Posts tagged “history

Celebrating 80 years as the best place in Texas

By Lacey Lively, Marketing Manager

Friday marks the 80th anniversary of College Station’s incorporation as a city. What started as a tiny community of about 2,000 residents has grown into one of the country’s most desirable and fastest-growing cities.

College Station’s estimated population now exceeds 119,000, but it has found a way to maintain its small-town feel and charm. We’re widely recognized as one of the nation’s top places for business, jobs, families, and retirees.

Everyone is invited to celebrate our community’s birthday on Sunday from 2-4 p.m. at Richard Carter Park, located at 1800 Brazoswood Drive. The event will take place, rain or shine. Local organizations will have booths, activities, and tours for all ages that will focus on historic preservation, community service, and education.

Organizations joining the City of College Station include the College Station Historic Preservation Committee, A&M Garden Club, Daughters of the American Revolution: La Villita Chapter, Monarch Gateway, Texas Master Naturalist: Brazos Valley Chapter, Brazos Heritage Society, Texas Research Ramblers Genealogical Society, Wreaths Across America, and the Children’s Museum of the Brazos Valley.

Richard Carter Park is the homestead site of College Station’s earliest settler and was designated as an official state historical site in 1984. Carter’s original land grant from the Mexican government consisted of 4,428 acres and covered most of what College Station is today.

The park features an interpretive center with displays and a reconstruction of the original water well. A bronze sculpture by Albert Pedulla was installed in 1986 and symbolizes the staking of the claim by Carter, which resulted in the settlement of College Station and the Brazos Valley.

In 1991, the graves of Carter, his wife, and family members were relocated to the park from a nearby site.

Learn more about the anniversary celebration and College Station’s history at cstx.gov/heritage.

 


About the Blogger

Marketing Manager Lacey Lively has been with the City of College Station’s Public Communications Office since 2011. She previously worked as an internet marketing consultant for the Bryan-College Station Eagle and as a web designer. A native of Beaumont, Lacey earned a bachelor’s degree in agricultural journalism and communications from Texas A&M in 2009.


 

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Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Jan. 25)

(L-R): Bob Brick, Linda Harvell, Jerome Rektorik, Karl Mooney (mayor), John Nichols, Barry Moore, James Benham.

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Jan. 25. It’s not the official minutes.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink channel 19 or online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:03 p.m.

The workshop has started. No action was taken out of executive session.

5:21 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled these consent items for workshop discussion:

  • Annexation Plan: The proposed ordinance directs staff to prepare a service plan for the area west of College Station identified for annexation. The service plan will contain the details related to the provision of specific municipal services to the property upon annexation and must be complete and available for public inspection before the public hearings. The ordinance also establishes the two required public hearings: March 19 at 6 p.m. and March 22 at 6 p.m., both at city hall. A fiscal impact analysis will be performed as part of the annexation process. 
  • Water Oversize Participation: The city is requesting construction of an 18-inch water transmission line associated with the development of the Brazos Valley Auto Complex. The developer’s engineer demonstrated that a 12-inch water line was adequate for the proposed development. The agreement covers the difference in cost between the 12-inch water line and the 18-inch water line along State Highway 6 South. A total of $149,805.60 is recommended for this project from the Water Capital Improvement Projects Fund.
  • Pershing Point Parking Removal: The proposed ordinance removes on-street parking on the north side of Hayes Lane from the intersection with Towers Parkway west to Papa Bear Drive, on both sides of Regiment Way, and on the north and west sides of Papa Bear Drive from the intersection with Towers Parkway and extending west and south to 120 feet southwest of the intersection with Hayes Lane. The developer of the Pershing Pointe Villas subdivision chose to construct a standard-width residential street and remove some on-street parking to comply with the Unified Development Ordinance. No parking signs were installed when the roads were built. 
  • Summit Crossing Parking Removal: The proposed ordinance removes on-street parking on the north side of Alamosa Street between Summit Crossing Lane and Dakota Lane, on the south side of Buena Vista between Summit Crossing Lane and Dakota Lane, on the east side of Dakota Lane between Alamosa Street and Buena Vista, and on both sides of the public alley between Alamosa Street and Buena Vista. The developer of the Summit Crossing subdivision chose to construct a standard-width residential street and remove some on-street parking to comply with the Unified Development Ordinance.No parking signs were installed when the roads were built. 
  • Holleman South Widening: The $9.44 million project will reconstruct Holleman from North Dowling to Rock Prairie Road West. Improvements include replacing the two-lane asphalt pavement with a four-lane concrete section, a median/center turn lane, curbs, gutters an underground storm sewer, a sidewalk on the west side, and a multi-use path on the east side. The project also includes the installation of a traffic signal at Rock Prairie West and the new elementary school entrance, as well as illumination along the corridor.

