Posts tagged “senior programs

Reopening of city’s senior programs delayed

By Kelli Nesbitt, Parks & Recreation Marketing Coordinator

The recent rise in local COVID-19 cases has led the Parks and Recreation Department to delay the reopening of senior programs at the Lincoln Recreation Center and Meyer Senior and Community Center. Limited programs had been scheduled to resume on Jan. 19.

As we’ve been making plans to reopen spaces, facilities, and programs, we’ve understood the harsh reality that phased re-openings aren’t an immediate return to normal operations. They include tough decisions and necessary and appropriate measures to reduce the risks of community transmission.

These considerations don’t mean senior programming won’t return in the spring. We’ll re-evaluate the program every two weeks starting on Jan. 25. We’re also thinking about more outdoor programming to keep our senior demographic socially engaged and moving. 

We recognize the essential role we play in our community’s quality of life, especially during these challenging times. We are faithfully working to create healthier, happier, and more connected communities while responsibly addressing the COVID-19 outbreak. 

We encourage you to get outside and enjoy one of the 54 developed parks with fun-filled amenities near you. We’d love to see and hear ways you are using the outdoors to change your outlook during the pandemic.

For more information, contact us at 979-764-3486 or parks@cstx.gov.

 


About the Blogger Kelli Nesbitt (@kneztalk) has served the Parks & Recreation Department for 15 years, the last eight as marketing coordinator. A native of Bryan, Kelli earned a bachelor’s degree in health & kinesiology from Sam Houston State.


 

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Senior programs return Jan. 19 on limited basis

UPDATE (1/14/21): The recent rise in local COVID-19 cases has led the Parks and Recreation Department to delay the reopening of senior programs. We’ll re-evaluate the program every two weeks. 

By Katy Peterson, Senior Services Coordinator

The Parks and Recreation Department is delighted to start 2021 by welcoming senior adults (ages 55+) back to our facilities. The staff has worked diligently on a smooth return to our programs in the safest possible way.  

The Meyer Senior and Community Center and Lincoln Recreation Center open for limited programming on Tuesday, Jan. 19. Class sizes are limited to 10 and require advance registration. Programs include shading with colored pencils, Foreversize, line dancing, bingo, movie club, computer club, and basic jewelry making.

Members can rest assured that the Parks and Recreation Department follows CDC and local COVID-19 guidelines. Members must:

  • Follow facility policies regarding behavior, hygiene, health practices, social distancing, and CDC recommendations. 
  • Wear a mask at all times, except when eating or drinking.
  • Register for programs and pass a wellness screening that includes a verbal questionnaire and temperature check when entering the facility.
  • Enter the facility no more than 15 minutes before the scheduled class. When your class is completed, exit the building within five minutes to allow the staff time to sanitize appropriately and prepare for the next session.  
  • Bring their coffee, drinks, and snacks. Refreshments aren’t provided.

The changes will take getting used to, but we’re all looking forward to our new normal while welcoming old and new faces into our programs.

To learn more about our senior programs and protocols, visit cstx.gov/Seniors or call 979-764-6371.

 

Katy Peterson is in her eighth year with the Parks and Recreation Department. She previously served as the tourism and educational sales manager at Moody Gardens in Galveston. She also worked for The Texas A&M University System Offices, Treasury Services, and Department of Risk Management under Chancellor Robert McTeer for several years.


 

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Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Jan. 25)

(L-R): Bob Brick, Linda Harvell, Jerome Rektorik, Karl Mooney (mayor), John Nichols, Barry Moore, James Benham.

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Jan. 25. It’s not the official minutes.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink channel 19 or online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:03 p.m.

The workshop has started. No action was taken out of executive session.

