Posts tagged “Parking

Posting your own “No Parking” sign isn’t a solution

By Esmeralda, Casas, Neighborhood and Community Relations Coordinator

Have you ever returned home to your nice, quiet neighborhood to find an unfamiliar vehicle parked on the street in front of your house? Regardless of whether the car belongs to a neighbor or one of their guests, you find it inconsiderate and annoying.

You call the police and the city’s code enforcement department, but they both tell you that for them to take any action, the vehicle must be blocking a driveway, facing traffic, or be otherwise improperly parked. Neither your neighbor nor his guest has violated the law.

You’re a little miffed to discover you have no legal entitlement to public parking spaces in front of your house. While it may be a nuisance when someone else parks there, it’s not against the law.

In frustration, you post an official-looking sign near your curb. The words “No Parking” in big, red letters are clear for everyone to see.

Problem solved? Not by a long shot.

State law prohibits you from placing or trying to enforce traffic-directing signs on public streets. That means your neighbor hasn’t broken the law – you have. Only city employees can legally install such signs.

If you think that scenario doesn’t happen, think again. We’ve seen a significant rise in residents posting unauthorized signs, especially no parking signs.

The bottom line is that streets maintained by the city are for public use. Unless an authorized sign states otherwise, they are available for anyone to park along.

That doesn’t mean the problem has no solution. The most effective course of action is to have a friendly talk with your neighbor. In most cases, you can work something out.

To report unauthorized signs or improperly parked vehicles, contact Code Enforcement at 979-764-6363 or submit your concern to SeeClickFix.

 


About the Blogger

Esmeralda Casas is in her first year as the city’s neighborhood and community relations coordinator. She previously served as an education and outreach specialist with the Sexual Assualt Resource Center and as the communications coordinator for The Salvation Army of Bryan/College Station. A Rio Grande Valley native, Esmeralda earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Texas A&M in 2016.


 

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5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (about 5 p.m.) and regular (6 p.m.) meetings.

Here are five items to watch:

  1. Residential Parking: In the workshop, the council will discuss city ordinances, policies, and practices related to parking in residential areas, including school zones, removal policies, pavement coverage on residential lots, and Aggie football game day parking. The council will also review updates on the city’s traffic calming policy.
  2. Greens Prairie Trail Widening: As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider a $3.28 million contract the reconstruction of Greens Prairie Trail from the city limit west of Woodlake intersection to Royder Road. The project will replace the existing asphalt road with a four-lane minor arterial concrete road.
  3. Fun for All Playground Phase 2: The council will consider a $1.8 million contract for Phase 2 of the Fun for All Playground at Central Park. The second phase includes a stadium with bleachers and a quarter-scale artificial turf field. Citizens and charitable organizations donated about $1.3 million for the project, and $546,000 comes from parkland funds.
  4. FY20 Budget, Tax Rate Adoption: In separate items, the council will consider adopting the proposed FY20 budget and property tax rate. The $341.2 million budget includes a general fund of $105.2 million and capital projects totaling $57.9 million. The proposed tax rate of $0.534618 per $100 assessed value is a $.028778-cent increase and would generate $51.7 million for debt service and city operations. The owner of an average-price home in College Station ($280,000) would pay about $8.58 more per month.
  5. Texas Independence Ballpark Midtown College Station: The council will consider officially naming the new park on Rock Prairie Road East as Texas Independence Ballpark Midtown College Station. The council will also consider naming the complex’s eight ball fields as Gonzales, Goliad, Alamo, San Jacinto, Sabine River, Rio Grande, Red River, and Lone Star. The park had been temporarily called Southeast Park.

Related Links:                                                                 

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (July 11)

Sitting (L-R): Mayor Pro Tem Linda Harvell, Mayor Karl Mooney, Eleanor Vessali. Standing (L-R): Bob Brick, Jerome Rektorik, John Nichols, Dennis Maloney.

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, July 11. It’s not the official minutes.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink channel 19 or online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:17 p.m.

The workshop has started. The council took no action out of the executive session. 

5:18 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. No items were pulled for workshop discussion.

5:44 p.m.

Legislative Update

The council reviewed the recent Texas legislative session, including items affecting the city’s budget process. 

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:13 p.m.

Community Development Grants

The council discussed the FY20 Community Development Budget and Action Plan. Funding available in the FY20 budget totals $2.9 million, including new federal Community Development Block Grants of about $1.2 million and HOME Investment Partnership Grants of $473,289.

The funds may only be used to benefit low- and moderate-income people, aid in the elimination of slum and blighting influences, or meet an urgent need.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:16 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar and received committee reports. The regular meeting will start after a short break.

6:24 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

6:49 p.m.

Hear Visitors

Eight people spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens might address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda.

  • Councilwoman Elianor Vessali recognized Army Capt. Orlando A. Bonilla as part of the Fallen Heroes Project. The 27-year-old Killeen native died on Jan. 28, 2005, in a helicopter accident near Baghdad, Iraq.
  • Diane Davis, Julian McMurrey, Patsy Johnson, and Michelle Raisor spoke about Thomas Park and the restoration of the pool.
  • Donald Deere spoke about the removal of street parking in his neighborhood.
  • Brian Alg spoke against using taxpayer funds for a proposed YMCA.
  • Donna Lamkin spoke about the removal of street parking in the Camelot neighborhood.

6:50 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • An estimated annual expenditure of $121,000 for water meters from National Meter & Automation.
  • Renewal of an annual estimated $200,000 contract with Spherion Staffing for temporary personnel services.
  • A $112,225.40 change order for the contract with Garney Construction for Well No. 9.
  • Annual price agreement renewals not to exceed $1.9 million with Knife River ($1.49 Million) and BPI Materials ($438,000) for hot mix asphalt for street maintenance.

