Posts tagged “COVID-19

Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Feb. 11)

Standing (l-r): John Crompton, Bob Brick, John Nichols, Dennis Maloney. Sitting (l-r): Linda Harvell, Mayor Karl Mooney, Elizabeth Cunha.

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Feb. 11. It’s not the official minutes.

The meetings are streamed live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and at cstx.gov/cstv19. To join the meeting online, go to Zoom or call 888 475 4499 and enter webinar number 957 6653 1244. if the call-in number isn’t working, access will be limited to Zoom.

5:22 p.m.

The workshop has started. The council took no action out of its executive session.

5:24 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council pulled no items from tonight’s consent agenda for discussion.

6:17 p.m.

Local Election Cycle

After discussing the pros and cons of holding local general elections in November of odd-numbered years, the council voted 4-3 against a motion to bring the item back for future action. Councilmen Crompton, Brick and Maloney voted for the motion.

The city is already transitioning council terms from three years to four years, with elections in November of even-numbered years. Providing for general elections in odd-numbered years would have required a special charter amendment election.

Here’s the PowerPoint Presentation:

6:30 p.m.

Water, Wastewater Service in ETJ

The council discussed an ordinance amendment to establish a wastewater rate surcharge for customers outside the city limits. The item will come back to the council in March.

Here’s the PowerPoint Presentation:

6:35 p.m.

After the council discussed its calendar and received committee reports, Mayor Karl Mooney adjourned the workshop. The regular meeting starts after a short break.

6:50 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

6:58 p.m.

Hear Visitors

One person spoke during Hear Visitors, when citizens may address the council on any item that does not appear on the posted agenda.

  • Judy LeUnes encouraged the city to pass a humane pet store ordinance
  • Fred Dupriest spoke against the validity of the poll regarding the proposed restricted occupancy ordinance.

7:00 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • A $2.37 million contract with PowerGrid Services for the construction of the Spring Creek Substation Ring Bus Modification. The owner also is furnishing $1.29 million in material for a total bonded project requirement of $3.66 million.
  • A resolution granting consent to Rock Prairie Management District No. 2 for the sale and issuance of unlimited tax road bonds, series 2021, not to exceed $2.5 million.
  • The first renewal of a contract not to exceed $250,000 with D.I.J. Construction for pavement striping and markings services.
  • An inter-local agreement with Brazos County and the City of Bryan to establish and support a COVID-19 vaccination HUB and to memorialize the commitment in equally sharing in the cost of supplies for the HUB with a maximum of $100,000.

7:02 p.m.

Disaster Declaration Extension

The council voted unanimously to extend the mayor’s COVID-19 disaster declaration.

7:11 p.m.

Hike & Bike Trail Parking Lot

The council voted unanimously to approve a $329,000 contract with Aggieland Construction for the Lick Creek Hike & Bike Trailhead and parking lot project. The work also includes an access road to Midtown Drive that will also serve as a driveway for the CSU substation located west of the proposed parking lot.

Here’s the PowerPoint Presentation:

7:37 p.m.

LULAC Oak Hill Rehabilitation

The council voted unanimously to approve a request for support from LULAC Oak Hill Apartments — a 49-unit apartment complex at 1105 Anderson St. — for the complete rehabilitation of the property, proposed costs, and potential funding source. The complex is a supportive housing complex for income-qualified elderly residents.

Here’s the PowerPoint Presentation:

9:49 p.m.

After the council discussed future agenda items, Mayor Mooney adjourned the meeting. The council’s next workshop and regular meetings are set for Thursday, Feb. 25.

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as the associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council meets at city hall on Thursday for its workshop (after 5 p.m.) and regular (6 p.m.) meetings. Public attendance is restricted.

The meetings are streamed live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and at cstx.gov/cstv19. To join the meeting online, go to Zoom or call 888 475 4499 and enter webinar number 957 6653 1244. if the call-in number isn’t working, access will be limited to Zoom.

To address the council via Zoom about any agenda item — or about non-agenda topics during Hear Visitors — you must register with the city secretary before the meeting by calling 979-764-3500 or emailing CSO@cstx.gov before the meeting starts. Written comments submitted to CSO@cstx.gov will be provided to the council members.