5:38 p.m.

Historic Preservation Committee

The council reviewed the Historic Preservation Committee’s annual report.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

5:42 p.m.

Procurement Card Program Audit

The council received the results of an audit of the city’s procurement card program, which found the city is mitigating risk, encouraging the efficient and effective use of procurement cards, and achieving the program’s objectives. The report said some controls could be strengthened to further reduce risk. For the full document, go to pages 7-23 in tonight’s workshop packet.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:47 p.m.

Neighborhood Conservation Overlay Districts

The council discussed providing additional flexibility in single-family Neighborhood Conservation Overlay districts.

Overlay districts are designed to provide additional standards for new construction and redevelopment in established neighborhoods to promote development that is compatible with the neighborhood’s existing character. A primary goal is to balance the need for the renewal of vacant or underused properties.

Planning and Development Services Staff is working with the Southside neighborhood on an application to form an NCO District for the College Park, Oakwood, and Dulaney neighborhoods. The neighborhoods feel the Unified Development Ordinance language governing NCO options are overly restrictive and rigid and asked for additional flexibility to allow more customization to better target neighborhood issues without overregulating other areas.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:56 p.m.

Arts Council Building Renovation

The council discussed the renovation of the Arts Council building on Colgate Drive and its use as a community center that emphasizes senior programming. The $973,000 project includes reconfiguring the layout to better accommodate community activities, addressing ADA issues, and replacing the HVAC.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:56 p.m.

Mayor Mooney suspended the workshop until after the regular meeting, which will begin after a short break.

7:07 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

7:13 p.m.

Historical Marker Presentations

Two historic markers were presented by College Station’s Historic Preservation Committee.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

Plaque No. 92 will be placed on the home at 700 Thomas, which is owned by Jim and Stephanie Russ. This home, built in 1953, is the former residence of Dr. O.D. Butler and his family. The late Dr. Butler was a legendary figure in the history of Texas A&M through his leadership in agriculture. The Russes are pictured with Mayor Mooney and HPC Chairman Lou Hodges.

Plaque No. 93 will be placed on the home at 601 Montclair, which is owned by Jeff and Brenda Hood. This home — likely built by members of Texas A&M’s Corps of Cadets in 1910 or 1911 — is among the original faculty homes to have been moved from campus into a nearby neighborhood. Pictured below with Mayor Mooney and Chairman  Hodges is resident Paul Dutton.

7:16 p.m.

Hear Visitors

One person spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens might address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda.

  • Councilman James Benham recognized Army Sgt. Glenn D. Hicks, Jr. as part of the Fallen Heroes Memorial program. The 24-year-old College Station native died April 28, 2007, when he was struck with an improvised explosive device and small arms fire during combat operations in Salman Park, Iraq.

