’s workforce.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:02 p.m.

FY20 Tax Rate Public Hearing

The council conducted its final public hearing on the city’s proposed FY20 property tax rate of .534618 per $100 of assessed value, a $.028778-cent increase. The proposed rate would generate $51.7 million in revenue for general debt service and operations and maintenance. Five people spoke against the rate increase. (Blogger’s note: I originally wrote here that one of the speakers supported the increase. I misunderstood the intent of the speaker’s statement and regret the error.)   

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:02 p.m.

Rock Prairie-Fitch Rezoning

This item was pulled from tonight’s agenda and will be considered at a later date.

7:19 p.m.

Texas Avenue South Land Use

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the land use from Suburban Commercial and Natural Areas Reserved to General Commercial, Urban, and Natural Areas Reserved for almost nine acres at 2709 Texas Avenue South. One person spoke in the public hearing.

The change will allow for commercial and multi-family development. 

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:29 p.m.

University Drive East Land Use

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the land use from Natural Areas Reserved to General Commercial for about 1.3 acres at 3030 University Drive East. The changes would allow for a medical office in an existing building.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:36 p.m.

University Drive East Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the zoning from Light Industrial to General Commercial for about 1.3 acres at 3030 University Drive East. The changes would allow for a medical office in an existing building.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:42 p.m.

The council discussed and reviewed future agenda items.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the meeting. The council meets again on Thursday, Sept. 26.

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

If you found value in this blog post, please share it with your social network and friends!


		
	

5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (about 5 p.m.) and regular (6 p.m.) meetings.

Here are five items to watch:

  1. Texas Weekend of Remembrance: In the workshop, the council will review the 2019 Texas Weekend of Remembrance held Memorial Day weekend.
  2. 2020 U.S. Census: The council will hear a workshop presentation about the 2020 U.S. Census. A resolution supporting the census is part of the regular meeting’s consent agenda.
  3. Public Hearing on Proposed Tax Rate: In the regular meeting, the council will conduct the first public hearing on the city’s proposed FY20 property tax rate of .534618 per $100 of assessed value. The second public hearing is Sept. 12.
  4. Strategic Partnership Agreement: The council will conduct the second public hearing on a proposed strategic partnership agreement with Brazos County Municipal Utility District No. 2. The agreement outlines conditions for district annexation and limited-purpose commercial annexation.
  5. Senior Affordable Housing: The council will consider approving $463,000 in federal grant funds for purchase and rehabilitation costs for four affordable duplexes for income-eligible seniors at 3312 -3314 Normand Drive and 3337-3339 Longleaf Circle.

Related Links:                                                                 

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


If you found value in this blog post, please share it with your social network and friends!


		
	

City’s FY20 budget addresses current, future challenges

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The City of College Station’s proposed FY 2020 budget continues the city’s focus on public safety while providing resources for essential current and future infrastructure projects.

The $341 million budget was presented to the city council on Monday at the first of three dedicated workshops at the CSU Meeting and Training Facility. Additional workshops will be Tuesday and Wednesday.

 

General Fund RevenueThe proposed budget is about $19.7 million below last year’s budget because of the timing of capital project appropriations. The governmental fund’s budget totals about $105.2 million. This includes the general fund, which pays for public safety, public works, planning and development services, and administration. Enterprise budgets such as utilities are about $146 million and capital projects are just over $71.1 million. Special revenue fund budgets such as hotel taxes, community development, roadway maintenance, and impact fees total about $18.8 million and have restricted uses.

General Fund Expenditures

While property values continue to rise and bring in new revenue, it’s not enough to provide the infrastructure and levels of service our current and future residents need and deserve.

The proposed budget includes a 2.8777-cent increase in the property tax rate to 53.4618 cents per $100 of assessed value. Electric and wastewater rates won’t change, but a 15% increase is recommended for water rates to meet our existing and future capital infrastructure needs related to growth, and to ensure the water fund remains at stable levels in the coming years.

The first public hearing on the tax rate will be Aug. 22 at city hall. The city council will conduct public hearings on both the tax rate and budget on Sept. 12, with adoption set for Sept. 26.

“We proposed this budget in a way to address the needs of a growing community, as well as to maintain the excellent quality of life for our current residents,” City Manager Bryan Woods said. “We must, of course, always be prudent with available resources. The proposed budget attempts to take a strategic approach to address our community’s short- and long-term needs.”

While continued growth is a positive thing, the rapid pace strains city services such as public safety, transportation, and utility systems, as well as other core services.

Here are seven major points to consider about the proposed budget:

  1. Since 2009, our population has grown over 30% (about 40,000). During the same period, the student population grew nearly 34%, not counting the RELLIS Campus.
  2. Perhaps for the first time in College Station’s recent history, FY20 will see sales tax revenues being less than property tax revenues. That’s not all bad news, but it does show how sales tax can be a cyclical revenue stream.
  3. SB2, which will affect all Texas cities beginning in FY21, will limit our ability to generate the revenue needed to keep up with current needs, and certainly won’t provide a sustainable funding path for future growth.
  4. While property values are up, and we’ve seen positive developments in all parts of the city, we have seen an increase in the amount of exempt property with more than $2 billion of value now exempt. Those exemptions include much of what’s owned by the state of Texas, places of worship and faith-affiliated hospitals, seniors over the age of 65, and more.
  5. Healthcare costs continue to rise. The city has also recognized these increases, which contributes to the need to ensure salaries and benefits remain competitive for recruiting and retaining a workforce that’s able to meet our citizens’ expectations.
  6. Our employees are being asked to do far more than ever as the number of city workers per 1,000 citizens has declined. And while dozens more police and fire professionals have come aboard in the last decade — yet still fall short of recommended levels — the overall number of city employees remains relatively unchanged during that time frame.
  7. Our recent citizen survey identified a long list of city services that remain important to our residents, yet they also say we have lost ground in terms of the quality of those services.

Population Growth

Continued growth in the city’s overall and student populations must be addressed and play a major role in the budget process.

From 2010-19, College Station’s has population grown 30.5%, from 93,857 in the 2010 U.S. Census to an estimated 122,162 in 2019. The continued growth factor used in the five-year forecast is 2.5% for FY 2020-24.

The college student population grew 33.5% from 2008 to the fall of 2018. The enrollment numbers don’t include the impact of the RELLIS campus opening last fall in Bryan.

Sales Tax Revenues

Revenue sources for the General Fund include property and sales taxes, fines, service charges, and a transfer from enterprises such as utilities that are city-owned.

The sales tax rate is 8.25%, of which 6.25% goes to the state, 0.5% goes to Brazos County, and 1.5% goes to the City of College Station.

Sales tax revenue is difficult to predict since it depends on how much consumers spend. Growth in the city’s sales tax revenue has slowed substantially, rising only 2.5% in the two years from 2017 -2019.

For FY 2020, the city is budgeting only a 1% increase in sales tax revenue, well below the expected inflation rate. FY 2019 sales tax revenue is projected to fall $600,000 below budget.

FY 2021-24 forecasts include increases in sales tax revenue by 1.75% in both FY 2021 and FY 2022, and by 2% in both FY 2023 and FY 2024.

Property Values

The total net taxable certified value of property in College Station for 2019 is about $9.9 billion, an increase of 5.79% from 2018. About $308.2 million in new value was added to the tax rolls, and existing values rose by 1.88%.

Single-family homes have made up 46.6% of the total market value since FY 2013, while Multi-family has increased by 2.4%, and commercial properties have decreased by 3.0%. Properties that are exempt from ad valorem taxes – such as Texas A&M and other government-owned properties — have increased 3.1%, which has had a significant revenue impact.

Property Taxes

The City of College Station’s existing property tax rate of $.505841 per $100 of assessed value is just over 22% of the total $2.362841 rate paid by local citizens. The College Station Independent School District’s rate is $1.37200 while Brazos County is at $.485000.

Since 2010, the city’s population has grown 30.5%, while inflation has (CPI-U Index) has been 18.16%. The tax rate in that period has grown only 13.91%.

Based on the final property value numbers received, the FY 2020 effective tax rate — the rate that will raise the same revenue on the same properties — is $.495757 per $100 of assessed value. The adjusted rollback rate – the highest rate allowed before citizens can petition to lower the rate to the rollback rate – is $.534618.

Proposed Tax Rate

Earlier this year, Gov. Greg Abbott signed legislation to change the cap on the rollback rate from 8% to 3.5% effective for FY 2021. It also reduced the franchise fees the city receives for the use of rights-of-way.

Starting last spring, department directors took a critical look at departmental expenses and made recommendations to the city manager about prioritizing needs and how to address the revenue limitations.

City management recommends a proposed rate of $.534618 per $100 of assessed value, an increase of 2.8777 cents. Under the proposed rate, the owner of a $280,000 home would pay an additional $8.58 a month. Each cent on the tax rate generates about $820,000 that can be spent.

The proposed rate strategically addresses funding for existing commitments as well as known future needs. Woods recommends that about one-third of the revenue generated by the tax rate increase this year be held in the fund balance.

Financial Stability

The fund balance is the city’s safety net for emergencies or a downturn. Over the last several years actual fund balance has been between 20-25% of expenses. Bond-rating agencies encourage us to keep a balance equal to approximately 25% of expenses to get the lowest interest rates on our debt. The proposed budget formally moves the budgeted fund balance requirement from 15% to 18%. This demonstrates a commitment to maintain healthy fund balance reserves.

The FY 2020 budget is strategically designed to generate additional funds of approximately $1.5 million to begin addressing current and future public safety needs, including additional police officers and initial staffing for Fire Station No. 7. A study earlier this year found that we need 23 additional sworn officers.

Fundamental Shift

Before this year, sales taxes were the largest source of General Fund revenue. In FY 2020, sales tax provides 34.5% of the budget, while proposed property taxes provide the largest source of General Fund revenue at 35.3%.

That marks a fundamental shift in the primary revenue source for funding the majority of city services such as police, fire, and roads. The shift is small, but it represents funding stability for our existing commitments as well as a stable revenue source to provide for the needs of the future.

If approved, the city’s overall property tax rate would still rank among the lower half of Texas cities with populations of 75,000-150,000. Only five cities in our population group have a lower operations and maintenance tax rate than College Station’s proposed $.313175.