6:57 p.m.

Graham Road Speed Limit

The council voted unanimously to reduce the speed limit on Graham Road from 45 mph to 40. A resident requested the change last fall primarily out of concern for the new school at Graham and Longmire, and the city conducted a speed study in April.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:24 p.m.

Camelot Parking Removal 

The council voted unanimously to removed parking on one side of Langford Street, King Arthur Circle, and Lancelot Circle to allow for emergency vehicle access.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:48 p.m.

City Hall Exterior Design

The council reviewed the proposed exterior design of the new city hall on the site of the existing building on Texas Avenue. 

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:49 p.m.

The council discussed and reviewed future agenda items, and Mayor Mooney adjourned the meeting.

The council meets again Thursday, July 25.

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (about 5 p.m.) and regular (6 p.m.) meetings.

Here are five items to watch:

  1. Legislative Update: In the workshop, the council will review the recent Texas legislative session, including items affecting the city’s budget process.
  2. Community Development Grants: The council will have a workshop discussion about the FY20 Community Development Budget and Action Plan, which includes $2.9 million in federal grants.
  3. Graham Road Speed Limit: In the regular meeting, the council will consider reducing the speed limit on Graham Road from 45 to 40 mph.
  4. Camelot Parking Removal: The council will consider removing parking from one side of Langford Street, King Arthur Circle, and Lancelot Circle to allow for emergency vehicle access.
  5. City Hall Exterior Design: The council will take a look at the proposed exterior design of the new city hall planned on the site of the existing building on Texas Avenue.

Related Links:                                                                 

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


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Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (May 23)

Sitting (L-R): Mayor Pro Tem Linda Harvell, Mayor Karl Mooney, Eleanor Vessali. Standing (L-R): Bob Brick, Jerome Rektorik, John Nichols, Dennis Maloney.

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, May 23. It’s not the official minutes.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink channel 19 or online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:24 p.m.

The workshop has started. The council took no action out of the executive session.

5:25 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled no consent items for workshop discussion.

5:50 p.m.

Economic Development Update

The council reviewed the city’s economic development efforts and discussed ways to enhance our economic competitiveness. 

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:28 p.m.

Fire Asset Reliability

The council reviewed the Fire Department’s adequacy and response reliability.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:32 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar and received committee reports. The regular meeting will start after a short break.

6:38 p.m.

The regular meeting has started. Mayor Mooney said item No. 3 on the regular agenda (parking restrictions on Langford, King Arthur, Guadalupe, and Lancelot) has been pulled and will not be considered tonight.

6:58 p.m.

Hear Visitors

Seven people spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens might address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda.

  • Councilwoman Elianor Vessali recognized Army Capt. Sean P. Sims as part of the Fallen Heroes Project. The 32-year-old El Paso native died on Nov. 13, 2004, when his unit received small arms fire while clearing a building in Fallujah, Iraq.
  • Carlos Espina, Eduardo Espina, Carlos Prida, and Raphael Cruzan asked the council to bring soccer fields back to Anderson Park.
  • Donald and Patsy Deere spoke against the proposed parking restrictions on Langford, King Arthur, Guadalupe, and Lancelot. That item has been pulled from tonight’s agenda.

6:59 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • A $287,305 contract with Air-Tech Brazos Valley for facilities corrective maintenance services.
  • The $330,029.53 purchase of furnishings from multiple vendors for the renovated Larry J. Ringer Library.
  • An ordinance amendment that clarifies that customers are responsible for placing solid waste containers out for collection and for removing them afterward.
  • An ordinance amendment that clarifies that payment is not a defense for a violation of prohibited parking. Some Northgate parking spaces transition at times to prohibited parking for loading zones or passenger pick-up and the payment system can’t prohibit payment during these times.
  • An ordinance amendment that increases the civil fine for parking without paying in the Northgate Garage from $50 to $115 for payment within 10 days and from $60 to $125 for payment after 10 days.

7:14 p.m.

Parking Restrictions on Poplar, Ash, Live Oak and Nimitz

The council voted unanimously to remove stopping, standing, and parking along one side of Poplar, Live Oak, Ash, and Nimitz Streets, and on one side of a segment of Edelweiss Avenue from 7-9 a.m. and 2-3:30 p.m. on school days.

Ash Street residents contacted the city about cars parked on both sides of the road that could impede emergency vehicle access. Additional evaluation led the Traffic Management Team to also recommend parking restrictions on Poplar, Live Oak, and Nimitz.

The principal of Rock Prairie Elementary contacted the city about cars parked on both sides of the road during the afternoon pick-up times, which affects the ability to see children crossing. In addition, when vehicles park along Edelweiss, the road effectively becomes a single-lane roadway for a two-direction operation.

Here are the PowerPoint presentations:

7:22 p.m.

Landscaping and Mowing Contract

The council voted unanimously to approve a $1.06 million contract with Green Teams for citywide mowing and landscape maintenance. The contract does not include regional parks and athletic fields.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:31 p.m.

Wellborn-Holleman Intersection

The council voted unanimously to approve an advance funding agreement with the Texas Department of Transportation for improvements at the Wellborn Road-Holleman Drive intersection. The agreement has no budgetary impact and covers work within the state’s right-of-way. 

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:33 p.m.

Southwood Valley Sewer Line

The council voted unanimously to approve a $1.22 million contract with Palasota Contracting for the Southwood Valley Trunk Line Phase 1 Project to increase capacity for development.