7:17 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • A $560,900 contract to JaCody Construction to purchase and replace screw lift pumps at the Carters Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant.
  • A change order decreasing by $52,182 a contract with McDonald Municipal & Industrial. The new contract total is $1,074,287.
  • The second reading of a franchise agreement with Brazos Valley Recycling for the collection of recyclables from commercial businesses and multi-family locations.
  • Annual tire purchases and retread services not to exceed $230,000 from Southern Tire Mart through the BuyBoard Purchasing Cooperative.
  • An annual blanket purchase order not to exceed $120,000 with Siddons-Martin Emergency Group for repair parts and labor for fire trucks through the BuyBoard Purchasing Cooperative.
  • An ordinance directing staff to prepare a service plan and establish public hearing dates and times for the annexation of about 65 acres on the city’s west side.
  • A $149,805.60 oversize participation agreement with Bkck Ltd. for a new water main along State Highway 6 South near its intersection with Sebesta Road.
  • Removed parking on the north side of Hayes Lane from the intersection with Towers Parkway west to Papa Bear Drive, on both sides of Regiment Way, and on the north and west sides of Papa Bear Drive from the intersection with Towers Parkway extending west and south to 120 feet southwest of the intersection with Hayes Lane.
  • Removed parking on the north side of Alamosa Street between Summit Crossing Lane and Dakota Lane, on the south side of Buena Vista between Summit Crossing Lane and Dakota Lane, on the east side of Dakota Lane between Alamosa Street and Buena Vista, and on both sides of the public alley between Alamosa Street and Buena Vista.
  • A $9.44 million contract with Larry Young Paving for the construction of the Holleman Drive South Widening Project.
  • A resolution for the Strong and Sustainable Grant Program that repeals a previous resolution and delegates authority to the city manager to administer and implement the program policy.

7:45 p.m.

Rezoning in 200 Block of Holleman

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the zoning district boundaries to Planned Development District for about 5.6 acres in the 200 block of Holleman Drive in the Pooh’s Park Subdivision. The change will allow the development of 62 detached townhouses designed for students.

Here are the PowerPoint presentations:

8:44 p.m.

Land Use at Rock Prairie and Fitch

After a public hearing, the council voted 5-2 to deny a request to change the land use designation to General Commercial and Natural Areas Reserved for about 35 acres north of the intersection of Rock Prairie Road and William D. Fitch Parkway. Councilmen Jerome Rektoik and Barry Moore voted against the motion.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

9:56 p.m.

Rezoning on Greens Prairie Road West

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the zoning district boundaries to Planned Development District for about eight acres at 3596 Greens Prairie Road West. The change will allow the development of senior assisted-living housing that looks similar to nearby homes.

Here are the PowerPoint presentations:

9:57 p.m.

Parks & Recreation Board Appointment

The council voted unanimously to reappoint Ann Hays to another term on the Parks & Recreation Board.

9:59 p.m.

The council discussed and reviewed future agenda items.

9:59 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the regular meeting and will resume the workshop.

10:00 p.m.

The council discussed its calendar and received committee reports.

10:00 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the workshop. The council meets again on Thursday, Feb. 8.

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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Lincoln Center, neighborhood thrive after years of investment

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By Steve Beachy, Former Parks & Recreation Director (1978-2007)

In 1978, the Lincoln Center and the surrounding neighborhood were in a severe state of neglect.

The old school buildings showed the years of little or no maintenance. Holleman Drive was a narrow roadway with broken pavement and no curbs or gutters. Eleanor Street and adjacent streets were unpaved and had a tendency to become impassable during heavy rains. Sidewalks, street lights, and paved parking were nonexistent.

The area also had numerous substandard homes, vacant houses and properties overgrown with weeds and brush. The poorly maintained softball field and two youth baseball fields fell far short of meeting the needs of our small but growing college-oriented community.

A lack of funding for potential improvements made the situation grim.

A steady renaissance (more…)


Proud history moves Lincoln Center “forever forward”

1945 A&M Consolidated Tigers

By Kelli Nesbitt, Parks & Recreation Marketing Coordinator

People of all ages filter through the Lincoln Recreation Center for various activities and programs, but many don’t realize the building’s historical significance. With February being African American History Month, it’s a perfect time to take a look back at the proud history of Lincoln High School.

More than 2,000 people arrived in Brazos County as slaves. Formal education didn’t exist until the Public Schools Act of 1871. By 1923, 127 African-American students were enrolled in the A&M Consolidated School District. The district accommodated only elementary school students until it began busing pupils to Kemp High School in Bryan.