City Workforce

That brings us back to answering the demand of residents for high-quality services, which aren’t possible without the city’s most valuable resource — our workforce. Maintaining a competitive pay and benefits structure allows us to attract — and keep — well-qualified employees to serve our residents and visitors.

The city trimmed its budget significantly in the years after the 2008 economic downturn. While the police and fire departments grew in the last decade, most other services and departments remained relatively flat.

The mission of the police and fire departments, along with emergency medical services, is to provide a safe community for us to live in and raise our families. The police and fire departments accounted for 44% of the general fund budget in 2009, but by 2019, those departments comprised about 51%.

Meanwhile, the number of city employees per 1,000 population has decreased significantly from 9.7 in 2011 to 8.4 people in 2019. Most of the new city employees in the last decade have been in public safety. The Police Department has added 49 positions (both sworn and civilian) since 2010, while Fire had grown by 42 employees.

The elimination of the jail in the new police facility allows us to reclassify the detention officer positions into three police officer and five police assistant positions. Two other officers are also included in the budget.

Overall, the proposed budget adds 24 full-time equivalent employees, with 16 in public safety.  The six new firefighter positions are contingent upon the award of a federal grant, which will be determined in late August. Half of the salaries of the two new employees in parks will be covered by the Hotel Tax Fund.

Since the city provides essential services, it stands to reason that the largest general fund expense is for salaries and benefits. It’s vital that the compensation plan and benefits attract and retain qualified employees in a highly competitive environment.

City Services

Increased growth puts demands on resources and results in the need for service level increases. Service level adjustment highlights include:    

  • Police Department: 5 patrol officers and 2 vehicles; 5 police assistants.
  • Fire Department: 6 firefighters using pending SAFER Grant Award; Station-4 building maintenance.
  • Public Works: Attenuator truck, corrective facilities maintenance.
  • Parks and Recreation: Southeast Park crew Leader, grounds worker, and maintenance equipment.
  • Municipal Court: New operating software.
  • Economic Development: Economic development coordinator.
  • Information Technology: Cybersecurity service, firewall refresh, replacement software for open records requests.
  • Electric Utility: Comprehensive cost-of-service study, asset management system for substations and protection and control devices, relay foreman and vehicle, electric project coordinator/designer.
  • Water Services: Water rate restructuring review concurrent with wastewater.
  • Wastewater Services: Wastewater rate restructuring review concurrent with water, collection flow monitoring equipment.
  • Solid Waste: Street sweeper vehicle and operator.
  • Northgate: Surveillance camera system maintenance, funding for the temporary Boyett Street closure on peak nights.

Capital Projects and Infrastructure

The $71.1 million proposed for capital improvement projects come from various sources, including general obligation bonds authorized by voters, certificates of obligation supported by tax and utility rates, cash reserves from the General Fund, utility funds, and hotel tax fund.

Significant capital projects for FY20 include:

  • Final construction of the new police station.
  • Construction of a new city hall.
  • Royder Road Phase II.
  • Greens Prairie Road from city limits west of Woodlake to Royder Road.
  • Jones Butler intersection improvements.
  • Continued digital electric meter installation.
  • Final construction of the Graham Road Electric Substation.
  • Construction of the Rock Prairie Road elevated water storage tank.
  • Construction of Northeast Sewer Trunkline Phase III.
  • Improvements to the Carters Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant centrifuge.
  • Expansion of the Lick Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant.
  • Completion of Southeast Park Phase I.

The 2019-20 fiscal year is shaping up as another busy one for the City of College Station, which has many formidable challenges ahead. The proposed budget provides the resources to address these challenges while laying a firm and stable foundation for our future.

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

If you found value in this blog post, please share it with your social network and friends!


		
	

Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (July 25)

Sitting (L-R): Mayor Pro Tem Linda Harvell, Mayor Karl Mooney, Eleanor Vessali. Standing (L-R): Bob Brick, Jerome Rektorik, John Nichols, Dennis Maloney.

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, July 25. It’s not the official minutes.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink channel 19 or online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:22 p.m.

The workshop has started. Councilman Bob Brick is not present tonight but is joining the meeting via teleconference.

The council took no action out of its executive session, but Mayor Karl Mooney announced that the future agenda item regarding Thomas Park improvements requested on July 11 has been withdrawn. The contract approved at the meeting will move forward.

5:26 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled this consent item for workshop discussion:

  • Strategic Behavioral Health: The item concerns the mutual termination of the tax abatement agreement and approval of an economic development agreement with Strategic Behavioral Health.

6:23 p.m.

Neighborhood Conservation Overlay District

The council reviewed recommendations related to the Neighborhood Conservation Overlay zoning district and its associated standards and processes.

Based on lessons learned and direction received over the past year, staff presented potential NCO modifications to the council in March, including amendments to the process, district boundaries, specific NCO standards for inclusion, and the number of unrelated as a part of NCO.

Note: Due to technical difficulties, Councilman Brick left the meeting via teleconference at 6:14 p.m.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:23 p.m.

Mayor Mooney suspended the workshop after the council discussed its calendar and received committee reports. The workshop will resume after the regular meeting, which will start after a short break.

6:32 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

6:38 p.m.

Professional Engineers Day

The mayor proclaimed Aug. 7 as Professional Engineers Day to recognize City of College Station engineers for their significant contributions to the community through the application of scientific knowledge, mathematics, and ingenuity in solving technical, societal, and commercial problems.

6:45 p.m.

A&M Garden Club, La Villita Awards

The mayor recognized recent awards received by the A&M Garden Club and the La Villita Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution.

In May, the A&M Garden Club won a first-place National Garden Club award in the Historic Preservation Project category for its work with the Parks and Recreation Department and community service projects at Richard Carter Park. The club also for first for its educational publication “Milkweed for Monarch Butterflies.”

The La Villita Chapter of the DAR earned a first-place award in the Historic Preservation Contest for at the Texas DAR state convention in March for its historic preservation work. The South Central DAR also awarded the La Villita Chapter a second-place award for its work at Carter Park and during the 80th College Station Celebration event.

6:57 p.m.

Hear Visitors

Three people spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens might address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda.

  • Councilwoman Elianor Vessali recognized Army Capt. Anthony R. Garcia as part of the Fallen Heroes Project. The 48-year-old Fort Worth native died on Feb. 17, 2006, in Tikrit, Iraq, from a gunshot wound.
  • Jorge Sanchez asked the city to support the establishment of a farmers’ market in the Midtown development.
  • Brian Alg spoke against using taxpayer money to fund a YMCA.

6:57 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • Set a general election for Nov. 5 to elect a mayor and city council member Place 2, established early voting locations and polling places and made provisions for conducting the election.
  • An inter-local agreement with Brazos County to conduct and manage College Station’s general election Nov. 5.
  • The first renewal of an annual $115,847 contract with DXI Industries for sodium hypochlorite for water services.
  • The first renewal of a contract not to exceed $5 million with Brazos Paving for base failure repairs and pavement treatments.
  • The removal of parking on both sides of Diamondback Drive between Arrington Road and 435 feet west of Oldham Oaks Avenue and both sides of Oldham Oaks Avenue between Diamondback and Crystal Ridge Court.
  • The removal of parking on the west side of Martin Wing Way between Diamondback and Pearl River Court, the east side of Martin Wing Way between Crystal Ridge and Diamondback, the south side of Crystal Ridge from Oldham Oaks to around the cul-de-sac, the north side of Crystal Ridge between Pearl River and Oldham Oaks, around the cul-de-sac and north side of Pearl River to Martin Wing Way, the north side of Pearl River between Martin Wing Way and Crystal Ridge, the south side of Pearl River from Crystal Ridge to around the cul-de-sac, the south side of Pearl River between 225 feet north of Crystal Ridge to 375 feet north of Crystal Ridge, and the north side of Pearl River between 345 feet south of Crystal Ridge and 275 feet south of Crystal Ridge.
  • The mutual termination of a tax abatement agreement and approval of an economic development agreement with Strategic Behavioral Health.
  • The sale of about seven acres in the College Station Business Center near the intersection of State Highway 6 and Gateway Boulevard.

7:05 p.m.

BVSWMA Budget

The council voted unanimously to approve the Brazos Valley Solid Waste Management Agency’s FY20 budget, which reduces the gate rate for the City of College Station and City of Bryan from $18.50 to $17.50 per ton.

The budget includes $6.8 million in operating expenses, $3.8 million in capital expenses, and $9.54 million in revenue.  Total reserves, cash, and investments are $11.23 million.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:13 p.m.

Street Name Changes

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to rename Greens Prairie Road West and Greens Prairie Trail to enhance emergency response efficiency.

The action changes Greens Prairie Road West to Victoria Avenue between Wellborn Road and Victoria, to Woodlake Drive between Victoria and Woodlake, and to Greens Prairie Road between Highway 6 and the city limits. Greens Prairie Trail between Wellborn and the city limits becomes Greens Prairie Road.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:18 p.m.

Multi-Family Parkland Dedication

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve modifications to the city’s parkland dedication program to make land dedication requirements proportional and less complex for multi-family developments.

The audit found that a cost-neutral conversion may be achieved by increasing the land dedication requirements from 49 bedrooms to 278 bedrooms per acre for neighborhood parks and 53 bedrooms to 305 bedrooms per acre for community parks.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:28 p.m.

Cain Road Crossing Closure

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to close the Cain Road crossing of the Union Pacific Railroad with the opening of the new Deacon Drive Union Pacific Railroad Crossing.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:33 p.m.

Southwood Sidewalk Project

The council voted unanimously to support and authorize a grant application to the Texas Department of Transportation for the Southwood Sidewalk Project to fill a sidewalk gap and help provide a safe route to schools between the Southwood Valley and South Knoll/Southside neighborhoods.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:58 p.m.

Brazos County MUD No. 2 Consent

The council voted unanimously to consent to the formation of Brazos County Municipal Utility District No. 2 and up to four additional municipal utility districts in the Millican Reserve development in the city’s extraterritorial jurisdiction along Peach Creek between Wellborn Road and Highway 6.

The MUDs will develop, operate, maintain, and issue bonds to finance infrastructure for the districts and levy and assess a tax on district properties to cover associated expenses.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:58 p.m.

Brazos County MUD No. 2 Partnership

The council conducted the first of two public hearings on a proposed strategic partnership agreement with Brazos County Municipal Utility District No. 2 that outlines conditions for district annexation and limited-purpose commercial annexation. No one spoke during the hearing.

