Posts tagged “streets

Concrete streets will save city money in long run

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By Donald Harmon, Public Works Director

The results of last year’s citizen survey made it clear that maintaining our roadways are among our residents’ top concerns. It’s a priority for the Public Works Department, too.

The poor soils in our area contain highly expansive clays that make proper road construction and maintenance a formidable challenge. A proactive preventive maintenance program and responsible construction standards are essential to extending pavement life and substantially reducing the need for expensive maintenance.

In November, the College Station City Council directed the city to move from asphalt to concrete when building new residential and collector streets. A year-long review found that while initial construction costs for concrete were higher, maintenance and life-cycle costs were lower. Over time, that means concrete provides the best value.

As part of our thorough review, we met extensively with industry experts and area contractors along with representatives of the Greater Brazos Valley Builders Association, the Texas A&M Transportation Institute and the City of Bryan. Depending on variables such as lot size, roadway width — and if a collector street is involved — the study suggested a cost increase of about $1,400 per lot.

New development builds the majority of our residential and collector streets, and the new standards are without question a substantial expense. The trade-off is that the reduced maintenance costs mean more resources will be available to maintain our 773 lane miles of existing streets.

Our current street inventory includes 645 lane miles of asphalt and only 128 lane miles of concrete, and more than half of our streets are residential as illustrated in the following graphic. Collectors are streets like Victoria Avenue, while Barron Road is an example of an arterial:

streets8

The study showed that over the 30-year lifecycle of a typical residential street, using concrete would reduce maintenance costs by about 63 percent. Even when you factor in the higher initial cost of construction, concrete residential streets are about 20 percent cheaper in the long run.

Over three decades, that adds up to millions of dollars in savings.

What else are we doing?

We’re always looking for advances in materials and technology to address street maintenance concerns. For example, we’re evaluating a new product that’s designed to more effectively seal asphalt pavement from water infiltration, which is one of the leading causes of pavement failure. The initial results of a pilot study look promising.

In addition, a consulting firm will update the pavement condition index for all city streets this spring as part of our ongoing asset management program. Accurate information is critical in determining where to allocate resources to more efficiently maintain our entire roadway network.

We agree that proper street maintenance is essential. That’s why we’re taking responsible steps to improve the quality of our roads now that will benefit the city and its residents for generations to come.

 


donaldharmon_webAbout the Author

Donald Harmon is in his 18th year with the City of College Station and his fourth as director of public works.


 

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New fee will help address street maintenance concerns

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By Aubrey Nettles, Special Projects Coordinator

While the results of our 2016 citizen survey last spring were enlightening, they were hardly surprising.

We weren’t at all surprised to learn that the overwhelming majority of our residents think College Station is a terrific place to live, work, and raise a family. We were proud that our overall city services got high marks, along with the value of the services you receive for your tax dollars.

When it came to what services our residents deem most important, we weren’t surprised, either. Public safety, managing traffic congestion, and maintaining our roadways and were at the top of the list.

The survey also revealed the biggest gaps between the importance and quality of our services. With our rapid growth, we weren’t surprised to see a 70-point gap between the importance (98 percent) and quality (28 percent) for managing traffic congestion.

What seized our attention was the 51-point gap for street maintenance. While 99 percent said maintaining our roads was an important service, only 48 percent gave us a good or excellent rating. That represented a 23-point drop from the 2012 survey, the biggest decline in any city service.

City council takes action

Those numbers also commanded the attention of the city council. During the FY17 budget process, the council began considering roadway maintenance fees to help address the maintenance needs of that vital infrastructure. After two public hearings and much deliberation over several months, the council voted in November to implement the fees starting Jan. 1.

The roadway maintenance fee will be paid by citizens and businesses within the city limits, based on their reasonably equitable share in the total impact on the road system. The fee will appear as a line item on your utility bill, with the revenue dedicated entirely to the maintenance and rehabilitation of our streets. That means the funds can’t be used for anything else.

Many cities in Texas are facing the same issue of road maintenance needs outpacing property and sales tax revenue. Others with variations of a roadway maintenance fee include Bryan, Austin, Corpus Christi, Kingsville, Lampasas, Taylor, and Richwood. Our neighbors in Bryan began assessing a transportation fee in 2004 that’s improved the quality of its road system.

How much do I pay?

Travel characteristics of specific land uses were used to develop the fee schedule. For residential properties, a flat monthly rate of $7.78 will be assessed to single-family homes and $6.10 to multi-family units. Bryan residents pay $12 a month.