Here are five items to watch:

  1. Local Elections: In the workshop, the council will discuss the pros and cons of holding local general elections in November of odd-numbered years. The city is already transitioning council terms from three years to four years, with elections in November of even-numbered years. Providing for general elections in odd-numbered years would require a special charter amendment election.
  2. Rock Prairie Management District Bonds: As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider consenting to Rock Prairie Management District No. 2’s sale and issuance of unlimited tax road bonds (series 2021) not to exceed $2.5 million. The bonds’ repayment will be by residents and businesses in the district, which includes about 270 acres on the east side of State Highway 6 between Rock Prairie Road and Fitch Parkway.
  3. Vaccination HUB: Another consent agenda item is an inter-local agreement with Brazos County and the City of Bryan to establish and support a COVID-19 vaccination HUB and sharing the costs. The city’s maximum contribution is $100,000.
  4. Hike & Bike Trail Parking Lot: In the regular meeting, the council will consider a $329,000 contract with Aggieland Construction for the Lick Creek Hike & Bike Trailhead and parking lot project. The work also includes an access road to Midtown Drive that will also serve as a driveway for the CSU substation located west of the proposed parking lot.
  5. LULAC Oak Hill Rehabilitation: The council will consider a request for support from LULAC Oak Hill Apartments — a 49-unit apartment complex at 1105 Anderson St. — for the complete rehabilitation of the property, proposed costs, and potential funding source. The complex is a supportive housing complex for income-qualified elderly residents. 

Related Links:                 

 


About the Blogger Colin Killian has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as the associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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Do you have to pay rent during the pandemic?

By David Brower, Community Development Analyst

The economic realities of the COVID-19 pandemic mean that many families are struggling to make ends meet after losing income. Essential responsibilities such as paying rent have become exceedingly difficult. 

In September, the Centers for Disease Control issued a temporary eviction moratorium, allowing some property owners to pause evictions for nonpayment of rent in certain circumstances. The moratorium remains in effect through March 31. 

If you are unable to pay rent, you might wonder what this means for you. Do you have to pay your rent? The short answer is yes. 

An eviction paused under the moratorium doesn’t erase current or past due rent. You may still be charged late fees, penalties, and other fees for unpaid rent. 

The eviction moratorium pauses evictions for rent nonpayment if the following seven conditions are met for each adult on a lease, and a signed declaration is submitted to your landlord:   

  1. You’re unable to pay your total rent because of a decrease in household income or extraordinary medical expenses.
  2. You’re making your best effort to make timely partial payments that are as close to the total amount due as circumstances allow.
  3. You’ve made your best effort to get all available government assistance.
  4. You meet one of these conditions:
  • You made less than $99,000 in 2020 (or $198,000 if filing a joint tax return).
  • You weren’t required to report any income to the IRS.
  • You received a CARES Act stimulus check.
  1. If evicted, you’d likely become homeless, move into a homeless shelter, or move into new housing shared by other people in close quarters.
  2. You understand that you’re responsible for paying unpaid rent, you may be charged fees for due rent, and you must continue to comply with your lease terms.
  3. You understand that when the CDC order expires on March 31, you may be subject to eviction if you have unpaid rent or fees.

For more information, visit the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s Help For Renters webpage.

To get referrals to area resources and rent assistance, dial 2-1-1 for free help. Trained specialists are available around the clock, with services available in more than 90 languages.

 


About the Blogger

David Brower has been a community development analyst for the City of College Station since he graduated from Texas A&M in 2008.


 

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Egg Scramble brings the egg hunt to you

By Ana Romero, Recreation Manager

With spring on the horizon and Easter approaching, the Parks & Recreation Department has devised a way to help the Easter Bunny during the COVID-19 pandemic — a socially distant, candy-filled egg hunt.

The success of Eggtober last fall showed us how — a socially distant, candy-filled egg hunt.

From March 22-27, we’ll bring the hunt to you with Egg Scramble. We offer two personal egg hunts for all ages, and you may purchase as many 25-egg bundles as you like for $15 each. The eggs are filled with allergy-friendly candy. 

Front Yard Egg Hunt (College Station residents only)

Our staff hides eggs in your front yard to your preferred difficulty level. You select the day and time that works best, and your yard will be ready. Delivery times are available Monday-Thursday from 4-6 p.m. and Friday-Saturday from 8:30 a.m.-6 p.m. 

Hunt level options include easy, medium, or difficult.
 
DIY Hunt

You can opt for the do-it-yourself option if you don’t have a College Station address, you’d like to gift it to someone, or if you want to personalize it. We’ll provide the treat-filled eggs and a door hanger, which you can pick up at the Stephen C. Beachy Central Park Office at 1000 Krenek Tap Road. 