The second public hearing is scheduled for the August 22 council meeting when the council can vote on the agreement.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:59 p.m.

Brazos County MUD No. 2 Utilities

The council voted unanimously to approve a utility agreement covering water, wastewater, and roads with Brazos County Municipal Utility District No. 2.

The MUD lies within the Wellborn Special Utility District for water service and itself provides for wastewater treatment and collection, including a treatment plant, shared sewer lines, and lift stations. Roads will be constructed to county standards and owned and maintained by the county.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:00 p.m.

Brazos County MUD No. 2 Development

The council voted unanimously to approve an agreement with Millican Land Development, RB Meadows, and Rock Barn Conservation Partners that regulates development in Brazos County Municipal Utility District No. 2. The agreement addresses land use, density, and compliance with standards comparable to development in the city.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:01 p.m.

After the council discussed and reviewed future agenda items, Mayor Mooney adjourned the regular meeting. The workshop meeting will resume.

8:04 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar and received committee reports. The council returned to executive session to discuss an additional item.

The council meets again on Thursday, Aug. 8.

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

If you found value in this blog post, please share it with your social network and friends!


		
	

5 things to watch at Monday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Monday at city hall for its workshop (5 p.m.) and regular (6 p.m.) meetings.

Here are five items to watch: (more…)


Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Sept. 27)

(L-R): Bob Brick, Linda Harvell, Jerome Rektorik, Karl Mooney (mayor), John Nichols, Barry Moore, James Benham.

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Sept. 27. It’s not the official minutes.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink channel 19 or online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:20 p.m.

The workshop has started. No action was taken out of executive session.

5:30 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled this consent item for workshop discussion:

  • Towing Ordinance: The proposed amendment would add any motor vehicle unlawfully parked or violating any city code may be towed at the owner’s or operator’s expense.

6:26 p.m.

Code Enforcement Ordinance Revisions

The council discussed possible amendments to city ordinances to provide more consistent code enforcement. Points of discussion include open storage, vegetation, right-of-way maintenance, abandoned shopping carts, and the parking or storing of recreational vehicles, trailers or trucks.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:38 p.m.

Mayor Karl Mooney adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar and received committee reports. The regular meeting will start after a short break.

6:47 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

6:50 p.m.

Proclamations

Mayor Mooney presented a proclamation for College Station firefighters’ “Fill the Boot” campaign to benefit the Muscular Dystrophy Association.

6:58 p.m.

Hear Visitors

Two people spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens might address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda.

  • James Benham recognized Marine Cpl. Richard Waller as part of the Fallen Heroes Memorial program. The 22-year-old Fort Worth native died April 7, 2006, while conducting combat operations in Al Anbar province, Iraq.
  • Justin Ikpo spoke about criminal behavior in his neighborhood.

7:00 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve these consent agenda items:

  • A BuyBoard contract purchase of $138,750 for traffic signal cabinets from Paradigm Traffic Systems Inc.
  • Renewal of a $230,000 Xpedient Mail contract for printing and mailing services.
  • The expenditure of funds for FY19 for items exempt from competitive bidding and other expenditures for inter-local contracts or fees mandated by state law that are greater than $100,000.
  • Adopted fees, rates and charges as provided by Chapter 2 of the city’s Code of Ordinances.
  • An increase the FY18 expenditure limit by $55,000 for a new FY 2018 expenditure limit of $145,000 for police uniforms, body armor and accessories from Miller Uniforms & Emblems.
  • Added language to city ordinances for towing unlawfully parked vehicles.
  • Amended city ordinances related to home solicitation.
  • A contract for the grant of federal HOME Investment Partnership Program Grant Community Housing Development Organization (CHDO) set-aside funds with Elder-Aid, Inc. in the amount of $200,000 for acquisition and rehabilitation of two dwelling units at 3416-3418 Normand to be used as affordable rental housing for income-eligible elderly households.
  • The $54,224.50 purchase of traffic signs, prefabricated signs and sign blanks from Vulcan Signs Inc. for and the $61,585 purchase of traffic sign hardware and posts from Dobie Supply.
  • An advance funding agreement with the State of Texas, acting through the Texas Department of Transportation, for the Cain/Deacon project.
  • Six master agreements for Real Estate Appraisal Services: Duff & Phelps, LLC; JLL Valuation & Advisory Services, LLC; Lowery Property Advisors, LLC; Paul Hornsby & Company; S.T. Lovett & Associates; Valbridge Property Advisors.
  • Amended the funding agreement with Experience Bryan College Station to increase the amount for FY18 by $194,423 for a total of $594,423 related to the CVB Grant Program.
  • The second reading on a non-exclusive pipeline franchise ordinance with Hawkwood Energy Midstream for pipeline facilities for transporting petroleum products and byproducts.
  • Amended the city’s Code of Ordinances regarding false alarm fees.
  • Amended the city’s Code of Ordinances regarding Fire Department and Planning and Development Services afterhours inspection fees.
  • Changes to guidelines for the city’s housing assistance program funded with grants from the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

 Council voted on this consent item separately and approved it unanimously:

  • FY19 premiums not to exceed $516,000 for excess liability and workers’ compensation insurance, property/boiler & machinery, commercial crime, EMT liability, auto property damage, cyber liability, unmanned aircraft liability and property, and special events policies.

7:08 p.m. 

FY18 Budget Amendment

After a public hearing, the council approved a $3.8 million amendment to the FY18 city budget. See pages 282-284 for a list of amended items.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:13 p.m. 

FY19 City Budget

The council unanimously approved the city budget for the 2018-19 fiscal year and ratified the increase in property tax revenue.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:20 p.m. 

FY19 Property Tax Rate

The council unanimously adopted a property tax rate of .505841 cents per $100 of assessed value for FY19, a .08341-cent increase from the FY18 rate.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:22 p.m. 

BVSWMA Board Appointment

The council unanimously appointed Mayor Mooney to another term on the BVSWMA Board of Directors.

7:24 p.m.

The council discussed and reviewed future agenda items.

7:24 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the meeting. The council meets again on Thursday, Oct. 11.

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


If you found value in this blog post, please share it with your social network and friends!


		
	

5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (5 p.m.) and regular (6 p.m.) meetings.

Here are five items to watch:

  1. Code Enforcement Revisions: In the workshop, The council will discuss possible amendments to city ordinances to provide more consistent code enforcement.
  2. Cain-Deacon Crossing Project: As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider an advanced funding agreement with the Texas Department of Transportation to cover work within the TxDOT right-of-way as part of the Cain Road/Deacon Drive Railroad Crossing Switch project.
  3. FY18 Budget Amendment: After a public hearing, the council will consider a $3.8 million amendment to the FY18 city budget. See pages 282-284 of the council packet for a complete list of amended items.
  4. FY19 City Budget Adoption: The council will consider approving the city budget for the 2018-19 fiscal year and ratifying the increase in property tax revenue.
  5. FY19 Property Tax Rate Adoption: The council will consider adopting a property tax rate of .505841 cents per $100 of assessed value, a .08341-cent increase from the FY18 rate.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Channels 19 or online. We’ll post a detailed live blog on this site.

Related Links:                                                                 

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


If you found value in this blog post, please share it with your social network and friends!


		
	

Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Sept. 13)

(L-R): Bob Brick, Linda Harvell, Jerome Rektorik, Karl Mooney (mayor), John Nichols, Barry Moore, James Benham.

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Sept. 13. It’s not the official minutes.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink channel 19 or online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:05 p.m.

The workshop has started. No action was taken out of executive session.

5:14 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled these consent items for workshop discussion:

  • Wellborn-Holleman Intersection Project: The $382,122 contract with Binkley & Barfield is for engineering services related to the design of the Wellborn Road-Holleman Intersection Project. Wellborn Road will be elevated to reduce the grade difference with the railroad crossing. Holleman will be widened to accommodate dedicated right and left turn lanes in both directions. The city will manage design and TxDOT will manage bidding and construction.
  • Hawkwood Energy Water Contract: The two-year contract will allow Hawkwood Energy to pump water from ponds on the Hanson South property. Hawkwood will bear the costs and pay the city 10 cents a barrel with a contractual guarantee for at least $150,000 in the contract’s initial year.
  • Hawkwood Energy Franchise: This is the first reading of a non-exclusive pipeline franchise ordinance for oil or gas operations with Hawkwood Energy Midstream, which will pay the city an annual franchise fee of $1 per linear foot of the pipeline franchise area, plus an annual fee of $1,000 for each road or street boring/crossing.

5:22 p.m.

False Fire Alarm Fees

The consensus of the council was to allow the Fire Department to charge a fee for more than three false alarms in 12 months. The Police Department has had false alarm fees in place for several years. The proposed fees range from $85 for four or five false alarms to $143.65 for eight or more alarms.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

5:27 p.m.

After-Hours Fire Inspections

The consensus of the council was to allow the Fire Department to charge $75 per hour for requests for inspections anytime other than weekdays from 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

5:29 p.m.

Mayor Karl Mooney adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar and received committee reports. The regular meeting will start at 6 p.m.

6:00 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

6:06 p.m.

Thank a Police Officer Day

Mayor Mooney proclaimed Sept. 15 as Thank a Police Officer Day. 

6:12 p.m.

Constitution Week

Mayor Mooney proclaimed Sept. 17-23 as Constitution Week

6:19 p.m.

Historical Marker No. 96

The Historic Preservation Committee presented Historical Marker No. 96 for the home at 1106 Carolina St. 

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:30 p.m.

Hear Visitors

Three people spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens might address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda.

  • James Benham recognized Marine Lance Cpl. Seth Huston as part of the Fallen Heroes Memorial program. The 19-year-old Perryton native died Aug. 21, 2004, due to enemy action in Iraq.
  • Mary Troy and Susan Adams spoke against closing the Ringer Library for eight months (November-June) during heavy construction work that’s part of its renovation and expansion.