Non-residential properties will be placed in one of five tiers ranging from $17.23 for properties that generate little road use to $250 for properties that create the most road use. For example, a small office building is expected to cause much less traffic than a large retail business, so it pays a lower fee.


Vehicle Miles Generated/Day Monthly Charge
Non-Residential
Tier I 0 – 23.99 $17.23
Tier II 24.00 – 43.99 $38.71
Tier III 43.99 – 90.99 $74.71
Tier IV 91.00 – 223.99 $152.39
Tier V 224.00 + $250.00
Residential
Single Family Flat fee/dwelling unit $7.78
Multi-Family Flat fee/dwelling unit $6.10

What determines the non-residential tiers?

The tiers for non-residential properties are based on the amount of roadway traffic generated by the land use, the size of the property, and an industry-standard trip generation factor. The 65 land use categories for the roadway fee are consistent with other city transportation initiatives.

The size of each property depends on its land use. For example, office buildings are measured by floor area, gas stations are measured by the number of fueling positions, and hotels are measured by the number of rooms. The trip generation factor for each land use — a function of the number and length of vehicle trips — is determined by the Institute of Transportation Engineers’ Trip Generation Manual.

The amount of the fee based on a final trip value derived from the property size and the trip generation factor.

Our residents made clear in the citizen survey that they expect our streets to be properly maintained and rehabilitated. In the long run, additional resources dedicated to maintenance will save taxpayer money by deferring costly reconstruction projects.

For more information, contact me at 979-764-3423 or anettles@cstx.gov.

 


15171088_10109275789026314_9222973594705679303_n1About the Author

Aubrey Nettles is in her third year as special projects coordinator in the City Manager’s Office. She previously served as executive assistant to the Fort Bend County Commission and was a management analyst for Harris County. A native of Smithville, Aubrey earned a master’s degree in public administration from the University of Houston in 2012 and a bachelor’s degree in communications from Texas A&M in 2010.  


 

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5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (5:30 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:

  1. Impact Fee Update: The council will receive the Impact Fee Advisory Committee’s written comments on proposed water and wastewater impact fees and hear an update on the process for possible implementation. The fees would be assessed on new development to help cover the cost of necessary infrastructure.
  2. Park Repairs: As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider a $638,000 contract for improvements and repairs to several city parks. The work is scheduled to be done this fall and winter.
  3. Gateway Signage: The consent agenda also includes a $151,000 contract for construction of a gateway monument sign to be located at the State Highway 6-University Drive interchange. The sign is scheduled to be in place by next spring.
  4. Nimitz Street Rehabilitation: The council will consider a $450,000 contract for the rehabilitation of Nimitz Street from Lincoln Avenue to Ash Street. The project is scheduled for completion in the spring.
  5. Budget/Tax Rate Public Hearings: The council will conduct public hearings on the proposed $341 million city budget and a two-cent increase in the property tax rate to 47.25 cents per $100 of assessed value. The council will vote on the budget and tax rate at a 3 p.m. meeting on Sept. 22.

The council meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Ch. 19, or online. The website includes an archive of previous meetings. We’ll post a detailed live blog on this site.

Related Links                                                                  

 


Colin KillianAbout the Author

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian)has been with the City of College Station since 2010. He previously served 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (August 25)

2014 Council

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, August 25. It’s not the official minutes.

The meeting is being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and streamed online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:30 p.m.

The workshop has started.

5:39 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled this consent item for workshop discussion:

  • Resealing Concrete Joints on Streets: The $591,000 contract with Scodeller is for the resealing of concrete joints on city streets. The contract includes cleaning, sealant and traffic control, and may be renewed for up to two additional one-year terms.
  • Game Day Traffic Control Agreement: As part of the city’s partnership with the Texas A&M University System and other local agencies, the Texas A&M Transportation Institute and city staff developed a traffic control plan to move traffic efficiently after A&M football games. Funds have been appropriated in the Public Works Street Division budget to cover the cost of traffic control deployment. Staff intends to bid the deployment of the equipment and this ILA will allow A&M to cover up to $57,000 of the annual cost.

6:17 p.m.

Water Conservation Efforts

The council heard a presentation about the city’s water conservation efforts, including rebates, irrigation checkups, water waste reductions, conservation-oriented water rates, reclaimed water, rainwater harvesting and the Brazos Valley WaterSmart network.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:31 p.m.