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The Dream Works Conference (and dreams of my own)

Dream Works Conference

By Cheletia Johnson, Assistant Lincoln Recreation Center Supervisor

Growing up in Southgate Village Apartments and on Edward Street in College Station, it was always my dream to become a doctor to save people from diseases like diabetes and heart disease. Through life’s trials, tribulations and other diversions, my dream was detoured in another direction.

My life changed in 1993 when the late Lillian Jean Clark Robinson, former supervisor of Lincoln Recreation Center, gave me — then an inexperienced young woman who did not like kids — an opportunity to work as a recreation assistant. She believed in me and instilled in me a “work hard” ethic to accomplish my life’s goals and dreams.

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Digging into College Station’s past at Carter Park

IMG_4278

By Ben Gracia, Heritage Programs Intern

College Station has an abundance of beautiful parks with playgrounds, athletic fields, and other amenities. Some also have interesting historical aspects, but one has particular significance for local history buffs.

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Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Dec. 18)

gavel[1]This is a live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Dec. 18. It’s not the official minutes.

Both meetings are being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and can also be watched online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

6:11 p.m.

The workshop has started.

6:13 p.m. (more…)


Five things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

gavel[1]By Colin Killian, Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its final workshop (5:30 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings of 2014. Here are five items to watch:  

  1. Project HOLD: The council will receive a workshop presentation about Project HOLD, the city’s online history database.
  2. Capital Projects: The council will hear a workshop update on the city’s capital project needs.
  3. Rock Prairie Road Rehabilitation: The council will consider a $1.4 million contract for the Rock Prairie Road Rehabilitation Project, which would include base repair, pavement rehabilitation and replacement of drainage culverts between Stone Brook Drive and Fitch Parkway.
  4. Parking Removal on Regal Row, Castlebrook: After a public hearing, the council will consider removing stopping, standing and parking along Regal Row and Castlebrook Drive to address safety concerns.
  5. Bond Committee Appointments: The council will appoint 23 members to the 2015 Bond Citizen Advisory Committee to help identify and prioritize potential capital improvement projects to be considered by voters in the November 2015 bond election.

(more…)


CS’s oral history project preserves veterans’ stories

veterans2

You probably know the City of College Station has a lot of its history preserved in the form of documents, maps and photos. But it may surprise you that we’ve also preserved our history by recording the stories of the people who lived it.

The city’s online historic database, Project HOLD, has a large collection of stories gathered through interviews with people who remember the city’s early days. The oral history collection focuses on the stories of our community’s veterans.

(more…)


Mayor Hervey laid foundation for growing community

Dick HerveyJames B. “Dick” Hervey completed his term as College Station’s sixth mayor some 40 years ago, but the impact he made on our rapidly expanding community shouldn’t be underestimated. Mr. Hervey, who died Wednesday at the age of 93, had been the city’s oldest surviving mayor.

A 1942 graduate of Texas A&M, the Greenville native won a special election in 1971 and was the first College Station mayor to have business affiliations. He played a key role in the city’s growth and development, not only as mayor but through his association with Community Savings and Loan.

(more…)


Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Jan. 23)

This is a live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Jan. 23. It’s not the official minutes.

Both meetings are being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and can also be watched online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

6:12 p.m.

The workshop meeting has started.

6:30 p.m.

Historic Preservation Committee Report

HPC Chair Linda Harvell updated the council on the committee’s activities in 2013, including the 75th Anniversary event at the George Bush Library. She said a final expense report for the city’s 75th anniversary activities will be presented to council at a later date with recommendations for the use of any remaining funds. Harvell also presented the committee’s recommendations for 2014 HPC programs.

(more…)


History Blog: Masonic Lodge Hall, Rudder Center Dedications

City of College Station's 75th AnniversaryNOTE: 2013 marks the City of College Station’s 75th year as an incorporated city. In recognition, we’ve highlighted some interesting moments from our past.

This blog was authored by Henry Mayo, a surveyor and long-time resident of the Bryan-College Station area. As a surveyor and historian, Henry retrieves information from local, state and national resources to assemble history-themed messages for email subscribers in a series titled “This Week in Brazos County History.” To subscribe to Henry’s email series, click here.

