Police

How to avoid being a spring break crime victim

By Lt. Steve Brock, CSPD Public Information Officer

Spring break is a time of fun and relaxation for many students. But it can also be a time for criminals to thrive.

Don’t let crime spoil your vacation. You can reduce your chances of being a victim by following these tips to protect your home — and yourself — while you’re away.

Protect Your Home

  • Don’t advertise your plans to strangers or on social media outlets.
  • Make sure your home looks lived in since most burglars want to avoid confrontation.
  • Stop mail and newspaper deliveries or ask a friend or neighbor to make daily collections.
  • Hide empty garbage cans or ask a neighbor to move your container to the curb and bring it in after collection.
  • Leave shades and blinds in normal positions.
  • Put an automatic timer on lights and radios, preferably tuned to talk radio.
  • If possible, have neighbors randomly park their vehicle in your driveway.
  • Leave a key with a trusted neighbor. Don’t hide keys in a mailbox or under a doormat or planter –  or anywhere outside.
  • Store valuables in a safe deposit box or take smaller items with you.
  • Make a record of the serial numbers for your valuable items and take the list with you, store it in your safe deposit box or send it to your personal email account.
  • Engrave your driver’s license number or a unique identifying mark on the back of all electronics and computers.
  • Lock all windows and doors. Double lock windows with inexpensive key locks.
  • Double check garage doors before you leave and unplug or disarm automatic garage door openers if possible.
  • If you’re leaving a vehicle at home, don’t leave your garage door opener in it.
  • Lock gates to fenced back yards.

Protect Yourself

  • Make sure your friends and relatives know where you’re vacationing. Call friends or family members to let them know you’ve arrived and returned safely.
  • If you drink, do it in moderation and make responsible decisions. Follow the alcohol laws at your destination.
  • Have a designated driver or designated sober friend in your group to be sure everyone gets home safely.
  • If a member of your group passes out from alcohol consumption, call 911 immediately.
  • There’s safety in numbers. Try your best to stay around your friends, and never go anywhere alone.
  • Don’t ever allow a friend go off with strangers and never take strangers to your room.
  • Don’t assume that someone you’ve just met will look out for your best interests. Acquaintances sexually assault more people than strangers.
  • Only accept drinks from a licensed bartender or consume drinks you pour yourself. If you don’t know the source of the drink, you risk receiving an altered beverage.
  • Always be aware of your surroundings, know where you’re at, and know how to get back to your hotel.
  • Avoid carrying large amounts of cash or traveler’s checks. Don’t flash your money around or let anyone know how much money you have with you.
  • Don’t be a victim of identity theft. Never allow someone access to your personal identification or credit cards, which should always be kept in your purse or wallet and never left unattended.
  • Be cautious when sharing your personal information or where you are staying.
  • Ensure the safety of your valuables by not bringing them or locking them in a hotel safe. If you don’t have access to a safe, stow your valuables in the trunk of your car or a secure place in your room.
  • Always keep your hotel room door locked. Use the peephole before answering the door, and never open it for someone you don’t know.
  • Finally, trust your instincts. If a situation or your surroundings make you uneasy, you probably sense something. Be watchful and alert.

Have a fun, relaxing – and safe – spring break!

 


About the Author

Lt. Steve Brock has been with the College Station Police Department since 2004.


 

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5 ways to protect your property, stop vehicle break-ins

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Lt. Steve Brock, CSPD Public Information Officer

Since the start of 2017, about 57 percent of the reported vehicle burglaries in College Station have been the result of owners leaving their cars and trucks unlocked.

texas_gun_rights_bumper_sticker-rd873d81da0ec48959af36cea1496add6_v9wht_8byvr_324A recent trend has been for burglars to target trucks displaying stickers or emblems that suggest a firearm could be inside. After breaking a window, they quickly search the interior, especially areas where a firearm could be stored.

Since burglary is a crime of opportunity, prevention is the key. By following these five simple rules, you can make vehicle break-ins less enticing and much more challenging:

  1. Lock your vehicle.
  2. Park in a well-lit area.
  3. Take your valuables with you, hide them in the vehicle, or lock them in the trunk.
  4. Consider removing stickers and emblems that suggest a firearm may be inside.
  5. Consider leaving your gun at home or carry it with you when legal.

By being vigilant and careful, you can help us protect your property and prevent vehicle burglaries.

 


About the Author

Lt. Steve Brock has been with the College Station Police Department since 2004.


 

If you found value in this blog post, please share it with your social network and friends!


Don’t let drunk driving spoil Super Bowl Sunday

By Chuck Fleeger, Assistant Police Chief

Super Bowl Sunday is one of the best days of the year for sports fans, but it’s also one of the most dangerous days of the year on our roads. According to Mothers Against Drunk Driving, about 31 percent of traffic fatalities on a typical day involve a drunk driver. On Super Bowl Sunday, that awful number spikes to 43 percent.

We want to see that tragic figure reduced.

(more…)


Can you openly carry a handgun in College Station?

Since the Texas open carry law becomes effective Friday, The City of College Station has put together this information to clarify how the law will apply in our community:

— Public Communications Office

 


Podcast: What we learned from League City’s new police station

By Jay Socol, Public Communications Director

The College Station City Council will soon decide where they want to locate the city’s next police station. They’ll also have some decisions to make regarding the scale, scope, amenities and, of course, the cost for such an important facility.

In this edition of the podcast, City Manager Kelly Templin discusses a recent road trip several staff and council members took to League City for a thorough tour of that community’s year-old facility. Templin describes what they saw, what they learned, and how the experience contributes to the process of replacing CSPD’s headquarters.

Podcast Archive (more…)


Live Blog: Monday’s city council meetings (Nov. 23)

College Station City Council

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Monday, Nov. 23. It’s not the official minutes.

The meeting is being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and streamed online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

The workshop will start about 5:30 p.m., followed by the regular meeting at 7.

5:40 p.m.

The workshop has started.

Elected Mayor Pro Tem

The council voted unanimously to elect Place-4 Councilman John Nichols for a one-year term as mayor pro tem, which acts as mayor if the mayor is disabled or absent. Nichols replaces Place-1 Councilwoman Blanche Brick in that role.

5:41 p.m. (more…)