The mayor adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar, future agenda items, and committee reports. The regular meeting will start at 7 p.m.

7:00 p.m.

The regular meeting has started. Boy Scout Troop 1300 led the Pledge of Allegiance.

Scout

7:05 p.m.

Mayor Nancy Berry presented a plaque to Planning & Development Services Director Lance Simms recognizing his department for receiving the 2016 Certificate of Achievement for Planning Excellence issued by the Texas Chapter of the American Planning Association.

Presentation1

7:08 p.m.

Mayor Berry presented a proclamation recognizing Municipal Court Operations Supervisor Marie Barringer for becoming a certified court manager after her recent graduation from the Court Management Program. The program is sponsored by the Institute for Court Management and the Texas Municipal Courts Education Center. Since 2000, about 500 court professionals from across the United States, Canada, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands have achieved certification.

Presentation2

7:10 p.m.

The council thanked Wayne Beckermann of Texas A&M’s Student Government Association for representing the A&M student body at council meetings over the last year. Beckermann introduced student senators Joseph Hood, Ben DeLeon, and Carter Stratham, and announced that Stratham would be the new student liaison to the council.

7:13 p.m.

Hear Visitors

One person spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens may address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda. Ben Roper recognized Army Spc. Michael G. Karr, Jr., as part of the Fallen Heroes Memorial program. The 23-year-old San Antonio native died March 31, 2004, when an improvised explosive device hit his armored personnel carrier in Habbaniyah, Iraq.

7:13 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • A resolution allowing the mayor to sign a $43,500 advance funding agreement with the Texas Department of Transportation for the city’s cost participation in the reconstruction of the FM 2818 and FM 60 interchange.
  • A resolution setting Sept. 22 (3 p.m.) as a public hearing date regarding possible water and wastewater impact fees.
  • Renewal of an inter-local agreement with the City of Bryan for management of the Larry J. Ringer Library.
  • Bid awards of $114,500 to Wesco Distribution and $10,020 to CAPP, USA for distribution circuit breakers and relays.
  • A change order increasing the contract with BerryDunn by $107,475 for additional project management services and expenses.
  • A $67,410 contract with Stantec Consulting Services for final design and construction phase services for the Carters Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant Blower Replacement Project.
  • A $59,400 contract with DXI Industries for up to 90,000 gallons of sodium hypochlorite solution for the disinfection of the public drinking water supply.
  • Ordered a general and special election on Nov. 8 to elect a mayor and Place 2 city councilmember, and to fill a the final two years of the unexpired term for Place 4 and the final year of the unexpired term for place 3. The ordinance also establishes early voting locations and polling places, and making provisions for conducting the election.
  • A contract not to exceed $591,000 with Scodeller Construction for concrete joint resealing on city streets.
  • A $580,450 contract with Kimley-Horn and Associates for the design and construction phase services for Phase I of the Northeast Trunk Line Project and a preliminary engineering report for the phases 2-4.
  • A five-year Inter-local agreement with Texas A&M to equally share in the traffic control device deployment costs under the Texas A&M Football Postgame Traffic Control Plan. The anticipated annual maximum reimbursement from A&M is $57,000.
  • An $85,043 contract with N-Line Traffic Maintenance for 2016 A&M football game day traffic control implementation.

7:33 p.m.

Science Park Comp Plan Amendment

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the land use designation from Business Park to General Commercial for about 14 acres near The Science Park across Earl Rudder Freeway from Beachy Central Park. The change will allow for commercial development. 

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:42 p.m.

Science Park Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the zoning from Planned Industrial to General Commercial for the same property in the previous item.  

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:51 p.m.

Horseback Court Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the zoning from Rural to Restricted Suburban and Natural Areas Protected for about 13 acres at 2744 Horseback Court. The change will allow for residential development.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:51 p.m.

The mayor adjourned the meeting. The council meets again on Thursday, Sept. 8.