The project area starts about 160 feet south of Bee Creek on the west side of State Highway 6, runs south for about 1,000 feet toward the northwest corner of FM 2818 and State Highway 6, then goes southwest about 1,250 feet toward Brothers Boulevard.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:38 p.m.

Highway 6 Gateway Sign

The council voted unanimously to approve a $149,486 contract with JaCody Construction for a gateway sign located just north of Peach Creek Cutoff along State Highway 6 within TxDOT right-of-way.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:44 p.m.

The council discussed and reviewed future agenda items, and Mayor Mooney adjourned the meeting. The council meets again on Thursday, June 13.

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (about 5 p.m.) and regular (6 p.m.) meetings.

Here are five items to watch:

  1. Economic Development: In the workshop, the council will review the city’s economic development efforts and discuss ways to enhance College Station’s economic competitiveness.
  2. Parking Removals: In separate items, the council will consider a trio of ordinance amendments to remove stopping, standing, and parking along Poplar Street, Live Oak Street, Ash Street, Nimitz Street, Langford, King Arthur, Guadalupe, and Lancelot to provide emergency vehicle access; and Edelweiss Avenue during pickup and dropoff times at Rock Prairie Elementary.
  3. Wellborn-Holleman Intersection: The council will consider an advance funding agreement with the Texas Department of Transportation for improvements at the Wellborn Road-Holleman Drive intersection.
  4. Southwood Valley Sewer Line: The council will consider a $1.22 million contract with Palasota Contracting for the Southwood Valley Trunk Line Phase 1 Project that will increase capacity for development.
  5. Gateway Signage: The council will consider a $149,486 contract with JaCody Construction for a gateway sign to be located just north of Peach Creek Cutoff along State Highway 6 within TxDOT right-of-way.

Related Links:                                                                 

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Jan. 24)

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Jan. 24. It’s not the official minutes.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink channel 19 or online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:33 p.m.

The workshop has started. No action was taken out of executive session. (more…)


5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (5 p.m.) and regular (6 p.m.) meetings.

Here are five items to watch: (more…)


5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (5 p.m.) and regular (6 p.m.) meetings.

Here are five items to watch:

  1. False Fire Alarm Fees: In the workshop, the council will consider allowing the Fire Department to charge a fee for more than three false alarms in 12 months.
  2. City Hall Design Contract: As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider a $2 million contract with Kirksey Architecture for the design of a new city hall.
  3. Tax Rate/Budget Public Hearings: The council will conduct the final public hearings on the city’s proposed tax rate and budget for the 2019 fiscal year. The proposed tax rate is .505841 cents per $100 of assessed value. The proposed budget totals $360.7 million.
  4. Single-Family Parking: After a public hearing, the council will consider amending the city’s Unified Development Ordinance to remove the cap of requiring no more than four parking spaces for a single-family dwelling unit in areas designated Neighborhood Conservation in the Comprehensive Plan.
  5. BioCorridor Rezoning: After a public hearing, the council will consider a request to amend the terms and development standards of the BioCorridor Planned Development District, which covers about 147 acres between State Highway 47, Raymond Stotzer Parkway, Turkey Creek Parkway, and the city limit.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Channels 19 or online. We’ll post a detailed live blog on this site.

Related Links:                                                                 

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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Game day parking doesn’t have to be a hassle

By Julie Caler, Code Enforcement Supervisor

For football fans, following your favorite team to Kyle Field can be tricky. With tens of thousands of fans descending on a relatively small area, finding a place to park your vehicle can be daunting.

Visitors understandably want to park as close to the stadium as possible, and that creates challenges for our guests and residents, especially in the Southside neighborhood. Making sure everyone abides by our city parking ordinances is a major test for city staff, too.

Our parking ordinances are designed to make our streets and neighborhoods safe. Emergency vehicles need to be able to respond if needed, and cars must be kept off yards to prevent fires, broken meters, broken gas lines, or other problems. The College Station Police Department, Code Enforcement, and the Northgate District staff work together to provide a safe environment for you on game day.

Street Parking

Many of the streets in the Southside area were developed years ago and are exceptionally narrow. Police officers will be looking for vehicles parked facing traffic, blocking a fire hydrant, parking too close to a traffic control device such as stop sign, blocking intersections, and parking in a no parking zone, to name a few. You also can’t directly block a driveway, but that doesn’t mean you can’t park across the street.

Some of these are violations of state law, and a few are towable offenses. If you are parked illegally in certain areas, your vehicle will likely be towed. If you discover your vehicle has been towed, call the Police Department’s non-emergency number at 979-764-3600.

Yard Parking

Code Enforcement Staff will be actively looking for vehicles parking in yards. We discourage residents from illegally selling parking spots on their property. If we find a vehicle parked in the yard, we issue a warning to the resident in person and with a letter. If it’s a rental property, we also inform the property owner and management company.

If the violation happens again on another game day, we may issue a citation or court summons for the property owner and resident.  If you have any questions about this or any other city ordinance, call Code Enforcement at 979-764-6363.

Northgate Parking

The Northgate District provides safe and affordable parking options, including the Northgate Parking Garage, which is just a short walk to Kyle Field. The special game day rate is $25. If you park in the garage, you don’t have to worry about parking in the wrong place or being towed.

We also have limited parking available on certain Northgate streets and in the surface parking lot. The game day rate for both options is $3.50 an hour and is applicable from 6 a.m. Saturday until 3 a.m. Sunday.