6:31 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • A contract not to exceed $2.04 million with Kirksey Architecture for the design of a new city hall building.
  • A $382,122.55 contract with Binkley & Barfield for engineering services related to the design of the FM2154 and Holleman Intersection Project.
  • The second renewal of a $259,978.42 contract with Andrews Building Service for janitorial services for city facilities and the Northgate District.
  • A temporary all-way stop at the intersection of Keefer Loop and Rock Prairie Road West during construction of the Holleman Drive South construction project.
  • A $4.26 million contract with Primoris T&D Services for construction of the Graham Road Substation.
  • A contract with Hawkwood Energy to purchase pond water from the city’s water wellfield property called Hanson South.
  • The first renewal of annual copy and print services blanket orders not to exceed $120,000 with AlphaGraphics ($80,000) and Copy Corner ($40,000).
  • The first reading on a non-exclusive pipeline franchise ordinance for oil or gas operations with Hawkwood Energy Midstream to construct, operate, maintain, remove, replace and repair pipeline facilities for the transportation of petroleum products and byproducts.
  • The second renewal of a $256,384 contract with Utility Restoration Services for padmount equipment repair and restoration.
  • FY18 funding of $1,073,572 to the Public Agency Retirement Services OPEB Trust.
  • A $101,248.30 contract with Hurricane Fence Company to replace the security fencing at three city water well facilities along Sandy Point Road.
  • A negotiated settlement between the Atmos Cities Steering Committee and Atmos Energy Mid-Tex Division regarding the company’s 2018 rate review mechanism filings and a settlement agreement.

6:43 p.m.

Tax Rate Public Hearing

The council conducted the final public hearing on the city’s proposed FY19 tax rate of.505841 cents per $100 of assessed value. The .8341-cent increase would offset the revenue loss from the five percent homestead exemption the council approved earlier this year.

Two people spoke against the tax increase in the public hearing.

The council will vote on the tax rate on Sept. 27.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:45 p.m.

FY19 Budget Public Hearing

The council conducted the final public hearing on the city’s FY19 budget, which totals $360.68 million. The council will vote on the budget on Sept. 27.

No one spoke during the public hearing.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:47 p.m.

Church Street Easement Abandonment

After a public hearing, the council voted 6-0 approved the abandonment of a 15-foot wide public utility easement at 603 Church Ave. to accommodate the expansion of St. Mary’s Church. Councilman John Nichols abstained.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:10 p.m.

Single-Family Parking

After a public hearing, the council voted 6-1 to amend the city’s Unified Development Ordinance to remove the cap of requiring no more than four parking spaces for a single-family dwelling unit in areas designated Neighborhood Conservation in the Comprehensive Plan. The cap will remain for other areas.

Councilwoman Linda Harvell voted against the motion.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:25 p.m.

BioCorridor Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted 6-0 to approve a request to amend the terms and development standards for the BioCorridor Planned Development District, which covers about 147 acres between State Highway 47, Raymond Stotzer Parkway, Turkey Creek Parkway, and the city limit. Councilman Barry Moore abstained.

The action amended Sec. 1.2.d to add “Stand-alone multi-family on property located between Turkey Creek Road and the proposed Atlas Pear Drive extension” and Sec. 1.2.e to add to the prohibition, “Multi-Family not part of a mixed-used development except as otherwise allowed in Sec. 1.2.d.”

The remaining sections will be sent back to the BioCorridor Board for review.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:32 p.m.

The council discussed and reviewed future agenda items.

8:32 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the meeting. The council meets again on Thursday, Sept. 27.

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

If you found value in this blog post, please share it with your social network and friends!

 


Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Aug. 9)

(L-R): Bob Brick, Linda Harvell, Jerome Rektorik, Karl Mooney (mayor), John Nichols, Barry Moore, James Benham.

By Jay Socol, Public Communications Director

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Aug. 9. It’s not the official minutes.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink channel 19 or online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

Bear with me, folks — usual blogger Colin Killian is out tonight, so I’ll do my best to keep up. -jgs

Complete agendas and background materials
Previous city council meeting blogs

5:08 p.m.

The workshop has started. No action was taken out of executive session.

Councilman James Benham is participating by teleconference.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled these consent items for workshop discussion:

  • Approving an interlocal agreement with Brazos County for the conduct and management of the College Station general and special election to be held on Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018.
  • A construction contract with DKing Express LLC for $141,399 for repairs to the two existing sand volleyball courts at Barracks Park.
  • A contract with Brazos Paving Inc for base failure repairs and Type-D HMAC installation in an amount not to exceed $5,000,000.
  • Renewal of the interlocal agreement with the City of Bryan for management of the Larry J. Ringer Public Library.

5:20 p.m.

FY 2018-19 Proposed Budget

Staff presented main points of the proposed budget that council members will discuss in greater detail during upcoming budget workshops (Aug. 20-22). The full proposed budget can be viewed here. Among tonight’s highlights:

  • The proposed budget is $360,680,102 (1.37% lower than FY18)
  • Budget reflects a 5% homestead exemption voted on by council in June.
  • To remain revenue neutral due to the homestead exemption, a tax increase of 0.8341 cent per $100 valuation is included in the proposed budget.
  • A 5% increase to the wastewater rate would begin in October to keep up with capital system improvements due to growth and aging infrastructure.
  • Pay increase for police to ensure market competitiveness, as well as a pay increase structure for fire personnel. Also funds for more police body cameras, and fire vehicles and rescue equipment.
  • Funding for facility maintenance, street maintenance, implementation of neighborhood plans, construction of Southeast Park and renovations throughout the parks system.
  • Street and transportation capital projects, including Greens Prairie Road and Greens Prairie Trail extensions, Royder Road Phase III, and Cain/Deacon railroad crossing relocation.
  • Library expansion, new police station, initial phases of new city hall, and renovations to create a senior and community center at Dartmouth/Colgate.
  • Advanced Meter Infrastructure implementation for CSU-Electric.
  • Continued implementation of new pay structure with necessary salary adjustments + 1.5% pool for merit-based increases.

Public hearings on the proposed tax rate will occur on Sept. 5 and Sept. 13, and a public hearing on the proposed budget will also occur on Sept. 13. Adoption of the budget and tax rate is scheduled for Sept. 27. The new fiscal year begins Oct. 1.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

 

5:36 p.m.

Neighborhood Conservation Overlay process

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

 

6:20 p.m.

After considerable discussion among council members and city staff, Mayor Mooney suspended the workshop meeting since it was running long. The regular meeting will begin after a short break and then council will resume its workshop meeting.

6:30 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

6:32 p.m.

Camp Kesem Week (Aug. 12-17) at Texas A&M University was recognized by Mayor Karl Mooney. Pictured with Mayor Mooney are students Samantha Buchanan and Hannah Lykins.

councilpresentationkesem8-9-18

6:36 p.m.

Hear Visitors

During the Hear Visitors portion of the meeting, citizens are able to address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda.

  • Mr. Fred Dupriest, representing the College Station Association of Neighborhoods (CSAN), addressed the council about the neighborhood conservation overlay process. Here is his PowerPoint presentation:

 

  • Mr. Jerry Cooper complimented city staff on the efforts undertaken toward ensuring a fair neighborhood conservation overlay process.
  • Mr. Buck Prewitt expressed his desire for additional clarification about specific parts of the NCO process, realizing that the council is unable to respond to citizen comments during this portion of the meeting.

 

6:56 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda, with the exception of item 2b, which relates to ordering a general and special election for two city council races and placement of multiple proposed amendments to the city’s charter. That item will be voted on separately. Items passed unanimously:

  • Ordinance, in part, ordering a general and special election on Nov. 6, 2018 to elect city council members to Places 4 and 6, and to submit proposed amendments to the city’s charter.
  • Approving interlocal agreement with Brazos County for the conduct and management of the City of College Station General and Special Election that will be held on Tuesday, November 6, 2018.
  • Resolution of the interlocal agreement with the City of Bryan, City of Brenham, Brazos County, Washington County, Texas A&M University, Grimes County and Brazos Valley Council of Governments; designating the Brazos Valley Council of Governments as the Managing Entity for the Brazos Valley Wide Area Communications System (BVWACS)
  • A construction contract with Kieschnick General Contractors, in the amount
    of $830,078 for the construction of the State Highway 6 waterline phases I and II.
  • Calling a public hearing on the City of College Station FY 2018-2019 Proposed Budget for Thursday, September 13, 2018 at 6:00 PM in the City Hall Council Chambers.
  • A bid award for the annual purchase of single phase pad-mounted transformers, which will be maintained in electrical inventory and expended as needed. The total recommended award is $224,500 to Priester-Mell & Nicholson, Inc.
  • An amendment to the lease agreement with CEO, Etc., Inc. for lease of City Fiber Optic Cable Facilities.
  • Approval of the construction contract with DKing Express, LLC. in the amount of $141,399 for repairs to the two existing sand volleyball courts at the Barracks Park.
  • A bid award for the annual blanket order for electric meters and sockets, to be stored in inventory.
  • Approval of a resolution adopting the proposed FY 2019 Community Development Budget and PY 2018 Annual Action Plan.
  • The second reading of a franchise agreement with Organix Recycling, LLC.; for the collection of recyclables from commercial businesses and multi-family locations.
  • The approval of a contract with Brazos Paving, Inc. for base failure repairs and Type D HMAC installation in an amount not to exceed $5,000,000.
  • Amending the Code of Ordinances and a resolution that established the fees, rates, and charges regarding establishing fees for the regulation of dockless bike share programs permitted to operate in the City.
  • A letter agreement for year 1 of the Professional Auditing Services engagement with BKD, LLP for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2018 with expenditures totaling $84,000.
  • Renewal of the Interlocal Agreement with the City of Bryan for Management of the
    Larry J. Ringer Library.
  • A bid award for the annual purchase of sodium hypochlorite, the liquid-chlorine
    disinfection product used to treat the potable water supply at the Sandy Point Pump Station.

 

Place-5 Councilman John Nichols read a prepared statement opposing consent item 2b. due to his objection to the proposed charter amendment that would extend council terms from three to four years, and holding elections only during even-numbered years. By a vote of 6 in favor and 1 abstention (Nichols), item 2b passed.

7:15 p.m.

Rezoning from Planned Development District to Wellborn Restricted Suburban

This proposed rezoning applies to 21 acres of land located just south of the intersection of Greens Prairie Road West and Royder Road. Council approved this item by a vote of 7-0.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

 

Appointments to the Zoning Board of Adjustments

Mr. James Sharp was appointed by council to fill an unexpired term on the ZBA.

7:23 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the regular meeting. The workshop meeting has resumed with item #6, an amendment to the Unified Development Ordinance related to the neighborhood conservation overlay process.