5:21 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled these consent items for workshop discussion:

  • Annexation Plan: The proposed ordinance directs staff to prepare a service plan for the area west of College Station identified for annexation. The service plan will contain the details related to the provision of specific municipal services to the property upon annexation and must be complete and available for public inspection before the public hearings. The ordinance also establishes the two required public hearings: March 19 at 6 p.m. and March 22 at 6 p.m., both at city hall. A fiscal impact analysis will be performed as part of the annexation process. 
  • Water Oversize Participation: The city is requesting construction of an 18-inch water transmission line associated with the development of the Brazos Valley Auto Complex. The developer’s engineer demonstrated that a 12-inch water line was adequate for the proposed development. The agreement covers the difference in cost between the 12-inch water line and the 18-inch water line along State Highway 6 South. A total of $149,805.60 is recommended for this project from the Water Capital Improvement Projects Fund.
  • Pershing Point Parking Removal: The proposed ordinance removes on-street parking on the north side of Hayes Lane from the intersection with Towers Parkway west to Papa Bear Drive, on both sides of Regiment Way, and on the north and west sides of Papa Bear Drive from the intersection with Towers Parkway and extending west and south to 120 feet southwest of the intersection with Hayes Lane. The developer of the Pershing Pointe Villas subdivision chose to construct a standard-width residential street and remove some on-street parking to comply with the Unified Development Ordinance. No parking signs were installed when the roads were built. 
  • Summit Crossing Parking Removal: The proposed ordinance removes on-street parking on the north side of Alamosa Street between Summit Crossing Lane and Dakota Lane, on the south side of Buena Vista between Summit Crossing Lane and Dakota Lane, on the east side of Dakota Lane between Alamosa Street and Buena Vista, and on both sides of the public alley between Alamosa Street and Buena Vista. The developer of the Summit Crossing subdivision chose to construct a standard-width residential street and remove some on-street parking to comply with the Unified Development Ordinance.No parking signs were installed when the roads were built. 
  • Holleman South Widening: The $9.44 million project will reconstruct Holleman from North Dowling to Rock Prairie Road West. Improvements include replacing the two-lane asphalt pavement with a four-lane concrete section, a median/center turn lane, curbs, gutters an underground storm sewer, a sidewalk on the west side, and a multi-use path on the east side. The project also includes the installation of a traffic signal at Rock Prairie West and the new elementary school entrance, as well as illumination along the corridor.

5:38 p.m.

Historic Preservation Committee

The council reviewed the Historic Preservation Committee’s annual report.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

5:42 p.m.

Procurement Card Program Audit

The council received the results of an audit of the city’s procurement card program, which found the city is mitigating risk, encouraging the efficient and effective use of procurement cards, and achieving the program’s objectives. The report said some controls could be strengthened to further reduce risk. For the full document, go to pages 7-23 in tonight’s workshop packet.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:47 p.m.

Neighborhood Conservation Overlay Districts

The council discussed providing additional flexibility in single-family Neighborhood Conservation Overlay districts.

Overlay districts are designed to provide additional standards for new construction and redevelopment in established neighborhoods to promote development that is compatible with the neighborhood’s existing character. A primary goal is to balance the need for the renewal of vacant or underused properties.

Planning and Development Services Staff is working with the Southside neighborhood on an application to form an NCO District for the College Park, Oakwood, and Dulaney neighborhoods. The neighborhoods feel the Unified Development Ordinance language governing NCO options are overly restrictive and rigid and asked for additional flexibility to allow more customization to better target neighborhood issues without overregulating other areas.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:56 p.m.

Arts Council Building Renovation

The council discussed the renovation of the Arts Council building on Colgate Drive and its use as a community center that emphasizes senior programming. The $973,000 project includes reconfiguring the layout to better accommodate community activities, addressing ADA issues, and replacing the HVAC.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:56 p.m.

Mayor Mooney suspended the workshop until after the regular meeting, which will begin after a short break.

7:07 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

7:13 p.m.

Historical Marker Presentations

Two historic markers were presented by College Station’s Historic Preservation Committee.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

Plaque No. 92 will be placed on the home at 700 Thomas, which is owned by Jim and Stephanie Russ. This home, built in 1953, is the former residence of Dr. O.D. Butler and his family. The late Dr. Butler was a legendary figure in the history of Texas A&M through his leadership in agriculture. The Russes are pictured with Mayor Mooney and HPC Chairman Lou Hodges.

Plaque No. 93 will be placed on the home at 601 Montclair, which is owned by Jeff and Brenda Hood. This home — likely built by members of Texas A&M’s Corps of Cadets in 1910 or 1911 — is among the original faculty homes to have been moved from campus into a nearby neighborhood. Pictured below with Mayor Mooney and Chairman  Hodges is resident Paul Dutton.