Colin KillianAbout the Author

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010. He previously served 23 years as associate media relations director for Texas A&M Athletics. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

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By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (5:30 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:

  1. Cell Phone Driving Ordinance: In the regular meeting, the council will consider amending the city’s traffic code to prohibit the use of wireless devices such as cell phones while operating motor vehicles or bicycles on public roadways. Exceptions would be using a hands-free device or while the vehicle is stopped.
  2. FY17 Budget Presentation: In the workshop, the council will get its first look at the city’s proposed FY17 budget. As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider calling a public hearing on Sept. 8.
  3. Lincoln Center Expansion Project: As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider a $3.37 million construction contract for the renovation and expansion of the Lincoln Recreation Center. The project, which was approved by voters in 2008, includes a new 15,355-square foot multipurpose facility.
  4. Major Roadway Projects: The council will consider contracts for engineering, survey and design services related to the widening of Rock Prairie Road West and capacity improvements to FM 2818.
  5. Impact Fee Public Hearings: The council will consider setting a public hearing on Sept. 22 regarding possible water and wastewater impact fees. The fees would be imposed on new development to help offset the cost of infrastructure. Update (8/10, 4 p.m.): This item has been removed from Thursday’s agenda.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Ch. 19, or online. The website includes an archive of previous council meetings. We’ll post a detailed live blog on this site.

Related links:                                                                 

 


Colin KillianAbout the Author

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian)has been with the City of College Station since 2010. He previously served 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (July 28)

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, July 28. It’s not the official minutes.

The meeting is being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and streamed online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:40 p.m.

The workshop has started. Place 3 Councilman Karl Mooney is absent tonight. Place 6 Councilman James Benham is participating by teleconference.

6:04 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled these consent items for workshop discussion:

  • Bowell Street: The proposed ordinance would make Boswell Street a one-way a street at all times by removing the time-of-day restriction, which makes it difficult for residents along Boswell to obey the state traffic code. Thirteen parents, residents and property owners attended a public meeting on July 6, and all preferred one-way traffic with zero parking restrictions as opposed to two-way operation with parking restrictions during parent pick-up and drop-off times at South Knoll Elementary School.
  • Roadway Impact Fees: The resolution would set Sept. 8 as the second public hearing date regarding the possible imposition of roadway impact fees on new development. The consensus of the council was to delay the item.

6:57 p.m.

Qualifications for Boards and Commissions

The council discussed ways to expand the candidate pool for appointments to the Bicycle, Pedestrian and Greenways Advisory Board, Design Review Board, and Landmark Commission. These boards have specialized criteria that sometimes makes it difficult to fill vacancies.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

 

7:00 p.m.

The mayor adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar, future agenda items, and committee reports. The regular meeting will start after a short break.

7:10 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

7:16 p.m.

Bryan Rotary Business Performance Awards

The council recognized the 2016 winners of the Bryan Rotary 10 Business Performance Awards, which were presented last month to the area’s 10 fastest-growing, privately owned small businesses. Winners of the Lifetime Business Achievement and Research Valley Commercialization Rising Star awards also were honored. We’ll add a photo here later.

7:18 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The resolutions setting public hearings on Sept. 8 regarding roadway, water and wastewater impact fees was pulled from tonight’s consent agenda and will be revisited at a later date.

The council voted unanimously to approve the rest of the consent agenda:

  • The FY17 Community Development Budget and PY16 Annual Action Plan to be submitted to the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.
  • A $159,200 bid award to Wesco Distribution ($94,260) and Hitachi HVB ($64,940) for electrical substation equipment.
  • An ordinance amendment making Boswell Street a one-way street all the time.
  • A $1.38 million contract with Freese and Nichols for the design and construction phase services for Phases I and II of the Lick Creek Parallel Trunk Line Project.
  • A bid award not to exceed $1.82 million to Knife River ($1.4 million) and Brazos Paving ($427,000) for an annual blanket order for Type D hot mix asphalt for the maintenance of streets.
  • A $326,905 contract with Restocon Corporation for concrete and masonry repairs to the Northgate Parking Garage.
  • An ordinance amendment removing stopping, standing, and parking along Langford Street and Boswell Street near South Knoll Elementary School.
  • An annual water meter contract for a maximum of $463,000 with National Meter & Automation.
  • An $82,291 contract with Smith Pump Company for the rehabilitation of Transfer Pump No. 3.
  • The first renewal of the annual price agreement not to exceed $65,000 with ProSTAR Industries for janitorial supplies.
  • An ordinance authorizing a general and special election on Nov. 8 to elect a mayor and Place 2 city councilmember, and fill a vacancy for the remaining two years of the unexpired term for Place 4 and the remaining one year for Place 3.

The council unanimously approved a motion  by Councilwoman Blanche Brick that the roadway impact fees public hearing be held no later than Nov. 10.

The council also unanimously approved a motion  by Councilwoman Brick that the water and wastewater impact fees public hearing be held no later than Sept. 22.