Among the council’s direction to staff was to sufficiently notify all residents who may be part of planned meetings related to an NCO effort, as well as those who may live or own property in proximity of such planned meetings. Among the council suggestions was the burden of mail notification being on city staff via the applicant paying a “notification fee,” rather than an application fee, to only cover those hard costs.

There was also great interest among some council members in giving neighborhoods seeking an NCO to have as many options available to them as possible as they construct their petition to the city.

Staff will take council’s collective direction and bring back a revised ordinance to the Planning & Zoning Commission, and then again to the city council.

8:25 p.m.

Meeting is adjourned.

 


About the Blogger

Jay Socol (@jaysocol) is in his ninth year as College Station’s public communications director. A 1991 graduate of Texas A&M. Jay has also been communications director for the Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service, public information officer for the City of Bryan, and news director at several Bryan-College Station area radio stations. A native of Breckenridge, TX, he also serves as immediate past-president of the Texas Association of Municipal Information Officers.


If you found value in this blog post, please share it with your social network and friends!


5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (5 p.m.) and regular (6 p.m.) meetings.

Here are five items to watch:

  1. Proposed FY19 City Budget: In the workshop, the council will get its first look at the city’s proposed budget for the 2019 fiscal year. After a series of budget workshops (Aug. 20-22) and public hearings on the tax rate (Sept. 5) and budget (Sept. 13), the council is scheduled to adopt the budget Sept. 27.
  2. Neighborhood Conservation Overlay Districts: Another workshop item is a continued discussion about clarifying the process for establishing Neighborhood Conservation Overlay Districts as well as options to change that section of the city’s Unified Development Ordinance.
  3. State Highway 6 Water Line: As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider an $830,078 contract for construction of water lines from the intersection of State Highway 6 and William D. Fitch Parkway to Venture Drive and from the future intersection of Pebble Creek Parkway to St. Joseph Urgent Care.
  4. Community Development Budget and Action Plan: Another consent agenda item is the Fiscal Year 2019 Community Development Budget and Program Year 2018 Action Plan, which includes objectives and recommendations for projects and programs that support the low-to-moderate income population.
  5. Wellborn Rezoning: After a public hearing, the council will consider a request to change the zoning from Planned Development District to Wellborn Restricted Suburban for about 21 acres south of the Greens Prairie Road West-Royder Road intersection.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Channels 19 or online. We’ll post a detailed live blog on this site.

Related Links:                                                                 

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


If you found value in this blog post, please share it with your social network and friends!


		
	

Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (July 26)

(L-R): Bob Brick, Linda Harvell, Jerome Rektorik, Karl Mooney (mayor), John Nichols, Barry Moore, James Benham.

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, July 26. It’s not the official minutes.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink channel 19 or online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:26 p.m.

The workshop has started. No action was taken out of executive session.

Councilmen Bob Brick and James Benham are participating by teleconference. Councilman Jerome Rekrotik is absent tonight.

5:35 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled these consent items for workshop discussion:

  • Carters Creek Wastewater Plant Improvements: The $608,000 contract is for design and construction phase services for centrifuge improvements at the Carters Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant.
  • East Side Sewer and Lift Station: The $267,000 contract is for design and construction phase services for the East Side Sewer and Lift Station Project.

5:47 p.m.

BVSWMA Budget

The council unanimously endorsed the Brazos Valley Solid Waste Management Agency’s FY19 budget, which includes $8.64 million in revenue, $6.42 million in operating expenses, and $3.67 million in capital expenses. Total reserves, cash, and investments are $11.75 million.

The budget also reduces the gate rate for the cities of Bryan and College Station from $20 to $18.50 per ton.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:07 p.m.

Texas Weekend of Remembrance

After reviewing the 2018 Texas Weekend of Remembrance, the council directed staff to continue plans for 2019.

The TWR is a time for military members, veterans, and their families to come together and honor the memory of their lost loved ones through camaraderie and commemoration of their sacrifice. The Memorial Day weekend event allows everyone to show their pride and respect for the men and women who paid the ultimate price.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:08 p.m.

Mayor Karl Mooney suspended the workshop. The regular meeting will start after a short break.

6:13 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

6:34 p.m.

Historical Markers

The Historic Preservation Committee presented historical markers to St. Matthew Baptist Church (409 Holleman Dr.), Pleasant Grove Baptist Church (1216 Detroit St.), Sterling Whitley (500 Holleman Dr.), Thomas & Sharon Merchant (1102 Detroit St.), Bobby Searcy & Adrian Merchant (1106 Phoenix St.), and Rudell Baker-Wilson (1202 Phoenix St.).

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:39 p.m.

Hear Visitors

One person spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens might address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda.

  • Ann Marsh spoke about ways the city can solve issues caused by trash containers.

6:41 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • An amendment to the Solid Waste Facilities Operations Agreement with BVSWMA that governs communications and procedures during extended periods of landfill inaccessibility.
  • The first reading of a franchise agreement with Organix Recycling for the collection of recyclables from commercial businesses and multi-family locations.
  • A contract with Pebble Creek Interests for easements needed for the Lick Creek Parallel Wastewater Trunk Line Project.
  • A contract with Aggieland Properties for land needed for the State Highway 47 Electric Substation Project.
  • A second amendment to the lease agreement with Wirestar that increases the leased fiber optic strand miles to 88.74.
  • An annual price agreement not to exceed $1,873,500 with Knife River ($1.44 million) and BPI Material ($438,000) for Type D hot mix asphalt for the maintenance of streets
  • A $209,656 contract with CF McDonald Electric to install purchased VFDs at Sandy Point Pump Station.
  • The removal of parking on the west side of Boyett Street beginning 60 feet north of the intersection of University Drive and ending 130 feet north of University Drive on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights.
  • The creation of a passenger loading zone in the Northgate Promenade Parking Lot to help address pedestrian safety and traffic congestion issues. The loading zone would be in place from 9 p.m.-3 a.m.
  • Changed the definition of a junked vehicle in the city’s Code of Ordinances to align with the Texas Transportation Code. The amendment also transfers cost responsibility
  • to remove a junked vehicle from the city to the owner.
  • A $60,000 change order for the contractor to bore under Wellborn Road and the railroad track to build an additional feeder to the Jones Crossing development.
  • A $608,000 contract with Jones and Carter for design and construction phase services for the Carters Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant Centrifuge Improvements Project.
  • A $267,000 contract with Jones and Carter for design and construction phase services for the East Side Sewer and Lift Station Project.
  • A contract not to exceed $120,000 with Krause Paint and Body Shop for heavy truck paint and body repairs.
  • A $800,077.30 bid award for annual blanket purchase agreements for electrical items: KBS Electrical Distributors ($100,044.30), Wesco Distributors ($41,898), Texas Electric Cooperatives ($119,737.50), Techline ($509,373.50), and Anixter ($29,024).

This item was moved to the Aug. 9 council meeting:

  • Renewal of the inter-local agreement with the City of Bryan for management of the Larry J. Ringer Library.

6:55 p.m.

Committee Term Lengths and Limits

After a public hearing, the council unanimously voted to change the term lengths for appointees to various city boards, commissions, and committees to three years – except for the Planning & Zoning Commission – and to remove term limits that aren’t required by law. Planning and Zoning commissioners will continue to be limited to two terms.

The modifications are a response to the declining number of citizens applying to serve. 

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:09 p.m.

Fun for All Playground

The council unanimously approved a $942,123 construction contract for the first phase of an all-abilities park at Central Park. The Fun for All Playground will be a fully accessible park that will provide inclusive play for everyone.

The improvements will be funded primarily by civic groups and private citizens. Phase 1 includes a playground, swings, splash pad, parking, fencing, and general infrastructure.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:10 p.m.

The council discussed and reviewed future agenda items.

7:10 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the meeting. The workshop will resume after a short break.

7:17 p.m.

The workshop has resumed.

8:21 p.m.

Possible City Charter Amendments

The council discussed possible city charter amendments that may be included in a special election in November: They approved the following items for the ballot:

  • Expand the terms from three to four years for mayor and city council members with regular elections in even-numbered years.
  • Expansion of residency requirement for the city manager and city attorney to allow them to live in the extraterritorial jurisdiction.
  • The mandatory appointment of an internal auditor.
  • Add language permitting the city to specify by ordinance the notice required for competitive bids and proposals.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:23 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar and received committee reports. The council meets again on Thursday, Aug. 9.

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

If you found value in this blog post, please share it with your social network and friends!



	

Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (May 24)

(L-R): Bob Brick, Linda Harvell, Jerome Rektorik, Karl Mooney (mayor), John Nichols, Barry Moore, James Benham.

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, May 24. It’s not the official minutes.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink channel 19 or online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:32 p.m.

The workshop has started. Mayor Karl Mooney is absent tonight. Mayor Pro Tem James Benham will preside. No action was taken out of executive session.

5:33 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. No consent items were pulled for workshop discussion.

5:56 p.m.

Northgate Pedestrian Safety

The council heard a presentation about temporary measures to enhance pedestrian safety in the Northgate area, including the closing of Boyett Street at University Drive on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights. An ongoing comprehensive study will help determine permanent changes.

Here are the PowerPoint presentations:

6:13 p.m.

Texas 4-H Horse Show

The council unanimously approved $25,000 in College Station Hotel Occupancy Tax (HOT) funds per year to support the Brazos County Expo Center’s bid to host the Texas State 4-H Horse Show for the next five years. 

Other possible funding partners and their annual HOT fund commitment are Experience BCS ($35,000), the City of Bryan for ($25,000) Brazos County ($50,000), and Expo Rewards Program ($12,000). The combined commitment for all partners is $147,000 per year for a total of $735,000 over five years.

The Texas State 4-H Horse Show is an eight-day event in July. The Abilene Convention and Visitors Bureau estimated an economic impact of $887,400 and 1,416 room nights for the 2017 show in Abilene. For the 2019 event, Experience BCS estimates an economic impact of $809,884 with 2,000 hotel room nights.

6:16 p.m.

Mayor Pro Tem Benham adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar and received committee reports. The regular meeting will start immediately.

6:16 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

6:24 p.m.

Hear Visitors

Three people spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens might address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda.

  • The president of the Woodland Hills Homeowners Association spoke about maintaining the trees as a buffer between the subdivision and Lowe’s.
  • A resident spoke about issues with development in her Woodlands Hills neighborhood.
  • A resident spoke about the importance of trees and green areas in maintaining a healthy environment.