For more information about the Northgate Parking Garage, including the availability of parking spaces, call 979-764-6313.

 

For general questions about parking or Code Enforcement, please feel free to contact me at 979-764-6363 or jcaler@cstx.gov.

Game Day Information

Here are some maps and other information that we hope will move you around town as quickly as possible on Aggie game days:

Gig ‘em, Aggies!

 


0000018EPAbout the Blogger

Code Enforcement Supervisor Julie Caler has been with the City of College Station for almost two decades.


 

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How to avoid the aggravation of parking tickets

By Eric Chapman, Community Services District Supervisor

Getting a parking ticket is never fun, and it’s always frustrating. It can also cost you a ton of cash – as much as $520 for violations related to handicap parking.

Most parking tickets are issued for violations of local parking ordinances, which are civil offenses. In some cases, you can also be cited for breaking state laws, which are criminal violations under the Texas Transportation Code.

A parking ticket won’t affect your driving record unless you ignore it, throw it away or put it in your glove compartment and forget about it. Failing to deal with a ticket promptly can have serious consequences — including expensive fines – and can result in your vehicle being booted, towed, and impounded. In some cases, you can even lose your driving privileges.

Parking problems always exist in growing communities, especially college towns expanding as quickly as College Station. Most of the time, avoiding the headache of a parking violation is as simple as reading and obeying parking signs.

Our goal is to keep our residential streets safe and accessible for everyone – especially emergency vehicles – while making your parking experience as hassle-free as possible.

The photo montage below illustrates the most common parking mistakes we see in College Station.

For additional information or to check on local parking ordinances, call 979-764-6313.

 


About the Blogger

Eric Chapman is in his ninth year with the city’s Community Service’s Department and has been a district supervisor since 2013.  He worked for Tarrant County from 2005-08 and was a federal correctional officer in Warkworth, Ontario, from 1997-2005. He graduated with honors from Loyalist College in Belleville, Ontario, in 1996.


 

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Game day parking doesn’t have to be a hassle

By Julie Caler, Code Enforcement Supervisor

For football fans, following your favorite team for a road game can be tricky. With tens of thousands of fans descending on a relatively small area, finding a place to park can be daunting.

That’s certainly the case in College Station.

Visitors understandably want to park as close to Kyle Field as possible, and that creates challenges for our guests and residents, especially in the Southside neighborhood. Making sure everyone abides by our city parking ordinances is a major test for city staff, too.

The laws are designed to ensure that our streets and neighborhoods are safe, which means emergency vehicles can respond if needed, and cars are kept off the grass to prevent fires, broken meters, broken gas lines, or other problems. The College Station Police Department, Code Enforcement, and the Northgate District staff work together to provide a safe environment for you on game day.

Street Parking

Many of the streets in the Southside area were developed years ago and are exceptionally narrow. Police officers will be looking for vehicles parked facing traffic, blocking a fire hydrant, parking too close to a traffic control device such as stop sign, blocking intersections, and parking in a no parking zone, to name a few. You also can’t directly block a driveway, but that doesn’t mean you can’t park across the street.

Some of these are violations of state law, and a few are towable offenses. If you are parked illegally in certain areas, your vehicle will likely be towed. If you discover your vehicle has been towed, call the Police Department’s non-emergency number at 979-764-3600.

Yard Parking

Code Enforcement Staff will be actively looking for vehicles parking in yards. We discourage residents from illegally selling parking spots on their property. If we find a vehicle parked in the yard, we issue a warning to the resident in person and with a letter. If it’s a rental property, we also inform the property owner and management company.

If the violation happens again on another game day, we may issue a citation or court summons for the property owner and resident.  If you have any questions about this or any other city ordinance, call Code Enforcement at 979-764-6363.

Northgate Parking

The Northgate District provides numerous safe and affordable parking options, including the Northgate Parking Garage, which is just a short walk to Kyle Field. The special game day rate is $25. If you park in the garage, you don’t have to worry about parking in the wrong place or being towed.

We also have limited parking available on certain Northgate streets and in the surface parking lot. The game day rate for both options is $3.50 an hour and is applicable from 6 a.m. Saturday until 3 a.m. Sunday.

For more information about the Northgate Parking Garage, including the availability of parking spaces, call 979-764-6313.

For general questions about parking or Code Enforcement, please feel free to contact me at 979-764-6363 or jcaler@cstx.gov.

Game Day Information

IMG_4223Here are some maps and other information that we hope will move you around town as quickly as possible on Aggie game days:

Gig ‘em, Aggies!

 


0000018EPAbout the Author

Code Enforcement Supervisor Julie Caler has been with the City of College Station for 18 years.


 

If you found value in this blog post, please share it with your social network and friends!

 


Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Aug. 24)

Back (L-R): Linda Harvell, Jerome Rektorik, James Benham, Barry Moore. Front (L-R): Blanche Brick, Mayor Karl Mooney, Julie Schultz.

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Aug. 24. It’s not the official minutes.

The meeting is being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channels 19 and 119 (HD) and online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:34 p.m.

The workshop has started. Councilwoman Julie Schultz is absent tonight.

No action was taken out of executive session.