7:26p.m.

Hear Visitors

Three people spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens may address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda.

  • Ben Roper recognized Marine Pfc. Ricky A. Morris, Jr. as part of the Fallen Heroes Memorial program. The 20-year-old Lubbock native died March 18, 2004, as a result of enemy action in Al Qaim, Iraq.
  • Safia Naqi spoke about the poor maintenance of a private alley that serves residents who live in townhomes north of Southwest Parkway, facing Welsh Avenue and Leona Drive.
  • Dorothy Kirkland also spoke about the alley.

7:35 p.m.

FY16 Budget Amendment No. 2

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve Budget Amendment No. 2, which amends the FY16 budget by $628,873 and includes interdepartmental contingency transfers of $378,266. For items included in the amendment, see pages 187-189 of the regular meeting packet.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

 

7:43 p.m.

5068 Stotzer Parkway Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted 5-0-1 to approve a request to change the zoning district boundaries from Rural to Planned Development District for about six acres at 5068 Raymond Stotzer Parkway to allow for the development of a mixed-use office complex. Councilwoman Julie Schultz recused herself from the vote because of a conflict of interest.

The property is located at the southeast corner of the Stotzer Parkway and HSC Parkway.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

 

7:56 p.m.

Wellborn Zoning Districts

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to amend the city’s Unified Development Ordinance in regard to the creation of the Wellborn Estate, Wellborn Restricted Suburban, and Wellborn Commercial zoning districts under the Wellborn Community Plan.

Adopted in 2009, The Wellborn Community Plan identifies 10 future land use and character designations and calls for the creation of zoning districts that align with the plan’s objectives. The two new residential districts and one new commercial district will only be permitted in the Wellborn Community Plan Area.

The new districts were developed from feedback received from community members along with the Wellborn Community Plan:

  • Wellborn Estate: This designation is generally for areas that, due to public service limitations or a prevailing rural character, should have limited development activity. These areas will tend to consist of low-density single-family residential lots of two acres or more but may be one acre if clustered around undeveloped open space.
  • Wellborn Restricted Suburban: This district is generally for areas that should have a moderate level of development activity. These areas will tend to consist of medium-density single-family residential lots (minimum 20,000 square feet) and may be clustered for reduced lot sizes (minimum 8,000 square feet). When using the cluster option, open space should be provided so density is not increased. Such open space should be in addition to a minimum open space requirement of 15 percent of the developing area.
  • Wellborn Commercial: This district is generally for concentrations of commercial activities that focus primarily on nearby residents. Such uses will be limited in size and not accommodate for drive-thru services. Specific design elements should be incorporated into such developments to limit the visual impact and enhance the community’s defined character.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

 

7:58 p.m.

Wellborn Zoning District Animal Control 

The council voted unanimously to amend the city’s Code of Ordinances to allow domestic livestock, fowl, and rabbits without a permit in the newly-created Wellborn Estate zoning district.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

 

8:01 p.m.

Design Review Board Appointments 

The council voted unanimously for two appointments to the Design Review Board.

8:01 p.m.

The mayor adjourned the meeting. The council meets again on Thursday, August 11.

 


Colin KillianAbout the Author

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian)has been with the City of College Station since 2010. He previously served 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (5:30 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:

  1. Boswell Street Changes: The council will consider consent agenda items to make Boswell Street one-way all the time and to remove stopping standing and parking along Boswell and Langford Street near South Knoll Elementary School.
  2. Lick Creek Trunk Line: The council will consider a $1.38 million contract for the design and construction of a sewer trunk line to serve the Lick Creek sewer shed.
  3. Impact Fees Public Hearings: The council will consider setting Sept. 8 as the second public hearing date regarding the possible imposition of water, wastewater and roadway impact fees on new development.
  4. Special City Council Election: The council will consider authorizing a general election for Nov. 8 to elect a mayor and Place 2 city councilmember, and a special election to fill the remaining two years for Place 4 and one year for Place 3. Place 4 Councilman John Nichols and Place 3 Councilman Karl Mooney are running for mayor and must surrender their current seats in November.
  5. Budget Amendment: The council will consider a $628,873 budget amendment and interdepartmental contingency transfers of $378,266. For items included in the amendment, see pages 187-189 of the regular meeting packet.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Ch. 19, or online. The website includes an archive of previous council meetings. We’ll post a detailed live blog on this site.

