Posts tagged “economic impact

Youth football showcase fills local hotels this weekend

By Gene Ballew, Athletics & Tourism Manager

Now that the Super Bowl buzz is wearing off, College Station welcomes 120 youth football teams to Veterans Park and Athletic Complex this weekend for the Texas Youth Football All Star Showcase

The tournament includes 3,500 football and 250 cheer athletes from Texas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Arizona. The influx of about 8,000 visitors for the event has filled local hotels to capacity. 

Participants are selected from 21 regions, and the winners of each age division (7U/8U/9U/10U/11U/12U/13U) are invited to the National Youth Football All Star Showcase this summer in San Antonio. 

Here’s the schedule:

  • Friday: Check-In & Opening Ceremonies: 3-8 p.m.
  • Saturday: Games: 8 a.m.-7:15 p.m.; Cheer Competition: 2:15-3:15 p.m.
  • Sunday: Games: 8 a.m.-7:15 p.m.; Cheer Competition: 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m.
  • Monday: Championship Games: 1-3 p.m.

Heavy traffic and delays are expected in and around the complex. Organizers have imposed a $40 gate fee for entrance, and mask-wearing is mandatory for all athletes, coaches, and spectators unless they are on the field playing.

Local Impact

The economic impact is similar to the 2019 Games of Texas, but the showcase is being played at a single facility.

The Parks & Recreation Department has had exhaustive meetings with health officials and tournament organizers to ensure established safety guidelines and protocols are met or exceeded. The city is responsible for cleaning and maintaining our facilities, while tournament organizers will provide city-approved safety guidelines and protocols for participants and spectators.

We’ll continue to adapt to the evolving situation by adjusting operations. Our overriding mission is to safely attract customers to town while helping our residents and businesses recover from the pandemic.

If you encounter these visitors in our city, please thank them for being here and wish them an enjoyable stay!

 


About the Blogger

Gene Ballew has been with the Parks and Recreation Department for 14 years and is in his fourth year as the athletics and tourism manager. He earned a bachelor’s degree in Sport and Fitness Administration/Management from Texas A&M in 2008.


 

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Choose to Shop College Station this holiday season

By Aubrey Nettles, Economic Development Manager

An annual rite of the holiday season is the hustle and bustle of busy shoppers searching stores for the perfect gift. The shops are festively decorated, and smiles abound as the joy of the season overwhelms our senses. 

Holiday shopping may look different this year, but those ideal gifts remain in abundance. In fact, with many businesses hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic, shopping in College Station is more vital than ever. 

You have friends, family members, and neighbors who own or operate — or are employed by — these businesses. Our entire community needs them to stay afloat.

Local shopping also generates sales taxes, a portion of which goes directly back to your community to fund essential government services such as the police, fire, and parks departments. More than 30% of the City of College Station’s annual revenue comes from sales tax revenue. When local sales are strong, we rely less on other revenue sources, which benefits us all.

Holiday shopping has traditionally been the most critical time of year for countless businesses since it generates their annual sales peak. This year, many are just trying to survive until the pandemic passes, and normal life resumes.

You can help by choosing to shop in College Station.

Local businesses have implemented extensive precautions to ensure the safety of their customers and employees. Some retailers have started Black Friday-type savings events early to avoid a rush of shoppers the day after Thanksgiving. Others allow you to order online and pick-up at the store, with many offering a curbside option.

Some even have contactless home delivery options for College Station and Bryan residents. 

Local stores have installed ample safety measures such as plexiglass dividers at check out and multiple sanitizing stations. All are enforcing six-foot physical spacing and mandatory face coverings. 

 While the obligatory face coverings may conceal the broad smiles we typically share at Christmastime, they can’t hide the sparkle in shoppers’ eyes and the cheerful nature of the season.

 


About the Blogger

Aubrey Nettles is in her second year as the city’s Economic Development Manager. She also served four years as the special projects coordinator in the City Manager’s Office. Before coming to College Station, she was the executive assistant to the Fort Bend County Commission and was a management analyst for Harris County. A native of Smithville, Aubrey earned a master’s degree in public administration from the University of Houston in 2012 and a bachelor’s degree in communications from Texas A&M in 2010.  