 

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NEW MASONIC LODGE HALL DEDICATED (Nov. 21, 1952)

NegromasonsVIP MusicThe item on the left from The Eagle on Nov. 20, 1952 tells of the planned open house and dedication ceremony to take place the following days for the new Masonic Lodge Hall.

The photos on the right were taken a few months ago, when I noticed the Masonic cornerstone of the building on North Texas Avenue at 18th CornerstoneStreet. The cornerstone is carved “Laid October 20, 1952,” but apparently things didn’t go on schedule and the ceremony was delayed one month.

(more…)


“Here in 1938” signs highlight homes of historical significance

IMG_2123

You may have noticed “Here in 1938” yard signs in front of several College Station homes, especially in the Southside area. These are homes that existed when College Station was incorporated as a city in 1938, and many have historical markers.

As the city celebrates its 75th anniversary, it’s important to recognize these historical places and the significant role that they played in our city’s history. While these are by no means the only houses here at that time, they are a good representation of homes from that era.

(more…)


History Blog: World War I ended 95 years ago today

City of College Station's 75th AnniversaryNOTE: 2013 marks the City of College Station’s 75th year as an incorporated city. In recognition, we’ve highlighted some interesting moments from our past.

The following message was authored by Henry Mayo, a surveyor and long-time resident of the Bryan-College Station area. As a surveyor and historian, Henry retrieves information from local, state and national resources to assemble history-themed messages for email subscribers in a series titled “This Week in Brazos County History.” To subscribe to Henry’s email series, click here.

 

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ARMISTICE SIGNED – BRYAN MAYOR DECLARES A HOLIDAY (Nov. 11, 1918)

With today being Veterans Day, it’s appropriate that we look back to the end of The Great War, or World War I as it’s known now. The armistice was signed on Monday, Nov. 11, 1918, and was such a greatly anticipated event around the world. The front page of The Eagle ran the headline “Armistice Signed; War Ended Six O’Clock” and carried a holiday proclamation and parade call from Bryan Mayor John M. Lawrence. (more…)


History Blog: College Station incorporated 75 years ago this month

City of College Station's 75th AnniversaryNOTE: 2013 marks the City of College Station’s 75th year as an incorporated city. In recognition, we’ve highlighted some interesting moments from our past.

The following message was authored by Henry Mayo, a surveyor and long-time resident of the Bryan-College Station area. As a surveyor and historian, Henry retrieves information from local, state and national resources to assemble history-themed messages for email subscribers in a series titled “This Week in Brazos County History.” To subscribe to Henry’s email series, click here.

 

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NOTE: Boy, I feel dumb for missing one of the biggest anniversary dates of the year last week. Being on the College Station 75th anniversary planning committee makes it even worse!

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CITIZENS VOTE TO INCORPORATE COLLEGE STATION (Oct. 19, 1938)

I don’t have a copy of The Eagle or Battalion from last week in 1938, but these clippings from The Eagle are in the scanned College Station publicity notebook on Project HOLD.

Incorporation clipsThe item on the right from Oct.18, 1938 tells of an informational meeting at the A&M Chemistry lecture room on Monday, Oct. 17. I believe the “school situation” mentioned refers to the City of Bryan’s recent southward annexation, including part of the A&M Consolidated school district known as Union Hill. (more…)


History Blog: Joe Orr, Inc., helped make College Station into what it is today

City of College Station's 75th AnniversaryNOTE: 2013 marks the City of College Station’s 75th year as an incorporated city. In recognition, we’ve highlighted some interesting moments from our past.

The following message was authored by Henry Mayo, a surveyor and long-time resident of the Bryan-College Station area. As a surveyor and historian, Henry retrieves information from local, state and national resources to assemble history-themed messages for email subscribers in a series titled “This Week in Brazos County History.” To subscribe to Henry’s email series, click here.