Related Links                                                                 


Colin KillianAbout the Author

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian)has been with the City of College Station since 2010. He previously served 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (June 9)

5523701_l

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, June 9. It’s not the official minutes.

The meeting is being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and streamed online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

Many of the items on tonight’s agenda were carried over from the scheduled May 26 meeting, which was cancelled because of hazardous weather.

3:35 p.m.

The workshop has started.

4:49 p.m.

Pavement Standards

The council heard a presentation by Public Works Director Donald Harmon about pavement standards for city streets and roads. Harmon said asphalt pavement is cheaper in the short run, but concrete is easier to maintain and could be a more cost-effective option in the long term.

Council asked staff to come back with more information before it makes any decision.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation received by the council:

5:05 p.m.

Wastewater Capital Projects

The council is hearing a presentation from Water Services Director David Coleman about wastewater capital projects that are needed to stay ahead of development in the next decade.

Coleman said as the Wastewater Master Plan and the Impact Fee Study near completion, the picture is becoming clearer for what capital projects are required. He said the city is nearing capacity in its large trunk collection lines and treatment plants, which means a significant annual capital investment is necessary.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation received by the council:

5:05 p.m.

Executive Session

The council has gone into executive session. 

6:03 p.m.

The workshop has resumed.

6:27 p.m.

Joint Meeting with P&Z

The council conducted a joint meeting with the Planning & Zoning Commission to review the commission’s 2016 Plan of Work.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation received by the council:

6:42 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled these consent items for workshop discussion:

  • Public Urination Ordinance: The amendment to the city’s Code of Ordinances would help deter public urination and defecation, especially in the Northgate District.
  • Impact Fee Hearings: The resolutions set public hearings on roadway, water, and wastewater impact fees for the July 14 council meeting.
  • Food Establishment Sanitation: New state regulations render the city’s food establishment ordinances outdated. The amendments would reflect those changes.
  • Employee Health Clinic: The contract with CHI St. Joseph Health would open an exclusive health clinic to provide non-urgent care for city employees, dependents ages 5 and up, and retirees enrolled in the city’s Group Health Insurance Plan.

6:59 p.m.

The mayor adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar, future agenda items, and committee reports. The regular meeting will start after a short break.

7:09 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

7:16 p.m.

Hear Visitors

Two people spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens may address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda. 

  • Frank Duchmasclo provided the council with pictures of a senior center in Caldwell to show what Caldwell is doing for its senior citizens.
  • Ben Roper recognized Army Pfc. Ervin Dervishi as part of the Fallen Heroes Memorial program. The 21-year-old Fort Worth native died Jan. 24, 2004 when a rocket-propelled grenade hit his Bradley Fighting Vehicle in Baji, Iraq.

7:17 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • An ordinance amendment regarding public urination and defecation.
  • A grant application to the governor’s office for hotspot technology.
  • A $177,000 contract with Jones & Carter for the design, bidding, and construction phase services for Phases I and II of the State Highway 6 Waterline Project.
  • A $52,120 contract with Brown, Reynolds, Watford Architects for services related to the design of the traffic operations renovation as part of the ITS Master Plan Implementation project.
  • The $90,980 purchase of 10 traffic signal cabinets from Paradigm Traffic Systems to replace cabinets and provide functionalities with the new Intelligent Transportation System.
  • The Semi-Annual Report on Impact Fees.
  • A contract not to exceed $465,688.60 with CHI St. Joseph Health to provide employee health clinic services and operations management.
  • A negotiated settlement between the Atmos Cities Steering Committee and Atmos Energy Corp. (Mid-Tex Division) regarding the company’s rate review mechanism filings, and a settlement agreement on rate tariffs and proof of revenues.
  • Authorized the city manager to execute documents necessary for submitting the SWAT Night Vision Equipment Grant application for Criminal Justice Division funds from the Office of the Governor.
  • Set a public hearing for Thursday, July 14 at 7 p.m. at College Station City Hall to consider land use assumptions and capital improvement plan for roadway impact fees.
  • Set a public hearing date for Thursday, July 14 at 7 p.m. at College Station City Hall to consider land use assumptions and capital improvement plan for water and wastewater impact fees.
  • An inter-local agreement with Brazos County and the City of Bryan to apply for and accept a Justice Assistance Grant from the U.S. Department of Justice.
  • Renewal of the annual city-wide land surveying services and civil engineering services contracts with Joe Orr and Binkley & Barfield for a total of $100,000.
  • A five-year lease agreement estimated at $198,456 annually with Texas Commercial Waste for refuse containers.
  • A signal interconnect agreement with Union Pacific Railroad to allow the City of College Station to construct, maintain and operate a new signal facility at Greens Prairie Trail’s at-grade road crossing intersection.
  • An $80,000 bid award to GDS Associates for electric NERC compliance consulting services.
  • A $465,457.05 bid award for annual price agreements for various electrical items to be stored in inventory: KBS Electric Distributors ($97,493), Stuart C. Irby ($31,802), Graybar Electric ($55,135.30), Techline, Inc. ($244,126.75), and Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories Inc. ($36,900).
  • A bid award of $94,422 for the purchase of three 145kV potential transformers and three outdoor breakers to be maintained in electrical inventory and expended as needed.
  • A bid award of $290,356.14 for annual price agreements for electric meters and sockets to be stored in inventory: Priester-Mell & Nicholson ($160,891.14), KBS Electrical Distributors ($12,465), and Anixter ($117,000).
  • A resolution amending the authorized representatives on the local government pool account, TexPool.
  • A resolution amending the authorized representatives on the local government pool account, Texas Short Term Asset Reserve.
  • Updated the city’s food establishment ordinances to reflect new state regulations.