6:24 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • Renewal of a contract with the Texas Department of State Health Services, Vital Statistics and a data use agreement for access to confidential information.
  • The $135,814.39 purchase of new grounds maintenance equipment from Professional Turf Products for the Parks and Recreation Department.
  • The Semi-Annual Report on Small Area Impact Fees and System-Wide Impact Fees for Water, Wastewater, and Roadway.
  • A three-year, $1.2 million contract with SEL Engineering Services for electrical engineering services.
  • An ordinance repealing and terminating the Medical District Tax Increment Reinvestment Zone.
  • A $600,000 real estate contract for property for the planned Fire Station No. 7.
  • The second restatement of the inter-local agreement with the City of Bryan, City of Brenham, Brazos County, Washington County, Texas A&M University, and Grimes County for the construction, acquisition, implementation, operation, and maintenance of the Brazos Valley Wide Area Communications System.
  • A $337,182.47 general services agreement with ASAP Security Solutions for a video surveillance system in the Northgate District and in the Northgate Parking Garage.

6:31 p.m.

FY18 Budget Amendment

After a public hearing, the council unanimously approved a $4.13 million amendment to the city’s FY18 budget. Most of the amendment covers Phase II of the Veterans Park & Athletic Complex Build-Out ($1.55 million), the Fun for All Playground ($1 million), a design contract for Southeast Park ($400,000), and land for a new fire station.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:34 p.m.

Wellborn Road-Royder Road Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council unanimously approved a request to change the zoning designation from Planned Development District and Suburban Commercial to Wellborn Commercial for about four acres at the intersection of Wellborn Road and the future Royder Road.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:37 p.m.

Wellborn Road Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council unanimously approved a request to change the zoning designation from Rural to Wellborn Commercial for about 4.4 acres south of the Wellborn Road-Greens Prairie Road intersection.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:01 p.m.

College Station Business Center

After a public hearing, the council unanimously approved the College Station Business Center Development Plan, formerly known as the Spring Creek Corporate Campus.The Spring Creek Local Government Corporation will work with staff to implement the next phases of the Business Center, including platting, infrastructure design, deed restrictions, development standards, naming, signage, and branding.

The plan includes the development of about 250 acres of city-owned property along the east side of State Highway 6 South, north of W.D. Fitch Parkway, and south of Lick Creek.

The city began purchasing property in the area almost 20 years ago for the eventual development of a business park. The city owns about 485 acres, including significant areas of preserved greenway. The council’s Economic Development Committee and the Spring Creek Local Government Corporation have jointly overseen the development plan process.

The plan acts as an internal guide for the development of the business park and includes assessment of existing conditions, flexible land planning, potential industry targets, infrastructure demands and financing, and marketing and branding efforts. Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:02 p.m.

The council discussed and reviewed future agenda items.

7;02 p.m.

Mayor Pro Tem Benham adjourned the meeting. The council meets again on Thursday, June 14.

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

If you found value in this blog post, please share it with your social network and friends!


		
	

5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (5 p.m.) and regular (6 p.m.) meetings.

Here are five items to watch:

  1. Northgate Pedestrian Safety: The council will hear a workshop presentation on proposals for temporary measures to enhance pedestrian safety in the Northgate area, including the closing of Boyett Street at University Drive on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights. An ongoing comprehensive study will help determine permanent changes.
  2. Fire Station No. 7 Property: As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider a $600,000 real estate contract to purchase about four acres on Wellborn Road for the city’s seventh fire station. The item is part of the budget amendment on the regular meeting agenda.
  3. Northgate Video Surveillance: Also on the consent agenda is a $337,000 general services agreement with ASAP Security Solutions for the first phase of a video surveillance system in the Northgate District and Northgate Parking Garage.
  4. FY18 Budget Amendment: After a public hearing, the council will consider a $4.13 million amendment to the city’s FY18 budget. Most of the amendment covers Phase II of the Veterans Park & Athletic Complex Build-Out ($1.55 million), the Fun for All Playground ($1 million), a design contract for Southeast Park ($400,000), and land for a new fire station.
  5. Rezonings on Wellborn Road: After public hearings, the council will consider requests to rezoning two properties along Wellborn Road south of Greens Prairie Road to allow for commercial development. One is for about four acres, and the other is for 4.4 acres.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Channels 19 or online. We’ll post a detailed live blog on this site.

Related Links:                                                                 

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


If you found value in this blog post, please share it with your social network and friends!


		
	

Live Blog: Monday’s city council meetings (Sept. 25)

Back (L-R): Linda Harvell, Jerome Rektorik, James Benham, Barry Moore. Front (L-R): Blanche Brick, Mayor Karl Mooney, Julie Schultz.

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Monday, Sept. 25. It’s not the official minutes.

The meeting is being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channels 19 and 119 (HD) and online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

6:26 p.m.

The workshop has started. Council took no action out of executive session. Councilman James Benham is absent tonight.

6:54 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled these consent items for workshop discussion:

  • Research Valley Partnership Bylaws: In June, the RVP voted to amend its bylaws. College Station, Bryan, Brazos County and other oversight entities must approve any changes to the bylaws concerning the appointment and qualifications of directors. A provision allows Texas A&M to join the RVP as a full-funding partner. Existing full-funding partners are the cities of Bryan, College Station and Brazos County, which invest about $350,000 each per year.
  • Hot Mix Asphalt Contract: Four sealed competitive bids were received and opened in August 2015, and Brazos Paving was the lowest responsible bidder. The total contract award for Type D hot mix asphalt is $2,990,750 and the emulsion is $22,800 for a total not to exceed $3,013,550 for materials to be installed on city streets as needed. This is the second of two possible one-year renewals.
  • Royder Road Interlocal Agreement: Due to the traffic impact of the proposed Wellborn Middle School, the need for a traffic signal at Greens Prairie Trail and Royder, a right-turn deceleration lane into the school, and the associated utility relocations were added to the city’s planned roadway project. A total budget of $4.93 million is included for this project in the Streets Capital Improvement Projects Fund. CSISD will reimburse the city up to $450,000 for the deceleration lane, traffic signal improvements, and necessary utility relocations.
  • Arrington Road Interlocal Agreement: The agreement allows Brazos County to finance the improvements to Arrington Road in the College Station city limits. The county will provide property acquisition, grading, drainage, flexible base/asphalt pavement, pavement markings, permanent vegetation, and appropriate signage and maintenance.
  • Hands-Free Ordinance Repeal: A new state law preempts a city ordinance that prohibits the use of a hand-held electronic communication device while driving. The Texas law simply bans texting while driving.
  • Dark Fiber Lease Agreement: On March 26, 2015, council approved an Ordinance permitting the lease of city fiber optic cable facilities. This item is the second lease authorized by the ordinance. The lease will have a financial impact on the city since modest revenue will be obtained from fiber or conduit leases.

7:22 p.m.

Affordable Housing Update

The council reviewed the city’s efforts and programs to promote affordable housing.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:25 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar and received committee reports. The regular meeting will start after a short break.

7:32 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

7:40 p.m.

Joe Orr, Inc. cited as Texas Treasure Business

Joe Orr, Inc. was recognized by Mayor Mooney for receiving a Texas Treasure Business Award from the Texas Historical Commission. Joe Orr is one of only 383 businesses from across the state to make this prestigious list, which pays tribute to businesses that have provided employment opportunities and support to the state’s economy for 50 years or more. Pictured below with Mayor Mooney is Henry Mayo, Joe Orr’s vice president.

Here’s Mr. Mayo’s PowerPoint presentation:

7:45 p.m.

Hear Visitors

Two people spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens might address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda.

  • Ben Roper recognized Marine Lance Cpl. Pedro Contreras as part of the Fallen Heroes Memorial Program.  The 27-year-old from Harris, Texas, died from hostile fire on June 21, 2004, in Al Anbar Province, Iraq.
  • Casey Oldham introduced Matt Prochaska as president and CEO of the Research Valley Partnership.

7:52 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve these consent agenda items:

  • Modifications to Article III of the Bylaws of the Research Valley Partnership, Inc.
  • FY18 funds for items exempt from competitive bidding as described in the Texas Local Government Code and other expenditures for interlocal contracts or fees mandated by state law greater than $100,000.
  • First renewal of a $256,078.42 annual contract with Andrews Building Service for janitorial services for city facilities and the Northgate District.
  • An interlocal agreement for the cost participation by the College Station Independent School District in the Royder Road Widening Phase I Project.
  • Prohibited left turns for vehicles traveling northbound on Brothers Boulevard into the Southwood Valley parent pick-up and drop-off driveway 815 feet north of Deacon Drive.
  • An interlocal agreement with Brazos County regarding Arrington Road.
  • Authorized the city manager or his designee to execute documents necessary for a grant application for Criminal Justice Division funds from the Officer of the Governor.
  • Prohibited parking on the west side of Boyett Street beginning 60 feet north of the intersection with University Drive and ending 130 feet north of University Drive.
  • An amendment to the Brazos Valley Wide Area Communications System interlocal agreement that adds Grimes County as a BVWACS party.
  • A bid award not to exceed $479,168 for the annual blanket purchase of three-phase pad-mounted transformers.
  • An annual water meter purchase of a maximum amount of $463,000 with National Meter & Automation, Inc.
  • Repealed the city ordinance regarding the use of wireless communication devices while operating a motor vehicle or bicycle.
  • A license agreement with Lakeridge Living for a 69.55-square-foot encroachment into the public utility easement located at 1198 Jones Butler Road.
  • An agreement for CEO, Etc., to lease city fiber optic cable facilities.
  • FY17 funding of $1,493,809 to Public Agency Retirement Services (PARS) OPEB trust.
  • FY18 insurance premiums not to exceed $500,223 for excess liability and workers’ compensation, property/boiler & machinery, commercial crime, EMT liability, auto property damage, cyber liability and special events policies.

This item was pulled for a separate vote:

  • The council voted 5-1 to approve an annual contract not to exceed $3,013,550 with Brazos Paving for Type D hot mix asphalt and emulsion. Councilwoman Julie Schultz voted against the motion.

7:58 p.m.

FY17 Budget Amendment No. 3

After a public hearing, the council unanimously approved Budget Amendment No. 3, which amends the FY17 budget by $114,357 and includes a contingency transfer of up to $400,000 to cover expenses related to hurricanes Harvey and Maria.