 

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JOE ORR INCORPORATES HIS SURVEYING/ENGINEERING BUSINESS (Oct. 14, 1963)

LicenseThis history topic is more important to me than most others, but I’ll try to make it interesting and demonstrate its strong connection to our local history.

After receiving his degree in civil engineering from Texas A&M in 1922, Joseph A. Orr worked on railroad projects in South America before joining the A&M faculty in 1928. He taught civil engineering for the next 40 years, and served on the College Station City Council for more than 25 years (1939-1966). He later served on the planning and zoning commission.

(more…)


History Blog: A different kind of drought ended in 1971

City of College Station's 75th AnniversaryNOTE: 2013 marks the City of College Station’s 75th year as an incorporated city. In recognition, we’ve highlighted some interesting moments from our past.

The following message was authored by Henry Mayo, a surveyor and long-time resident of the Bryan-College Station area. As a surveyor and historian, Henry retrieves information from local, state and national resources to assemble history-themed messages for email subscribers in a series titled “This Week in Brazos County History.” To subscribe to Henry’s email series, click here.

 

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COLLEGE STATION BECOMES FULLY WET (Oct. 9, 1971)

The headline below that appeared on the front of The Eagle, on Sunday, Oct. 10, 1971, was probably a hot topic after church services that morning. The results of this election allowed liquor stores and the sale of alcohol in the form of mixed drinks. This was the birth of the thriving nightclub business in College Station such as the Northgate bars and clubs. The issue was divisive to the community, but the anti-LBD groups seemed to have accepted what the majority of citizens voted for:

Eagle_Oct10_1971P01_CS-Liquor-election[2]

Eagle_Jun06_1956P01_Bootleggers-Moist-County[1] (more…)


History Blog: Old Hrdlicka home had long, storied history

City of College Station's 75th AnniversaryNOTE: 2013 marks the City of College Station’s 75th year as an incorporated city. In recognition, we’ve highlighted some interesting moments from our past.

The following message was authored by Henry Mayo, a surveyor and long-time resident of the Bryan-College Station area. As a surveyor and historian, Henry retrieves information from local, state and national resources to assemble history-themed messages for email subscribers in a series titled “This Week in Brazos County History.” To subscribe to Henry’s email series, click here.

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FORMER HRDLICKA/FUGATE FAMILY HOME BURNS (Sept. 22, 1988) 

The history book that chronicles the College Station Fire Department’s first 25 years (1970-95) includes the following under notable fire calls from 1988:

“September 22 — A house was totally destroyed at Luther Street and Wellborn Road. The house was near collapse from the intense fire on CSFD’s arrival.”

This home and associated businesses have a rich history. In a 1995 interview archived on the City of College Station’s Project HOLD website, Marilyn Hrdlicka Fugate said she was born in the home on Feb. 22, 1922 and that it was built around 1919 by her father, Ed Hrdlicka. It was located on the west corner of a few hundred acres of land owned by the Hrdlicka family. Marilyn and her husband, Jack Fugate, raised their own family there following World War II.

(more…)


History Blog: Solving the puzzle of A&M’s Veterans Village

City of College Station's 75th AnniversaryNOTE: 2013 marks the City of College Station’s 75th year as an incorporated city. In recognition, we’ve highlighted some interesting moments from our past.

The following message was authored by Henry Mayo, a surveyor and long-time resident of the Bryan-College Station area. As a surveyor and historian, Henry retrieves information from local, state and national resources to assemble history-themed messages for email subscribers in a series titled “This Week in Brazos County History.” To subscribe to Henry’s email series, click here.

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VETERANS VILLAGE DUPLEX HOUSES FOR SALE (Sept. 17, 1953)

Duplex clipI had heard of the Texas A&M project houses on Jersey Street (now George Bush) and the married-student College View apartments, but I was puzzled about exactly where Veterans Village was located. In the course of my research, I ran across the ad at the right from The Eagle published on Sept. 17, 1953, which refers to duplex houses.