5:57 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled these consent items for workshop discussion:

  • Graham Substation Equipment: The equipment purchased through this bid requires a significant delivery time from the date of purchase and is be installed during the construction of the Graham Road Substation in 2018. The equipment to be purchased includes transformers, a gas circuit breaker, circuit switchers, and 3-phase electric substation transformers. The bid includes delivery, set-up of the transformers on the foundations, filling with oil, and testing.
  • Four-Way Stop at Thomas/Dexter: The intersection of Thomas Street and Dexter Drive has stop signs on the Thomas Street approaches. An area resident expresses concerns about appropriate sight lines. Traffic Engineering found that the sight line for vehicles at the stop sign on the westbound approach was inadequate to see vehicles approaching the from the left on Dexter. Consequently, Traffic Engineering recommends making it a four-way stop controlled intersection.
  • Brazos Valley Recycling: Staff recommends renewal of years 3-5 of a five-year franchise agreement and general services contract with Brazos Valley Recycling for the collection, processing, and marketing of recyclable materials. The city pays an annual cost of $880,000. Recycling collection services and associated public education programs account for $3.18 of the $14.40 monthly sanitation fee charged to each customer.
  • Water Well No. 9: The project includes the installation of Well  No. 9 and a collection line on city property to add additional pumping capacity to match population projections and state requirements. Final project costs are expected to be less than what was budgeted in FY17.
  • Water Line Relocation: Staff recommends approval of a construction contract for the installation of a water line west of the FM2818-FM60 intersection. The existing 30-inch water line will be removed or filled with grout.

6:04 p.m.

BVSWMA FY18 Budget

The council approved the Brazos Valley Solid Waste Management Agency’s proposed budget for FY18, which includes $8.92 million in revenues and $9.44 million in expenses. The budget also reduces the gate rate from $20.50 to $20.00 per ton from Bryan and College Station.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:20 p.m.

Park Preserves in ETJ

The council heard a presentation about potential parkland in the city’s 3½-mile extraterritorial jurisdiction. The discussion covered parkland needs and possibilities and included the Parks and Recreation Master Plan, current parks and greenways properties, current land purchase efforts, the Parkland Dedication Ordinance, and possible funding.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:28 p.m.

Traffic Control Center Award

The council heard a presentation about the national Public Agency Council Achievement Award received by the Traffic Systems and Traffic Engineering divisions for the city’s Traffic Control Center (TCC). The award was presented at the Institute of Transportation Engineers annual meeting in Toronto. Pictured below (L-R) are Traffic Signal Technician Jimmy Pletzer, Traffic Signal Technician Juan Gonzalez, Jr., Traffic Systems Superintendent Lee Robinson, Mayor Mooney, Traffic Engineer Troy Rother, and Traffic Systems Foreman Garrett Martinek.

This award recognizes agencies that have achieved excellence through implementing innovative ideas and delivering outstanding transportation engineering, planning, and operations. The TCC helps improve traffic conditions with new technologies and allows signal timings to be changed in real-time during special events or roadway incidents.

Signal performance measure software also allows city staff to better monitor and adjust traffic signal operations. The City of College Station was the first agency in Texas to implement signal performance measures, and others are following our lead.

The TCC pulls together video streams from more than 100 cameras that are shared with the Police and Fire Departments as well as Texas A&M. The video streams are critical when moving 120,000 fans away from Kyle Field after football games. Staff from Traffic Systems, Traffic Engineering and the Police Department man the TCC during the postgame operations, observing the video streams and manipulating signal timings. The TCC is in constant communication with the Kyle Field command center.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:42 p.m.

Bloomberg Mayors Challenge

The council discussed the city’s participation in Bloomberg Philanthropies 2017 Mayors Challenge. The initiative is designed to help city leaders think big, be bold and uncover inventive and shareable ideas to tackle problems, deliver results and improve life for residents.

Entrants will receive expert guidance to develop their ideas and will join Bloomberg’s cities network, which identifies, elevates, and promotes innovations that work. The 35 Champion Cities will win up to $100,000 to test their ideas and build local support. The five cities with the best ideas will receive millions to implement their ideas at scale.

6:47 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar and received committee reports. The regular meeting will start at 7 p.m.

7:06 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

7:11 p.m.

The mayor proclaimed September as Still Creek Ranch Month.

7:20 p.m.

Hear Visitors

Two people spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens might address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda.

  • Ben Roper recognized Marine Lance Corporal Todd R. Bolding as part of the Fallen Heroes Memorial program. The 23-year-old Manvel native died June 3, 2004, after being wounded in hostile action in Al Anbar Province, Iraq.
  • Fred Dupriest of the Southside Neighborhood Advocacy Group spoke about the city’s planning terminology, specifically how mitigation is not necessarily a benefit.
  • Michael Kuitu and Cathy Liles submitted written comments.

7:23 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted 6-0 to approve the consent agenda:

  • A $316,746 purchase of various long lead time major equipment for the proposed Graham Substation.
  • A purchase not to exceed $1,145,926 of two 3-phase electric substation transformers for the proposed Graham Road Substation.
  • Renewal of the recycling collection franchise ordinance and service agreement with Brazos Valley Recycling not to exceed $880,000 or the number of customers multiplied by the approved agreement rates.
  • A $5.6 million contract with Garney Construction to install water well No. 9 and a collection line.
  • A $433,552 contract with Dudley Construction to relocate the 30-inch water line at FM2818 and FM60.

This item was pulled from tonight’s agenda:

  • Modifications to the Research Valley Partnership’s bylaws.

This item was voted on separately:

  • The council voted 6-0 to approve the addition of a four-way stop intersection at Thomas Street and Dexter Drive. Councilwoman Brick requested this item be pulled for a separate vote so she could thank the neighborhood residents and city staff.

7:49 p.m.

Plantation Oaks Addition Land Use

After a public hearing, the council voted 5-1 to deny a request to change the land use designation from Suburban Commercial to General Commercial for about 1.3 acres north of University Oaks Boulevard on the west side of Earl Rudder Freeway. Councilman Barry Moore supported the motion. Three people spoke against the change in the public hearing.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:59 p.m.