Pick-ups are available March 22-26 from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Call 979-764-3486 when you arrive, and we’ll bring it to the curb.

Register now through March 12 at rectrac.cstx.gov or call 979-764-3468. You can also register at our Beachy Central Park office. For more information, visit cstx.gov/eggscramble.

 


About the Blogger

Ana Romero is in her fourth year as recreation manager. She previously served the City of McAllen as recreation supervisor, community center manager, and aquatics superintendent. Ana earned a bachelor’s degree in Recreation, Park and Tourism Sciences from Texas A&M in 2001.


 

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City provides federal funds for rent assistance

UPDATE (2/4): The response to the rent assistance program has exceeded the available funds. Applications are no longer being accepted.

By David Brower, Community Development Analyst

The City of College Station has limited federal funds available for another round of rental assistance for residents who have been economically impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Many families in our community have suffered financial hardships because of the pandemic — jobs have been lost, hours have been reduced, and folks have struggled to make ends meet. The program can provide up to six months of rent assistance, including past due rent.

The Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs has channeled the funds through the Texas Emergency Rental Assistance Program and Texas Eviction Diversion Program. The limited assistance is available on a first-come, first-served basis for eligible College Station households that submit applications. 

For more information — including eligibility requirements and application documents — visit cstx.gov/RentAssist

 


About the Blogger

David Brower has been a community development analyst for the City of College Station since he graduated from Texas A&M in 2008.



Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Jan. 28)

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Jan. 28. It’s not the official minutes.

The meetings are streamed live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and at cstx.gov/cstv19. To join the meeting online, go to Zoom or call 888 475 4499 and enter webinar number 962 3956 1490. if the call-in number isn’t working, access will be limited to Zoom.

5:27 p.m.

The workshop has started. The council took no action out of its executive session.

5:41 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council pulled this item from tonight’s consent agenda for discussion:

  • Victoria Avenue Rehabilitation: The $458,400 contract with Jones and Carter is for designing the reconstruction of Victoria Avenue from Wellborn Road to Woodlake Drive.

6:06 p.m.

Greenway Trail Surfaces

The council discussed surface options for future greenway trails.

Here’s the PowerPoint Presentation:

6:07 p.m.

The workshop has been suspended. The workshop will resume after the a special presentation.

6:07 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

6:14 p.m.

Bobby Maggard Proclamation

The mayor presented a proclamation honoring Bobby Maggard for his dedicated volunteer service as part of the Citizens Fire Academy Alumni Association’s REHAB Team.

6:15 p.m.

The regular meeting has been suspended and the workshop will resume.

7:32 p.m.

Residential Over-Occupancy

The council discussed options for addressing the symptoms of over-occupancy in residential neighborhoods. The council directed staff to bring the item back to the council for action in the spring.

Here’s the PowerPoint Presentation:

7:34 p.m.

After the council discussed its calendar and received committee reports, Mayor Karl Mooney adjourned the workshop. The regular meeting starts after a short break.

7:45 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

7:46 p.m.

Hear Visitors

No one spoke during Hear Visitors, when citizens may address the council on any item that does not appear on the posted agenda.

7:47 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • A $56,892.96 change order to the Network Hardware and Installation project service agreement with Avinext.
  • A $458,400 contract with Jones and Carter for the design of the Victoria Avenue rehabilitation project.

8:27 p.m.

Retail Recruitment

The council discussed how the city’s retail strategy has pivoted during the COVID-19 pandemic. The city continues to recruit news retail opportunities while sustaining existing businesses and backfilling vacant spaces.

Here’s the PowerPoint Presentation:

8:45 p.m.

Alex Caruso Court

The council voted 5-1-1 to approve a resolution to name Castlegate Park’s basketball court “Alex Caruso Court.” Councilwoman Elizabeth Cunha voted against the motion, and Councilman John Crompton abstained.

A College Station native, Caruso recently won an NBA championship with the Los Angeles Lakers. As a youngster, he spent countless hours playing and practicing on the Castlegate court across the street from his parents’ home.

9:16 p.m.

COVID-19 Vaccinations

The council was updated on local COVID-19 vaccine distribution.

Here’s the PowerPoint Presentation:

9:16 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the meeting. The council’s next workshop and regular meetings are set for Thursday, Feb. 11.

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as the associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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