7:16 p.m.

Hear Visitors

One person spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens might address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda.

  • Councilman James Benham recognized Army Sgt. Glenn D. Hicks, Jr. as part of the Fallen Heroes Memorial program. The 24-year-old College Station native died April 28, 2007, when he was struck with an improvised explosive device and small arms fire during combat operations in Salman Park, Iraq.

7:17 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • A $560,900 contract to JaCody Construction to purchase and replace screw lift pumps at the Carters Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant.
  • A change order decreasing by $52,182 a contract with McDonald Municipal & Industrial. The new contract total is $1,074,287.
  • The second reading of a franchise agreement with Brazos Valley Recycling for the collection of recyclables from commercial businesses and multi-family locations.
  • Annual tire purchases and retread services not to exceed $230,000 from Southern Tire Mart through the BuyBoard Purchasing Cooperative.
  • An annual blanket purchase order not to exceed $120,000 with Siddons-Martin Emergency Group for repair parts and labor for fire trucks through the BuyBoard Purchasing Cooperative.
  • An ordinance directing staff to prepare a service plan and establish public hearing dates and times for the annexation of about 65 acres on the city’s west side.
  • A $149,805.60 oversize participation agreement with Bkck Ltd. for a new water main along State Highway 6 South near its intersection with Sebesta Road.
  • Removed parking on the north side of Hayes Lane from the intersection with Towers Parkway west to Papa Bear Drive, on both sides of Regiment Way, and on the north and west sides of Papa Bear Drive from the intersection with Towers Parkway extending west and south to 120 feet southwest of the intersection with Hayes Lane.
  • Removed parking on the north side of Alamosa Street between Summit Crossing Lane and Dakota Lane, on the south side of Buena Vista between Summit Crossing Lane and Dakota Lane, on the east side of Dakota Lane between Alamosa Street and Buena Vista, and on both sides of the public alley between Alamosa Street and Buena Vista.
  • A $9.44 million contract with Larry Young Paving for the construction of the Holleman Drive South Widening Project.
  • A resolution for the Strong and Sustainable Grant Program that repeals a previous resolution and delegates authority to the city manager to administer and implement the program policy.

7:45 p.m.

Rezoning in 200 Block of Holleman

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the zoning district boundaries to Planned Development District for about 5.6 acres in the 200 block of Holleman Drive in the Pooh’s Park Subdivision. The change will allow the development of 62 detached townhouses designed for students.

Here are the PowerPoint presentations:

8:44 p.m.

Land Use at Rock Prairie and Fitch

After a public hearing, the council voted 5-2 to deny a request to change the land use designation to General Commercial and Natural Areas Reserved for about 35 acres north of the intersection of Rock Prairie Road and William D. Fitch Parkway. Councilmen Jerome Rektoik and Barry Moore voted against the motion.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

9:56 p.m.

Rezoning on Greens Prairie Road West

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the zoning district boundaries to Planned Development District for about eight acres at 3596 Greens Prairie Road West. The change will allow the development of senior assisted-living housing that looks similar to nearby homes.

Here are the PowerPoint presentations:

9:57 p.m.

Parks & Recreation Board Appointment

The council voted unanimously to reappoint Ann Hays to another term on the Parks & Recreation Board.

9:59 p.m.

The council discussed and reviewed future agenda items.

9:59 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the regular meeting and will resume the workshop.

10:00 p.m.

The council discussed its calendar and received committee reports.

10:00 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the workshop. The council meets again on Thursday, Feb. 8.

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (5 p.m.) and regular (6 p.m.) meetings.