Plantation Oaks Addition Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted 6-0 to deny a request to change the zoning district boundaries from Office to General Commercial for the same property in the previous item. Two people spoke against the change in the public hearing.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:04 p.m.

Koppe Bridge Land Use

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the land use designation from Suburban Commercial to General Commercial for about 1.7 acres on the east side of Wellborn Road where Koppe Bridge Bar & Grill is located. The change will make the tract conform with property to the north that will be developed into an HEB store.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:06 p.m.

Koppe Bridge Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the land use designation from Rural to General Commercial for the same property in the previous item.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:51 p.m.

Off-Street Parking Standards

After a public hearing, the council unanimously approved amended off-street parking standards in the city’s Unified Development Ordinance to provide flexibility and reduce regulatory barriers. One person spoke in the public hearing.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:56 p.m.

The council discussed and reviewed future agenda items.

8:56 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the meeting. The council meets again on Monday, Sept. 11.

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also been a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.



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5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (5:30 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:

  1. Park Preserves in ETJ: In the workshop, the council will discuss parkland needs and possibilities in the city’s 3½-mile extraterritorial jurisdiction.
  2. Traffic Control Center Award: The council will recognize the city’s Traffic Systems and Traffic Engineering divisions for the national award they received for the innovative Traffic Control Center.
  3. Four-Way Stop at Thomas/Dexter: As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider a request to add a four-way stop at the intersection of Thomas Street and Dexter Drive to improve safety.
  4. Water Well No. 9: Also on the consent agenda is a $5.6 million contract for the construction of the city’s ninth water well to add capacity to meet population projections.
  5. Off-Street Parking Standards: After a public hearing, the council will consider amending the off-street parking standards in the city’s Unified Development Ordinance to provide flexibility and reduce regulatory barriers.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Channels 19 and 119 (HD), or online. The website includes an archive of previous council meetings. We’ll post a detailed live blog on this site.

Related Links:                                                                 

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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Live Blog: Monday’s city council meetings (May 16)

2014 Council

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Monday, May 16. It’s not the official minutes.

The meeting is being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and streamed online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:28 p.m.

The workshop has started. Councilman James Benham is absent tonight.

5:45 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled these consent items for workshop discussion:

  • University Drive Pedestrian Safety Improvements:  The resolution would allow the mayor to sign an advance funding agreement with the Texas Department of Transportation for cost participation in the University Drive Pedestrian Improvements Project, which will begin at near Lodge and extend through College Avenue. The project will improve pedestrian mobility and safety while balancing acceptable levels of traffic.

 

  • Water Service Area Swap: The objective is to clean up the official boundary lines of the water service area to allow the city and Wellborn Special Utility District to serve where they are best positioned and make the water system more efficient. The changes affect four locations and have been endorsed by the WSUD board.
  • Fitch-Victoria Traffic Signal: The project will include new traffic and pedestrian crossing signals at the intersection of Fitch Parkway and Victoria Avenue along with associated pavement markings and sidewalks. The signal is expected to be operating by the fall.
  • Munson Avenue Construction Contract: The Munson Avenue Rehabilitation Project will rehabilitate Munson Avenue from Lincoln Avenue to Dominic Drive. The improvements will include new concrete pavement, the rehabilitation of water and wastewater lines and the installation of a section of underground duct bank for future electrical utilities.

6:50 p.m.

CVB Performance Audit

The council discussed city Internal Auditor Ty Elliott’s audit of the Bryan-College Station Convention and Visitor’s Bureau, which receives most of the city’s hotel occupancy tax revenue.

Elliott said the CVB’s accounting procedures and controls have improved since the last audit in 2011 but added that the CVB also has a relatively large amount of liquid assets. In addition, certain cost analysis methods may be able to aid the CVB in better understanding project returns.

According to Elliott, the CVB’s direct impact on bringing events to the College Station and Bryan area has not significantly changed since 2011, with the most impact being on sports events. The CVB’s expenditures have also increased since 2011, especially on marketing and personnel.

Elliott said employee turnover at the CVB appears to be high and that some of CVB’s strategic goals seem disconnected from its mission. He added that the Destination Marketing Association International calculator could be a useful tool for internal CVB decision making, but policymakers should be skeptical of using the calculator to provide justification for funding requests.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation received by the council:

7:07 p.m.

Status of Police Facility Design

The council was updated on the design status of a new police facility at the southeast corner of the Dartmouth Street-Krenek Tap Road intersection. 

The consensus of the council was to move forward with the size estimate of 79,000 square feet and to modify the Krenek Tap Overlay to better accommodate construction. Upon the recommendation of staff, the council decided not to house Fire Department administrators in the building. 

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation received by the council:

7:11 p.m.

The mayor adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar, future agenda items, and committee reports. The regular meeting will start after a short break.

7:19 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

7:23 p.m.

National Public Works Week

Mayor Nancy Berry proclaimed this as National Public Works Week with a presentation to several employees of the city’s Public Works Department. The week is designed to recognize the contributions public works officials make every day to our health, safety, comfort, and quality of life.

Pictured below with Mayor Nancy Berry are Senior Traffic Engineer Troy Rother, Assistant Director of Public Works Emily Fisher, Street/Drainage/Irrigation Superintendent Marshall Wallace, and Crew Leader Jason Best.

PublicWorks

7:25 p.m.