 

 


Rescheduled summer sports events can help us recover

By Gene Ballew, Athletics & Tourism Manager

What does a sports event or tournament look like in the era of COVID-19? As participants, coaches, and spectators, we’ll soon find out.

Through his executive orders, Gov. Greg Abbott has paved the way for adult and youth sports competitions to begin. The City of College Station will host its first tournament June 19-21 with more than 100 girls’ softball teams from around the state.

The challenges of recent months have led us to this point. Typically, our tournament season ramps up in April and runs through the end of July. Since the pandemic began, our goal has been to bring tourism back to College Station while maintaining the safety of our citizens, guests, and staff.

Our department has had exhaustive meetings with local health officials and tournament organizers to ensure safety guidelines and protocols laid out by the governor and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are met or exceeded. The city is responsible for cleaning and maintaining our facilities, while tournament organizers will provide city-approved safety guidelines and protocols for participants and spectators.

In March, we halted eight tournaments slated to bring about 400 teams to town. Our team worked diligently to reschedule several of the events, allowing us to keep about 300 teams. Along with three new tournaments — attracting about 150 teams — we maintained millions of dollars of economic impact in our community.

Here’s a look at our summer schedule:

  • June 19-21 — Texas State Championships and Southwest Regional Showcase
  • June 27-28 — Tournament of Champions 7v7 Football
  • June 27-28 — USSSA Budweiser Invitational
  • June 30-July 3 — Battle for Texas 7v7 Football
  • July 7-12 — SSUSA Senior Softball
  • July 11-12 —The Summer Games 2020
  • July 17-19 — Texas State Championships and Southwest Regional Showcase
  • Aug. 1-2 — The Summer Games 2020
  • Aug. 29-30 — Aggieland Friendship Cup

We’ll continue to adapt to the evolving situation by adjusting our operations. Our overriding mission is to safely bring customers to town while helping our residents and businesses recover.

 


About the Blogger

Gene Ballew has been with the Parks and Recreation Department for 13 years and is in his third year as the athletics and tourism manager. He earned a bachelor’s degree in Sport and Fitness Administration/Management from Texas A&M in 2008.


 

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Games of Texas benefit BCS by a cool $8.1 million

By Kelli Nesbitt, Parks & Recreation Marketing Coordinator

The final numbers are in for the Texas Amateur Athletic Federation’s Summer Games of Texas. The Olympic-like festival attracted 8,461 athletes from across the state to compete in a dozen events from July 25-29.

Only 130 participants were from College Station, which means the rest – along with about 20,000 of their coaches, family members, and friends – were visitors who dropped an estimated $8.1 million into the local economy by filling local restaurants and hotels.

Participants by Sport

Event Participants Venue
Archery 49 Texas A&M Physical Education Building
Boxing 114 Hilton College Station & Conference Center
Flag Football 276 Veterans Park & Athletic Complex
Judo 57 Texas A&M Physical Education Building
Golf 65 The City Course at Phillips Event Center
Lifeguard Competition 60 Adamson Lagoon
Pickleball 92 Lincoln Recreation Center
Skateboarding 21 Williamson Skate Park
Swimming 2,638 Texas A&M Student Recreation Center
Track & Field 4,459 College Station High School
Ultimate Frisbee 440 Bryan Regional Athletic Complex
Tennis 190 Bryan High School, Texas A&M Mitchell TennisCenter, Texas A&M Omar Instructional Tennis Center, Phillips Event Center
Total Participants 8,461

Here are some interesting tidbits reported by the Bryan and College Station Parks and Recreation Departments, which partnered with Texas A&M to manage the event:

  • Athletes set 53 Games of Texas records — 42 in swimming and 11 in track and field.
  • Participants and volunteers consumed 38,304 bottles of water and used 27,160 pounds of ice.
  • Local sponsors donated 1,185 meals for participants and volunteers.
  • 162 volunteers assisted, including 44 from the Texas Army National Guard.
  • 331 tennis matches were played over three days.
  • 37 boxing bouts were conducted, four involving girls.
  • The lowest golf 18-hole single round score was a 74 by 17-year-old Ethan Galvan from McAllen. Ethan also had the lowest 36-hole tournament score of 74-82=156.