7:18 p.m.

Easement Abandonment on Holden Circle

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to abandon a public utility easement at 4928 Holden Circle to allow for development.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation received by the council:

7:59 p.m.

Municipal Utility District Consent

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to grant conditional consent to form up to five municipal utility districts in the City’s Extraterritorial Jurisdiction, generally located along Peach Creek between FM 2154 and State Highway 6 South.

The proposed MUDs will develop, operate, maintain, and issue bonds for financing the construction of needed infrastructure for the districts and levy and assess a tax on property within the districts to pay associated operational and maintenance expenses.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation received by the council:

8:12 p.m.

Crossroads Self Storage Land Use

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the future land use from Restricted Suburban to General Commercial and Suburban Commercial for about nine acres near the intersection of Wellborn Road and Greens Prairie Trail.

Crossroads Self Storage is located on the property, and the amendment generally allows commercial uses that cater to nearby residents and the larger community.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation received by the council:

8:15 p.m.

Crossroads Self Storage Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the zoning from Rural to Planned Development District for about nine acres near the intersection of Wellborn Road and Greens Prairie Trail.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation received by the council:

8:15 p.m.

The mayor adjourned the meeting. The council meets again on Thursday, June 23.


Colin KillianAbout the Author

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian)has been with the City of College Station since 2010. He previously served 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


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5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

UPDATE (5/26/16, 4:30 p.m.) Due to hazardous weather conditions, Thursday’s meetings have been cancelled.

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (about 5:30 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:

  1. Wastewater Capital Improvements: In the workshop, the council will discuss wastewater system capital projects the city needs to stay ahead of development. Our collection lines
    and treatment plants are nearing capacity.
  2. Pavement Standards: The council will hear a presentation on pavement standards for our streets and roads.
  3. Public Urination Ordinance: As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider an amendment to the Code of Ordinances to help deter public urination and defecation.
  4. Highway 6 Waterline Projects: The council will consider a contract for design, bidding and construction phase services for Phase I and II of the State Highway 6 Waterline Project. The lines will serve future development south of Fitch Parkway.
  5. Holleman Drive South Rezoning: After a public hearing, the council will consider a request to rezone about 14 acres south of Cain Road between Holleman Drive and Old Wellborn Road. The change will allow the development of townhomes.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Ch. 19, or online, where you can also find an archive of previous meetings. We’ll post a detailed live blog on this site.

Related links:                                                                 


Colin KillianAbout the Author

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian)has been with the City of College Station since 2010. He previously served 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


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Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Dec. 10)

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Dec. 10. It’s not the official minutes.

The meeting is being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and streamed online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

Before going into executive session this afternoon, the council recognized longtime Development Coordinator Bridgette George as the city’s 2015 employee of the year (pictured below with Mayor Nancy Berry and City Manager Kelly Templin). Coincidentally, George celebrated her 25th anniversary with the city today. 

cs-er-bridgette

6:21 p.m.

The workshop has started.

6:22 p.m.

Amendment to Kalon Therapeutics Agreement

The council took action on one item it discussed in its executive session, unanimously approving an amendment to an economic development agreement with Kalon Therapeutics. The amendment extends the completion of improvements from Dec. 31, 2015, to Dec. 31, 2016, and is contingent on the City of Bryan’s approval.