The amendment includes $49,957 to cover expenses incurred by members of the Police Department to participate in the presidential inauguration in January. Another $4,000 is for expenses for a homicide investigation seminar hosted by CSPD. Funds for both of those items were subsequently reimbursed.

In addition, the Fleet Maintenance Fund is expected to be over budget by about $60,000 because of unexpected expenses for parts, repairs, and overtime.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:03 p.m.

FY18 Budget Adoption

The council voted unanimously to adopt the city’s $365.7 million budget for FY18 and 5-1 to ratify a $5.8 million increase in property tax revenue. Councilman Jerome Rektorik voted against the ratification.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:11 p.m.

FY18 Tax Rate Adoption

The council voted 5-1 to adopt the FY18 property tax rate of 49.75 cents per $100 of assessed valuation, which includes .220339 cents for debt service and .277161 cents for operations and maintenance. Councilman Jerome Rektorik voted against the motion.

The 2½-cent increase from FY17 is entirely on the debt side and will be used to fund a new police station. The new rate is expected to generate about $43.3 million to fund the city’s general debt service and part of its operations and maintenance costs.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

Councilwoman Linda Harvell was not feeling well and has left the meeting.

8:18 p.m.

Utility Rate Ordinance Modification

The council voted 5-0 to implement two changes to utility fees and rates. 

The first change establishes a unified account creation fee and deletes the existing connection fees that cause confusion and are not compatible with the city’s new billing system. The change simplifies the fee to create an account with College Station Utilities. The next item on tonight’s agenda establishes the amount of the account creation fee, which is revenue neutral.

The second change implements a council decision from November to add a 50 percent surcharge to water and sewer customers in Brazos County Municipal Utility District No. 1, also known as the Speedway MUD or Southern Point development. The surcharge will help offset the cost of adding utility capacity to meet the development’s demands. It provides the same revenue as impact fees would but stretches it over 20 years.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:23 p.m.

Fitch-Rock Prairie Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted 5-0 to approve a request to change the zoning designation from Rural to Suburban Commercial, Estate and Natural Areas Protected for about 35 acres northwest of the intersection of William D. Fitch Parkway and Rock Prairie Road. The change will allow for development. 

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

9:06 p.m.

Rezoning East of Emerald Forest

After a public hearing, the council voted 5-0 to deny a request to change the zoning designation from Rural to Restricted Suburban and Natural Areas Protected for about 46 acres east of the Emerald Forest Subdivision near the Carters Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant. The change would have allowed for a single-family residential development.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

9:09 p.m.

Northgate Easement Abandonment

After a public hearing, the council voted 5-0 to abandon a public utility easement at 203 First St. to allow for the development of the mobile food truck park in Northgate.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

9:13 p.m.

Associates Avenue Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted 5-0 to approve a request to change the zoning designation from Commercial Industrial to Multi-Family and Natural Areas Protected for about six acres on Associates Avenue behind Sam’s. The change will allow for a multi-family residential development.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

9:17 p.m.

Barron Cut-Off Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted 4-0 to approve a request to change the zoning designation from Rural to General Suburban for about 14 acres at 3387 Barron Cut-Off Road. The change will allow a single-family residential development.

Councilwoman Julie Schultz recused herself from the discussion because of a conflict of interest.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

9:24 p.m.

White’s Creek Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted 5-0 to approve a request to change the zoning designation from Rural to Estate for about five acres at 15590 White’s Creek Lane. The change will allow for residential development.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

9:25 p.m.

BVSWMA Appointment

The council voted 5-0 to appoint Rick Floyd to the Brazos Valley Solid Waste Management Agency’s board of directors.

9:30 p.m.

The council discussed and reviewed future agenda items.

9:30 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the meeting. The council meets again for a special meeting on Monday, Oct. 2. The next regular meeting is Thursday, Oct. 12.

Thanks for joining us. Good Night!

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also been a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.



If you found value in this blog post, please share it with your social network and friends!

		
	

5 things to watch at Monday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Monday at city hall for its workshop (6 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:

  1. Affordable Housing Update: In the workshop, the council will be updated on the city’s efforts and programs to promote affordable housing.
  2. Arrington Road Interlocal Agreement: As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider an interlocal agreement with Brazos County to allow the county to pay for improvements to Arrington Road within the city limits.
  3. Hand-Held Ordinance Repeal: Another consent agenda item is the repeal of the city ordinance prohibiting the use of hand-held electronic devices while driving. The ordinance was recently preempted by state law, which bans texting and driving.
  4. FY18 Budget/Tax Rate Adoption: The council will consider adopting the city’s proposed $365.7 million budget for FY18, along with a 2½-cent increase in the property tax rate to 49.75 cents per $100 of valuation.
  5. Rezoning near Carters Creek Plant: The council will consider a request to change the zoning from Rural to Restricted Suburban and Natural Areas Protected for about 46 acres east of the Emerald Forest Subdivision near the Carters Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant. The change would allow a single-family residential development.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Channels 19 and 119 (HD), or online. The website includes an archive of previous council meetings. We’ll post a detailed live blog on this site.

Related Links:                                                                 

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

If you found value in this blog post, please share it with your social network and friends!



	

Live Blog: Monday’s city council meetings (Sept. 11)

Back (L-R): Linda Harvell, Jerome Rektorik, James Benham, Barry Moore. Front (L-R): Blanche Brick, Mayor Karl Mooney, Julie Schultz.

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Monday, Sept. 11. It’s not the official minutes.

The meeting is being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channels 19 and 119 (HD) and online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

6:31 p.m.

The workshop has started. No action was taken out of executive session.

Workshop Meeting Agenda and Background Materials

6:43 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled these consent items for workshop discussion:

  • Westside Community Park: Staff is requesting approval for the $2.5 million purchase of two tracts (48.6 acres and 55.4 acres) and the acceptance of a third tract (7 acres) as a donation to be developed into the Westside Community Park. The property is located on North Dowling Road west of the city. Additional costs will include surveying, environmental reports, title insurance, and closing fees, which are estimated not to exceed $80,000. Funds are budgeted in the Community Park Land Zone B Fund, the Neighborhood Park Land Zone 15 fund, and the Neighborhood Parks Revolving Fund.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

  • Rental Registration Ordinance Amendment: In July, staff provided the council with an overview and update on the rental registration program. The council directed staff to eliminate the requirement to renew the registration of a property on an annual basis and instead require only an initial registration. Staff recommended adding an additional requirement to register four-plex and other types of rental units to assist city staff when responding to an issue, violation, or emergency.

    Staff reviewed the ordinance as adopted and included changes to clarify information for property owners and residents to better understand which properties are subject to the law. The changes include: The title of the ordinance was revised; the types of properties were added to include single-family, townhome, duplex, triplex, fourplex, five-plex & six-plex; a definition of multi-family dwelling was added; a definition of owner occupied was added; clarification that a new registration is required in the event of a change in ownership; change in local contact information must be reported within 30 days; and fee of $15 charged per building.

  • Single-Stream Recycling Agreement: Staff recommends renewal of years 3-5 of a five-year franchise agreement and general services contract with Brazos Valley Recycling for the collection, processing, and marketing of recyclable materials. The city pays an annual cost of $880,000. The provision of recycling collection services and associated public education programs account for $3.18 out of the $14.40 monthly sanitation fee charged to each customer.
  • Transportation Network Ordinance Repeal: The governor recently signed HB100 into law to provide a uniform, statewide approach to regulating and permitting transportation network companies through the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation. The law preempts local control by establishing exclusive power and function solely to the state. As such, the city transportation network company ordinance will be repealed.

7:12 p.m.

Council to repeal city’s hands-free ordinance

The council voted 4-3 to direct staff to bring back an ordinance to repeal the existing city law regarding the use of hand-held communication devices while driving. The state legislature recently took action to ban texting and driving statewide. The city’s ordinance prohibits any use of hand-held communication devices while driving.

The discussion also included a review of a study by the Texas A&M Transportation Institute on the effectiveness of the city ordinance.

Survey of Wireless Communication Device Use

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:27 p.m.

Long-Term Water Supplies

The council heard a presentation about potential long-term water supplies. College Station’s water comes entirely from groundwater wells. As groundwater reserves are drawn down, the city could be required to reduce its pumping amounts.

Consequently, the city is planning for alternative water supplies that would replace any required cutbacks. Possibilities include direct potable reuse, aquifer storage and recovery, desalination, and surface water.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:28 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar and received committee reports. The regular meeting will start after a short break.

7:36 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

Regular Meeting Agenda and Background Materials

7:41 p.m.

Laserfiche Excellence Award

Deputy City Secretary Ian Whittenton was recognized for receiving MCCi’s Laserfiche Excellence Award for its innovative use of Laserfiche. 

7:43 p.m.

Constitution Week

The mayor proclaimed Sept. 17-23 as Constitution Week in commemoration of America’s most important document. The celebration of the Constitution was started by the Daughters of the American Revolution in 1955 when the DAR petitioned Congress to set aside an annual observance. The resolution was adopted by the U.S. Congress and signed into law in 1956 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. 

7:48 p.m.

Thank a Police Officer Day

Mayor Mooney proclaimed Saturday, Sept. 16 as Thank a Police Officer Day in College Station. The event is promoted by the College Station Citizens Police Academy Alumni Association

7:49 p.m.

Hear Visitors

No one signed up to speak during Hear Visitors when citizens might address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda.