College Station played host for the seventh time after hosting previous events in 1988, 1994, 2000, 2014, 2015, and 2018. The Games of Texas will move to Corpus Christi for the next two years and to Brownsville in 2022-23.

Local GOT Participation by Year 

2019: 8,461

2018: 7,621

2015: 7,750

2014: 8,438

On behalf of the Cities of College Station and Bryan, we extend a special thank you to our volunteers, TAAF liaisons, commissioners and Texas Army National Guard Warriors. The overwhelming success of the event is a direct reflection of your dedication. We sincerely appreciate your gift of time, energy, and enthusiastic support.

 


About the Blogger

Kelli Nesbitt (@kneztalk) has served the Parks & Recreation Department for 15 years, the last eight as marketing coordinator. A native of Bryan, Kelli earned a bachelor’s degree in health & kinesiology from Sam Houston State.


 

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Games of Texas drops $7.7 million into community

By Kelli Nesbitt, Parks & Recreation Marketing Coordinator

Whenever you play host to a large-scale event that attracts thousands of visitors, you expect it to have a substantial impact on the local economy.

From July 26-30, 7,621 athletes from across the state competed in 11 sports in the Texas Amateur Athletic Federation’s Summer Games of Texas. The Olympic-like festival had only 225 local participants, which means the rest – along with about 19,000 of their coaches, family members, and friends – were visitors staying in our hotels, eating in our restaurants, and shopping in our stores.

The estimated economic impact of all that activity? A cool $7.7 million.

Despite hot weather conditions, the games’ spirit and atmosphere thrived, thanks to hundreds of volunteers and the wholehearted support of our community. We heard scores of positive comments, with many participants saying this was the best Games of Texas to date.

Photos: 2018 TAAF Games of Texas

Here’s the breakdown of participants by sport:

Sport Participants Venue
Archery 52 Texas A&M Physical Education Building
Judo 81 Texas A&M Physical Education Building
Golf 58 The City Course at Phillips Event Center
Lifeguard Competition 60 Bryan Aquatic Center
Pickleball 77 Lincoln Recreation Center
Sand Volleyball 40 Texas A&M Student Recreation Center
Skateboarding 19 Williamson Skate Park
Soccer 304 Veterans Park & Athletic Complex
Swimming 2,472 Texas A&M Student Recreation Center
Tennis 152 Texas A&M Mitchell Tennis Center
Track & Field 4,306 College Station High School
Total Participation 7,621

Here are some interesting tidbits reported by the Bryan and College Station Parks and Recreation Departments, which partnered with Texas A&M to manage the event:

  • Athletes set 72 Games of Texas records.
  • Participants and volunteers consumed 22,000 bottles of water and used 32,120 pounds of ice.
  • Local sponsors donated 1,165 meals for participants and volunteers.
  • 328 volunteers assisted, including 93 from the Texas Army National Guard.
  • 390 gold medals were awarded in track & field and swimming.
  • 271 tennis matches were played over two days.

If you missed out on the fun, don’t fret. The Games of Texas will return to Bryan-College Station July 25-29, 2019.

On behalf of the Cities of Bryan and College Station, we extend a special thank you to our volunteers, TAAF liaisons, commissioners and Texas Army National Guard Warriors. The overwhelming success of the event is a direct reflection of your dedication. We sincerely appreciate your gift of time, energy, and enthusiastic support.

 


About the Blogger

Kelli Nesbitt (@kneztalk) has served the Parks & Recreation Department for 14 years, the last seven as marketing coordinator. A native of Bryan, Kelli earned a bachelor’s degree in health & kinesiology from Sam Houston State.


 

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