6:46 p.m. (more…)


5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (about 5:30 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:

  1. Ringer Library Expansion: The council will hear a workshop presentation on the proposed conceptual design of the voted-approved $8.4 million expansion of the Larry J. Ringer Library.
  2. Street Maintenance Audit: The council will discuss the city auditor’s street maintenance report, including recommendations to address the high turnover rate of skilled employees and how to best maintain construction standards.
  3. CSPD Re-Accreditation: During the regular meeting, the council will recognize the Police Department for the re-accreditation of its law enforcement and communications programs.
  4. Police-Related Consent Items: The consent agenda includes several items related to CSPD, including 65 new Tasers, an upgrade for the department’s existing bomb robot, and the replacement of five 2010 motorcycles. A federal grant will pay for the robot upgrade.
  5. Arts Council Building Agreement: The council will consider extending the use agreement with the Arts Council of Brazos Valley regarding the city-owned building at 2275 Dartmouth Dr. The agreement is for a one-year extension with an option for an additional year as the organization continues its plans for a new location.

(more…)


Five things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (5:30 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:

  1. BVSWMA Budget: In the workshop, the council will consider approving the Brazos Valley Solid Waste Management Agency’s (BVSWMA) proposed FY16 budget of $8.85 million.
  2. Northgate Parking Lot Special Events: The council will hear a workshop presentation about the potential use of the Northgate surface parking lot for special events.
  3. Greens Prairie Trail Extension: As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider allowing Brazos County to fund an extension of Greens Prairie Trail from Wellborn Road to the College Station city limit, including a new railroad crossing.
  4. Embassy Suites Rezoning: After a public hearing, the council will consider changing the zoning district boundaries from office and general commercial to planned development district for about 2.4 acres north of University Drive East between Jane and Eisenhower streets. The change will allow for the development of an Embassy Suites hotel.
  5. McCulloch Subdivision Overlay: After a public hearing, the council will consider adding a neighborhood conservation overlay is the area south of Holleman Drive and north of Nevada Street, generally between Welsh Avenue and Oney Hervey Drive. The request is in response to large homes recently constructed in and around the McColloch neighborhood and will provide additional standards for development.

(more…)


Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Aug. 13)

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Aug. 13.

Both meetings are being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and streamed online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website. This blog is not the official minutes.

5:14 p.m.

The workshop has started. Councilman James Benham is out-of-town but is joining the meeting by teleconference.

5:21 p.m. (more…)


Five things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

College Station City Council

By Colin Killian, Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (5 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch: (more…)


Five things to watch at Monday’s city council meetings

gavel[1]By Colin Killian, Communications/Marketing Specialist

The College Station City Council gathers Monday at city hall for its workshop (5:30 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:  

  1. Aggieland Humane Society: The council will hear a workshop report about the Aggieland Humane Society. The council will consider the city’s annual payment of $205,000 in sheltering fees as part of the consent agenda.
  2. Veterans Memorial Funding: The council will consider the budget for the Memorial for all Veterans of the Brazos Valley, along with a $15,000 funding agreement for FY15.
  3. BVGCD Board Appointment: The council will consider appointing Bill Harris to the Brazos Valley Groundwater Conservation District, subject to approval by the Brazos Count Commissioners Court.
  4. Street Rehabilitation Projects: The council will consider contracts with Binkley & Barfield for professional services related to the Graham Road ($144,820) and Munson Avenue ($377,470) rehabilitation projects.
  5. Oil & Gas Permit: After a public hearing, the council will consider approving an oil and gas operations permit to Halcon Operating Company for a second well on a 71-acre tract north of the Holleman Drive South-Cain Road intersection. The council approved the first well on Oct. 9.

(more…)


Five things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

gavel[1]The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (5:30 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:   (more…)


Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Sept. 12)

This is a live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Sept. 12. It’s not the official minutes.

Both meetings are being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and can also be watched online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

6:09 p.m.

The workshop meeting has started.

6:13 p.m.

Mayor Nancy Berry proclaimed September as National Preparedness Month with a presentation to representatives of the Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service.

6:15 p.m.

The mayor proclaimed today as Deb Barton Day with a presentation to Deb Barton, a local bicyclist who won four gold medals at the recent Senior National Games in Cleveland, Ohio.

(more…)


Five things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

gavel[1]Here are five items to watch when the College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (6 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings:   (more…)