BlackberryadI also found several classified ads (left) for items for sale by Veterans Village residents. Most ran in the late 1940s. (more…)


A fitting week to celebrate the Bear’s 100th birthday

City of College Station's 75th AnniversaryNOTE: 2013 marks the City of College Station’s 75th year as an incorporated city. In recognition, we’ve highlighted some interesting moments from our past.

The following message was authored by Henry Mayo, a surveyor and long-time resident of the Bryan-College Station area. As a surveyor and historian, Henry retrieves information from local, state and national resources to assemble history-themed messages for email subscribers in a series titled “This Week in Brazos County History.” To subscribe to Henry’s email series, click here.

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PAUL BRYANT IS BORN IN ARKANSAS (Sept. 11, 1913)

Bear BryantI’m not sure if this is something to celebrate in College Station — especially this week — but former Texas A&M and Alabama head football coach Paul “Bear” Bryant would be 100 years old on Wednesday. Fittingly, the Aggies play top-ranked Alabama on Saturday at Kyle Field. The Crimson Tide’s only other visit to College Station was on Dec. 1, 1988, but it was a non-conference game that had been postponed due to the threat of Hurricane Gilbert.

(more…)


Remember when Aggie football tickets were $4?

City of College Station's 75th AnniversaryNOTE: 2013 marks the City of College Station’s 75th year as an incorporated city. In recognition, we’ve highlighted some interesting moments from our past.

This blog was authored by Henry Mayo, a surveyor and long-time resident of the Bryan-College Station area. As a surveyor and historian, Henry retrieves information from local, state and national resources to assemble history-themed messages for email subscribers in a series titled “This Week in Brazos County History.” To subscribe to Henry’s email series, click here.

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BRYAN SCHOOLS ORDERED TO INTEGRATE (July 30, 1963)

This article from the front page of the The Eagle 50 years ago is self-explanatory. The stair-step method mentioned allowed the integration process to be phased in by grade levels to allow the school district to make facility, staff and acceptance adjustments more gradually. In College Station, the stair-step method had started but after a few years, Lincoln School burned and the remainder of the integration process was implemented immediately. (more…)


Learning about a former city councilman — and saying farewell

Dr. Joseph J. McGrawmcgrawRecently, Place-4 City Councilman John Nichols brought me a copy of an obituary for Dr. Joseph J. McGraw (right), which appeared in a recent edition of The Bryan-College Station Eagle.

I didn’t immediately recognize Dr. McGraw’s name, but I should’ve: He served on the College Station City Council in 1969-70, and also volunteered his time as a member of the College Station Planning & Zoning Commission.

Judging from his obituary, McGraw clearly lived a life filled with love of his country, his community and his family. The World War II veteran passed away June 3 at the age of 86. He taught in the College of Architecture at Texas A&M University and later became director of Planning for the College of Medicine at University of Kuwait.

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History Blog: Much has changed in my 50 years in BCS

City of College Station's 75th AnniversaryNOTE: 2013 marks the City of College Station’s 75th year as an incorporated city. In recognition, we’ve highlighted some interesting moments from our past.

This blog was authored by Henry Mayo, a surveyor and long-time resident of the Bryan-College Station area. As a surveyor and historian, Henry retrieves information from local, state and national resources to assemble history-themed messages for email subscribers in a series titled “This Week in Brazos County History.” To subscribe to Henry’s email series, click here.

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PERSONAL MILESTONE HIGHLIGHTS ST. JOSEPH’S HISTORY 

Pardon me for imposing my personal history on you, but Tuesday is a historic day fo me. I was born June 18, 1963 at St. Joseph Hospital in Bryan.

The hospital was located west of downtown Bryan and opened as Bryan Hospital in 1913. It was reopened as St. Joseph Hospital in 1936. The building is still standing and used as apartments, I believe.

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Did Marty Robbins prefer College Station over El Paso?

As I read Henry Mayo’s terrific blog on Monday about the 40th anniversary of Richard Petty’s NASCAR win at the Texas World Speedway, I came across an interesting tidbit. As a long-time fan of classic country music, I noticed that Marty Robbins finished 29th in the same race.

And, no, he didn’t wear A White Sport Coat (and a Pink Carnation).

(more…)