National Bike Month

Mayor Berry proclaimed May as National Bike Month with a presentation to members of the city’s Bicycle, Pedestrian and Greenways Advisory Board. Sponsored by the League of American Bicyclists, National Bike Month promotes bicycling as a healthy activity that helps the environment. Pictured with Mayor Berry below are Councilwoman Blanche Brick, Greenways Program Manager Venessa Garza, and Bicycle, Pedestrian and Greenways board members Tina Evans and Brandon Boatcallie.

BicycleMonth

7:28 p.m.

Annual Arts Council Scholarships

The Arts Council of Brazos Valley and Brazos Valley Art League, through the generous support of the Astin Winkler Charitable Trust, award multiple scholarships each year to promising young artists in the Brazos Valley. The College Art Scholarship is open to graduating seniors in Brazos, Burleson, Grimes, Leon, Madison, Robertson, or Washington counties who will attend an accredited college or university with a course of study in the arts, culture or heritage fields. 

This year’s scholarship recipients are Ester Araujo and Bryson Bounds from A&M Consolidated High School, and Mitchell Bradford of College Station High School. Pictured below with these excellent students are their families, members of the College Station City Council and representatives of the Arts Council Brazos Valley.

ArtsCouncilScholarships

7:39 p.m.

Brazos Valley Fashion Week

The mayor received a donation of $43,361.02 from Brazos Valley Fashion Week to benefit the Fun for All Playground at Beachy Central Park. Upon completion, this playground for people of all ages and abilities will be the only facility of its kind in the region. Considerable work and support for the cause came from students of Lindsay Zahn’s Project-Based Sociology Class at A&M Consolidated High School, who produced this video:

Representing that class tonight were Kacey Corbett, Jailene Lopez and Hailey Phillips, who are pictured below with members of the College Station City Council, representatives of the Rotary, Lions and Kiwanis clubs who are spearheading the private fundraising, Parks and Recreation Department employees, and project supporters.

Funforall

7:43 p.m.

Hear Visitors

One person spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens may address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda. Ben Roper recognized Army Pfc. James D. Parker as part of the Fallen Heroes Memorial program. The 20-year-old Bryan native died Jan. 21, 2004 in a mortar attack near Ba’qubah, Iraq. Members of the Parker family were present for the recognition.

7:43 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted 6-0 to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • A resolution allowing the mayor to sign an advance funding agreement with the Texas Department of Transportation for the city’s cost participation in the University Drive Pedestrian Improvements Project.
  • Changes to the water service area boundaries between the city and the Wellborn Special Utilities District.
  • A change order reducing the Graham Road Rehabilitation Project contract with Elliott Construction by $96,826.
  • A contract not-to-exceed $150,000 with Crossroads Asphalt Preservation for the surface sealing of city streets.
  • A $182,645.29 contract with Jamail & Smith Construction for facility corrective maintenance services. Contract pricing is available through an interlocal cooperative purchasing agreement with Buyboard.
  • A $66,895.25 contract with Binkley & Barfield for professional engineering services related to the design of traffic signal and intersection improvements at the intersections of Harvey Road at George Bush Drive East and Harvey Mitchell Parkway at Longmire Drive.
  • A $265,597.50 contract with Larry Young Paving for sidewalk improvements along Langford Street.
  • A $680,335.37 contract with Brazos Paving for a new traffic signal at the intersection of Fitch Parkway and Victoria Avenue.
  • A $2.45 million contract with Elliott Construction for the Munson Avenue Rehabilitation Project.
  • A lease with the Brazos Valley Solid Waste Management Agency for the use of the Twin Oaks Law Enforcement Training Facility by the Police Department.
  • A $250,694 contract with Layne Christensen Company to repair the pumps in Wells 6 and 8.
  • A utility agreement with the Brazos County Municipal Utility District No. 1 board addressing the provision of water and sewer service to the district.
  • The appointment of the Aggieland Humane Society’s executive director as the local rabies control authority.

7:49 p.m.

Wellborn Settlement Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted 6-0 to approve a request to change the zoning from Rural to Planned Development District for about 26 acres between Wellborn Road and Royder Road near Greens Prairie Road West. 

The change will allow the development of clustered single-family residences.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation received by the council:

7:51 p.m.

150 Graham Rd. Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted 6-0 to approve a request to change the zoning from Light Industrial and Heavy Industrial to Suburban Commercial for a 1/2-acre at 150 Graham Rd.

The change will allow the development of a daycare facility and retail/office space.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation received by the council:

7:55 p.m.

Agreement with MUD No. 1

After a public hearing, the council voted 6-0 to approve a strategic partnership agreement with Brazos County Municipal Utility District (MUD) No. 1 that outlines the terms and conditions for annexing the area.

The city council created the district in 2014 for the Texas World Speedway property.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation received by the council:

7:57 p.m.

Easement Abandonment at 105 Holik St.

After a public hearing, the council voted 6-0 to abandon a public utility easement at 105 Holik St. to accommodate a building expansion on CSISD property.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation received by the council:

8:03 p.m.

Jane, Eisenhower Parking Removal

After a public hearing, the council voted 6-0 to approve an ordinance removing parking on both sides of Jane Street and Eisenhower Street between University Drive and Cooner Street.

The change was made to allow emergency vehicle access to the proposed Embassy Suites development.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation received by the council:

8:05 p.m.

Northgate Park Parking Removal

After a public hearing, the council voted 6-0 to approve an ordinance removing parking on part of Boyett Street to allow fire department access to the proposed Northgate Park Apartments development.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation received by the council:

8:25 p.m.