7:49 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • An Interlocal agreement with Brazos County and the City of Bryan to apply for and accept a 2017 Justice Assistance Grant from the U.S. Department of Justice.
  • An $11.36 million contract with Larry Young Paving for the Lakeway Drive Project.
  • A $2.88 million contract with Larry Young Paving for the Royder Road Expansion Phase 1 Project.
  • Temporarily changed the posted speed limit to 25 mph on Royder Road between the city limit to 700 feet north of Backwater Drive during the Royder Road Expansion Phase 1 project.
  • A $315,000 contract with Brazos Paving for construction of the culvert and replacement of the water line at the intersection of Dominik and Stallings Drive.
  • Awarded a $545,000 contract to C3 Constructors for the Carter Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant’s 4 and 5 Blower Improvements.
  • A resolution naming the authorized representative on the Public Agency Retirement Services’ Public Agencies Post-Retirement Health Care Plan Trust account.
  • An agreement for administrative services with Public Agency Retirement Services in the amount of 0.25 percent of plan assets for financial advisory services on an annual basis, estimated to be $3,250 in this initial year.
  • A $230,000 contract with Xpedient Mail for printing and mailing utility bills, late notices, and inserts.
  • A three-year Interlocal Agreement with the City of Bryan and Brazos County for the City of College Station to provide Emergency Medical Ambulance Service to Brazos County and to receive payments every quarter.
  • The final reading of the recycling collection franchise ordinance and service agreement renewal with Brazos Valley Recycling not to exceed $880,000 or the number of customers times the approved contract rates.
  • The acquisition of 110.95 acres to be developed into Westside Community Park.
  • A $256,384 contract with Utility Restoration Services for annual padmount equipment repair and restoration.
  • An amendment to the city’s Code of Ordinances regarding the working hours for necessary construction.
  • An amendment to the city’s Building and Building Regulations and Single-Family and Duplex Unit Rental Registration.
  • Repealed the city ordinance regarding Transportation Network Companies after the state legislature passed a bill allowing only the state to regulate transportation network companies.

7:51 p.m.

FY18 Budget Public Hearing

The council conducted a public hearing on the city’s proposed $365.5 million budget for FY18, which is scheduled for adoption Sept. 25.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:58 p.m.

FY18 Tax Rate Public Hearing

The council conducted a public hearing on the city’s proposed tax rate for FY18, which is scheduled for adoption Sept. 25. The proposed rate is 49.75 cents per $100 of assessed value, a 2½-cent increase from the current rate.

One person spoke against the tax increase during the public hearing.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

10:24 p.m.

Fairview Avenue Rezoning at George Bush Drive

After a public hearing, the council voted 4-3 to approve a request to rezone two lots on the south side of Fairview Avenue at the George Bush Drive intersection. Councilwomen Blanche Brick and Linda Harvell joined Mayor Mooney is voted against the motion. The change will allow the relocation of the nearby Aggieland Outfitters store.

Ten people spoke against the zoning change and three for it during the public hearing. One written statement supporting the change also was submitted.

Here are the PowerPoint presentations:

 

10:24 p.m.

The meeting will resume after a short break.

10:34 p.m.

The meeting has resumed.

10:37 p.m.

UDO Amendment: Utility Easements

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to amend the city’s Unified Development Ordinance (UDO) regarding the location of utility easements. The change is part of efforts to streamline the UDO and will give the city engineer flexibility regarding the location and width of utility easements, which will reduce costs for the developer, staff time for processing waiver requests, and the number of waiver requests considered by the Planning & Zoning Commission.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

10:40 p.m.

UDO Amendment: Health Clubs

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to amend the UDO to permit health clubs in Commercial Industrial zoning districts. The change allows gyms and exercise facilities to use buildings with a warehouse or industrial character.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

10:40 p.m.

The council discussed and reviewed future agenda items.

10:40 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the meeting. The council meets again on Monday, Sept. 25.

 


About the Author

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also been a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.



If you found value in this blog post, please share it with your social network and friends!

		
	

5 things to watch at Monday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Monday at city hall for its workshop (6 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:

  1. Hand-Held Ordinance Update: In the workshop, the council will discuss legislative changes that could impact the city’s ordinance regarding the use of hand-held communication devices while driving. The council will also review a study by the Texas A&M Transportation Institute on the effectiveness of the city ordinance.
  2. Lakeway Drive Extension: As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider an $11.36 million contract for the extension of Lakeway Drive from Fitch Parkway to the Scott & White Hospital near Rock Prairie Road.
  3. Royder Road Expansion: Another consent agenda item is a $2.88 million for the first phase of the expansion of Royder Road. The project includes reconstruction of the road from the city limit to near Backwater Lane
  4. and changing the 2-way asphalt road section into a 3-lane concrete roadway.
  5. Fairview Avenue Rezoning: After a public hearing, the council will consider rezoning two lots on the south side of Fairview Avenue at the George Bush Drive intersection. The change would allow the relocation of the nearby Aggieland Outfitters store.
  6. Budget, Tax Rate Public Hearings: The council will conduct public hearings on the proposed FY18 city budget and property tax rate. The proposed tax rate is 49.75 cents per $100 of assessed value, a 2½-cent increase. The $365.5 million budget and tax rate are scheduled for adoption on Sept. 25.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Channels 19 and 119 (HD), or online. The website includes an archive of previous council meetings. We’ll post a detailed live blog on this site.

Related Links:                                                                 

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

If you found value in this blog post, please share it with your social network and friends!


		
	

5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (6 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:

  1. Construction Activity Hours: In the workshop, the council will discuss changes to the permissible hours of construction activities.
  2. Library Expansion: The council will hear workshop update on the final details regarding the expansion of the Larry J. Ringer Library. The project is ready to bid for construction with completion projected for early 2019.
  3. Southeast Community Park: The council will discuss details of the Southeast Community Park Project, including renderings, funding, projected use, and economic impact.
  4. FY18 City Budget: The final workshop item is a presentation on the city’s proposed FY18 budget. The council will review the document in detail during workshops scheduled Monday-Wednesday of next week.
  5. Chimney Hill Property: After a public hearing in the regular meeting, the council will consider a request to amend the concept plan for the 8-acre Chimney Hill property on University Drive. The change will allow for redevelopment of the property.

(more…)


Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Jan. 26)

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Jan. 26. It’s not the official minutes.

The meeting is being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and streamed online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

6:00 p.m.

The workshop has started. 

6:04 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled this consent item for workshop discussion:

  • Cemetery Foot Markers: This ordinance change would standardize foot markers in city cemeteries and would allow one flat foot marker not to exceed 72 inches in length when family or double monuments are placed on at least two adjoining standard spaces.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:45 p.m.

High-Speed Rail Update

The council received an update on the high-speed rail project between Houston and Dallas that will include a stop in the Brazos Valley.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:51 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar, future agenda items, and committee reports. The regular meeting will start at 7 p.m.

7:01 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

7:08 p.m.

Hear Visitors

Two people spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens may address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda.

  • Ben Roper recognized Marine Cpl. Matthew E. Matula as part of the Fallen Heroes Memorial program. The 20-year-old Spicewood native died April 9, 2004, from hostile fire in Iraq.
  • Bob Reinhardt encouraged the city to do all it can to attract additional internet providers to town.

7:09 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • Authorized the city manager or designees to execute grant applications for state Homeland Security Law Enforcement Terrorism Prevention Activities funds from the Office of the Governor.
  • Annual tire purchases and retread services not-to-exceed $230,000 from Southern Tire Mart.
  • An annual blanket purchase order not to exceed $120,000 from Siddons-Martin Emergency Group for repair parts and labor for fire trucks.
  • A $166,100 contract with Jacobs Engineering Group for a needs assessment and program for the Utility Service Center.
  • A $62,593 change order to a contract with Palasota Contracting for a street rehabilitation project along Nimitz Street from Lincoln Avenue to Ash Street.
  • An ordinance amendment adding stop signs at various intersection approaches.
  • An ordinance amendment adding yield signs on Holleman Drive South at FM 2818, Koppe Bridge Road at South Dowling Road, and the Scott and White Drive roundabout.
  • An ordinance amendment adding foot marker exceptions for family or double monuments in city cemeteries.
  • The fourth and final renewal of a general services agreement not to exceed $120,000 with Emergicon to provide ambulance billing, accounts receivable and delinquent account collection services.

7:16 p.m.

Budget Amendment No. 1

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a $6.1 million amendment to the city’s FY17 budget, including $5.9 million that was budgeted an encumbered in FY16 but won’t be received until FY17.

The encumbrance roll includes $2.39 million to establish a Community Development Block Grant local account and $1.3 million for a new ladder truck for the Fire Department. Other items in the budget amendment are $63,500 for park improvements – a budget clean-up item that corrects an error in FY17 appropriations – and $200,000 for a sewer line extension on Lakeway Drive.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:23 p.m.

Planned Development District Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to rezone about 39 acres northeast of the intersection of Jones-Butler Road and FM2818. The change would result in the addition of three acres into the existing Planned Development District, which includes multi-family housing and preserves flood-prone areas.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:36 p.m.

Itinerant Vendor Ordinance Amendment

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to exempt mobile medical clinics and related mobile services from the city’s itinerant vendor requirements and to expand the number of days allowed for outdoor tent sales to 36 per year.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:41 p.m.

Historic Preservation Committee

The council voted unanimously to appoint Louis Hodges as chair of the Historic Preservation Committee.

7:47 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the meeting. The council meets again on Thursday, Feb. 9.


14316755_10108798313965164_2904942172107966680_nAbout the Author

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian)has been with the City of College Station since 2010. He previously served 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also been a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


If you found value in this blog post, please share it with your social network and friends!

5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

5523701_l

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (5:30 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:

  1. Itinerant Vendor Ordinance: In the workshop, the council will discuss an itinerant vendor ordinance and requirements related to temporary outdoor sales, including mobile medical uses.
  2. Bee Creek Sewer Line: As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider a $4.6 million contract with Elliott Construction for the second of four phases of the rehabilitation of the Bee Creek Sanitary Sewer Trunk Line. The project will increase the system’s capacity to accept maximum demand at eventual build-out.
  3. Roadway Maintenance Fees: Also on the consent agenda are roadway maintenance fees dedicated to the repair and upkeep of city streets. The proposed monthly fees would be added to utility bills are $7.78 for single family, $6.10 for multi-family, and commercial fees ranging from $17.23-$250. The fees are expected to generate about $4.5 million per year.
  4. Parking Removal: After a public hearing, the council will consider removing parking on Avenue B and Payton, Banks, Pearce, Columbus, Preston, Churchill, Chappel, Pasler and Turner streets. The change would allow access for emergency vehicles.
  5. Roadway Impact Fees: After a public hearing, the council will consider approving roadway impact fees on new development to help pay the costs of building new roadways. The fees would be phased in starting in December 2017 and would in generate about $12 million in the next decade.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Ch. 19, or online. The website includes an archive of previous council meetings. We’ll post a detailed live blog on this site.

Related links:                                                                 

 


14316755_10108798313965164_2904942172107966680_nAbout the Author

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian)has been with the City of College Station since 2010. He previously served 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

If you found value in this blog post, please share it with your social network and friends!