Here are five items to watch:

  1. Neighborhood Conservation Overlay Districts: In the workshop, the council will discuss additional flexibility for the single-family Neighborhood Conservation Overlay District. The proposed changes would allow more customization to better target neighborhood issues without overregulating other areas.
  2. Arts Council Building Renovation: The council will hear a workshop presentation about plans to renovate the city-owned Arts Council Building on Colgate Drive into a community center that emphasizes senior programs.
  3. Holleman Drive South Widening: As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider a $9.44 million contract for the Holleman South Widening Project, which will reconstruct the road from North Dowling Road to Rock Prairie Road West. The project  ̶  identified as a priority by a citizen advisory committee  ̶  includes a four-lane concrete roadway, a median and center turn lane, a sidewalk on the west side, and a multi-use path on the east side.
  4. Holleman Drive East Rezoning: After a public hearing in the regular meeting, the council will consider a request to rezone about 5½ acres in the 200 block of Holleman Drive East to allow for the development of 62 detached townhouses designed for students.
  5. Greens Prairie Road Rezoning: After another public hearing, the council will consider a request to rezone about 8 acres at 3596 Greens Prairie Road West to allow for the development of senior assisted-living housing that looks similar to nearby homes.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Channels 19 or online. We’ll post a detailed live blog on this site.

Related Links:                                                                 

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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A tribute to the noble legacy of the late Bob Meyer

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By Kelly Kelbly, Recreation Manager

When I worked at the Southwood Community Center, Robert “Bob” Meyer would join me every morning for a cup of coffee.

As time went on, I found myself arriving just a little earlier to greet Mr. Meyer. I came to cherish his perspective and insight as I went about my daily routine. In parks and recreation, we convince ourselves we’re here to make a difference in your life when, in reality, it often turns out the other way.

When Mr. Meyer passed away in 2013 at the age of 81, he left about $750,000 to benefit senior programs in the Parks & Recreation Department. On Tuesday, we dedicated a plaque at Southwood honoring the memory of Mr. Meyer and his lovely wife, Wanda.

Mr. Meyer was a loyal member of Southwood. He served on our Senior Advisory Committee, participated in many of our programs and activities, and volunteered each year assisting head start kids at Pool Trout Fish Out. He and Wanda never had children, and after Wanda passed away, Bob adopted the staff and other members of Southwood as his family.

As it turns out, Mr. Meyer did not just impact me. His presence was felt by many of our seniors as well. The beauty of who he was isn’t that he was a great man who accomplished great things. The simplicity is what makes him truly special. He was a simple and good man who served others.

Thank you, Mr. Meyer, for being a bright spot in our world.

Related Blog

 


kkbioAbout the Author

Kelly Kelbly is in her 15th year with the College Station Parks & Recreation Department. A native of Gilmer, Kelly is a 1998 graduate of Texas A&M.


 

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Aggie brings Food Safety 101 tour to College Station

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By Kristina Beaugh, USDA Public Affairs Specialist

Did you know about 1 in 6 Americans get sick from food poisoning every year? Infections from foodborne pathogens can lead to diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, upset stomach, fever, and dehydration.

Older adults can be more susceptible to foodborne sicknesses and related illnesses, which can have serious complications. For example, our stomachs may not produce enough acid to reduce the number of bacteria in our intestinal tract, resulting in infection.

The USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service is hosting a free Food Safety 101 for Older Adults program at nine senior centers across the country, including a stop in College Station on Wednesday, June 8 at 10 a.m. at the Southwood Community Center.

Developed with the National Council on Aging, the program aims to educate older adults about the basics of food safety and to encourage them to follow the steps needed to prevent foodborne illness in their homes. Though food safety is important all year long, Food Safety 101 for Older Adults focuses on the summer. Bacteria grow faster in warm weather, so extra steps need to be taken to prevent food poisoning.

As a former student at Texas A&M (Class of ’14), I’m delighted to bring the food safety tour to College Station. Leading our presentation will be USDA Deputy Undersecretary for Food Safety Alfred V. Almanza.

Join us to learn some great food safety information just in time for summer. We’ll serve light refreshments, and you could go home with a new digital food thermometer!


Kristina BeaughAbout the Author

Kristina Beaugh (@kebeaugh) is a Public Affairs Specialist for the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service. Originally from New Orleans, she graduated from the Louisiana-Lafayette in 2011 with a bachelor’s degree in microbiology and from Texas A&M in 2014 with a master’s in health promotion and community health sciences. While attending A&M, Kristina worked for the College Station Parks and Recreation Department as facility and event supervisor at Southwood Community Center.


 

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Photo Copyright: brookefuller/123RF Stock Photo