Certificates of Obligation 

The council voted 6-0 to authorize the issuance of up to $30.5 million in Certificates of Obligation (Series 2016) to provide resources for streets, police station design and initial project costs, information technology, electric and water improvements, and debt issuance costs.

This debt issue will not affect property tax rate or utility rates.

General Obligation and Refunding Bonds

The council voted 6-0 to authorize the issuance and sale of up to $56 million in General Obligation Improvement and Refunding Bonds (Series 2016) to achieve savings due to lower interest rates.

The refunding is estimated to reduce the overall cost of the bonds by at least 12.618304 percent over their remaining life, saving at least $3.96 million. The savings will help the city by providing an additional margin council may choose to use for projects not currently funded.

The refunding will not impact the property tax rate.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation received by the council:

8:25 p.m.

The mayor adjourned the meeting. The council meets again on Thursday, May 26.


Colin KillianAbout the Author

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian)has been with the City of College Station since 2010. He previously served 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


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Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (March 31)

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, March 31. It’s not the official minutes.

The meeting is being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and streamed online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

6:16 p.m.

The workshop has started. Councilman James Benham is absent tonight.

6:20 p.m.

Executive Session Actions

The council unanimously authorized City Manager Kelly Templin to negotiate a reasonable and favorable settlement in a pole attachment collection matter. The council also unanimously approved and ratified the terms of a settlement agreement with Embrace Brazos Valley.

6:26 p.m. (more…)


Live Blog: Monday’s city council meetings (Sept. 21)

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s regular meeting on Monday, Sept. 21. It’s not the official minutes.

The meeting is being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and streamed online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

Originally scheduled for Thursday, the meeting was moved to allow the council and staff to attend the Texas Municipal League Conference later this week. We won’t have a workshop today.

3:01 p.m.

The meeting has started. Councilman James Benham is absent.

3:04 p.m.

Constitution Week

Mayor Nancy Berry proclaimed this week as Constitution Week with a presentation to the Daughters of the American RevolutionPictured with Mayor Berry (below) are representatives of the La Villita Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolutionare (l-r): Mary Elizabeth Dresser, Laura Harding, Faye Hartfiel, Leonora Owre and Tammy Tiner. (more…)


Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Sept. 10)

By Colin Killian, Communications Manager

gavel[1]Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Sept. 10. It’s not the official minutes.

Both meetings are being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and streamed online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

6:06 p.m.

The workshop has started.

6:46 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled these consent items for workshop discussion: (more…)


Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Aug. 13)

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Aug. 13.

Both meetings are being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and streamed online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website. This blog is not the official minutes.

5:14 p.m.

The workshop has started. Councilman James Benham is out-of-town but is joining the meeting by teleconference.

5:21 p.m. (more…)


Five things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

College Station City Council

By Colin Killian, Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (5 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch: (more…)


Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (April 23)

gavel[1]This is a live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, April 23. It’s not the official minutes.

Both meetings are being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and can also be watched online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:56 p.m.

The workshop meeting has started.

6:10 p.m. (more…)


Five things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

College Station City Council

gavel[1]By Colin Killian, Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (5:30 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:  

  1. Economic Development Master Plan Funding: In the workshop, the council will discuss potential funding mechanisms for implementing the city’s Economic Development Master Plan, which was adopted in 2013.
  2. Mobile Food Vending Park: The council will hear a workshop presentation on establishing permanent mobile food vending sites, including a summary of how food truck parks are regulated in other cities.
  3. Parking Removal on Glade and Southwood: As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider removing parking on both sides of Glade Street and Southwood Drive within 300 feet of Southwest Parkway. Area residents are concerned about vehicles parking too close to the signalized intersections.
  4. Northgate High-Density Dwelling Unit: After a public hearing, the council will consider allowing a maximum of six unrelated individuals to reside together in a high-density dwelling unit in Northgate. The amendment would allow developers to offer a greater variety of unit types in Northgate, where high-density residential development is desired.
  5. B-CS CVB Update: The council will hear an update on the B-CS Convention and Visitors Bureau and its activities, including rebranding efforts, Hotel Occupancy Tax grants, and the preferred access agreement with Texas A&M.

(more…)


Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (April 9)

gavel[1]This is a live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, April 9. It’s not the official minutes.

Both meetings are being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and can also be watched online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

6:06 p.m.

The workshop has started. Councilman James Benham is out-of-town but is participating by videoconference.

6:00 p.m. (more…)


Five things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

gavel[1]By Colin Killian, Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (5:30 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:

  1. Brazos County Vote Centers: After a workshop presentation, the council will consider a resolution on the consent agenda to support Brazos County’s application to the state to establish 25 Election Day vote centers in place of precinct polling places. A pilot program in several Texas cities has resulted in lower costs and more convenient options for voters.
  2. Mass and Public Transit Operations: The council will hear a workshop update from Texas A&M Transportation Services and the Brazos Transit District on local mass and public transit operations.
  3. Rezoning near FM2818 and SH6: After a public hearing, the council will consider changing the zoning district boundaries from General Suburban to General Commercial and Natural Areas Protected for about 39 acres northwest of the FM2818 and State Highway 6 intersection to allow for development.
  4. Parking Restrictions on Cherry Street: After a public hearing, the council will consider removing parking on the south side of the 300 block of Cherry Street to allow aerial fire apparatus access to a proposed apartment development.
  5. Annexation Ordinance: After a public hearing, the council will consider annexing about 233 acres generally bordered by Royder Road, Wellborn Road and Greens Prairie Trail. Two additional public hearings were conducted in March. The annexation service plan can be found on pages 89-98 of the regular meeting packet.

(more…)