Posts tagged “Census

Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Aug. 22)

Sitting (L-R): Mayor Pro Tem Linda Harvell, Mayor Karl Mooney, Eleanor Vessali. Standing (L-R): Bob Brick, Jerome Rektorik, John Nichols, Dennis Maloney.

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Aug. 22. It’s not the official minutes.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink channel 19 or online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:32 p.m.

The workshop has started. The council took no action out of the executive session.

5:33 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. No consent items were pulled for workshop discussion.

5:49 p.m.

Texas Weekend of Remembrance

The council reviewed the 2019 Texas Weekend of Remembrance on Memorial Day weekend and asked staff to come back with options to improve the event. 

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:19 p.m.

2020 U.S. Census

The council received a presentation about the 2020 U.S. Census. A resolution supporting the census is part of tonight’s consent agenda.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:21 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar and received committee reports. The regular meeting will start after a short break.

6:31 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

6:44 p.m.

Hear Visitors

Three people spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens might address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda.

  • Councilwoman Elianor Vessali recognized Army Capt. Blake H. Russell as part of the Fallen Heroes Project. The 35-year-old Fort Worth native died in combat on July 22, 2006, in Baghdad, Iraq.
  • David Higdon complimented city staff for making it easier for residents to get city information, specifically citing the city’s new website.
  • Jorge Sanchez spoke about the American Anti-Corruption Act and in favor of providing a salary for city councilmembers.

6:45 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • A contract not to exceed $888,946.48 with Invoke for implementation of Microsoft Office 365, including training and software licenses.
  • A $321,644.66 annual contract with Utility Restoration Services for padmount equipment repair and restoration.
  • A contract not to exceed $256,750 with TransGard for the purchase, delivery, and installation of animal control fencing at five electric substations.
  • An ordinance amendment relating to gravediggers’ licenses.
  • Renewal of the letter agreement for professional auditing services with BKD for a not-to-exceed amount of $89,390.
  • Renewal of annual blanket orders not to exceed $224,545 for electric meters and sockets: Anixter ($37,952), Priester Mell & Nicholson ($164,363), and Texas Electric Cooperative ($22,230).
  • A resolution supporting the 2020 U.S. Census.

7:15 p.m.

Tax Rate Public Hearing

The council conducted its first public hearing on the city’s proposed FY20 property tax rate of .534618 per $100 of assessed value. The second and final public hearing is Sept. 12. Four people spoke during the public hearing.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:18 p.m.

Strategic Partnership with MUD No. 2

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a strategic partnership agreement with Brazos County Municipal Utility District No. 2 that outlines conditions for district annexation and limited-purpose commercial annexation. No citizens spoke during the public hearing.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:23 p.m.

Elder-Aid Federal Grant Funding

The council voted unanimously to approve $463,000 in federal grant funds for Elder-Aid to purchase and rehabilitate four affordable duplexes for income-eligible seniors at 3312 -3314 Normand and 3337-3339 Longleaf.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:32 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the meeting after the council discussed and reviewed future agenda items.

The council meets again on Thursday, Sept. 12.

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (about 5 p.m.) and regular (6 p.m.) meetings.

Here are five items to watch:

  1. Texas Weekend of Remembrance: In the workshop, the council will review the 2019 Texas Weekend of Remembrance held Memorial Day weekend.
  2. 2020 U.S. Census: The council will hear a workshop presentation about the 2020 U.S. Census. A resolution supporting the census is part of the regular meeting’s consent agenda.
  3. Public Hearing on Proposed Tax Rate: In the regular meeting, the council will conduct the first public hearing on the city’s proposed FY20 property tax rate of .534618 per $100 of assessed value. The second public hearing is Sept. 12.
  4. Strategic Partnership Agreement: The council will conduct the second public hearing on a proposed strategic partnership agreement with Brazos County Municipal Utility District No. 2. The agreement outlines conditions for district annexation and limited-purpose commercial annexation.
  5. Senior Affordable Housing: The council will consider approving $463,000 in federal grant funds for purchase and rehabilitation costs for four affordable duplexes for income-eligible seniors at 3312 -3314 Normand Drive and 3337-3339 Longleaf Circle.

Related Links:                                                                 

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


If you found value in this blog post, please share it with your social network and friends!


		
	

Guess who’s the fastest-growing non-suburb in Texas?

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By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Population estimates released Thursday by the U.S. Census Bureau show that College Station was the 18th fastest-growing city in the country from 2014 to 2015 when our population grew by 4.1 percent.

In that period, the Census says we added 4,253 new residents for a current population of 107,889. Texas cities dominate the list, with seven growing even faster than College Station. Georgetown led the nation with 7.8 percent growth, followed by New Braunfels at 6.6 percent.

College Station is the only non-suburb to rank among the state’s 10 fastest-growing cities.

Here’s the chart:

10 Fastest-Growing Texas Cities (2014-15)

  City (national rank) New
Residents
Growth
Pct.
1. Georgetown (1) 4,611 7.8%
2. New Braunfels (2) 4,339 6.6%
3. Frisco (4) 9,218 6.3%
4. Pearland (7) 5,473 5.3%
5. Pflugerville (11) 2,450 4.5%
6. Allen (16) 3,881 4.1%
7. League City (17) 3,877 4.1%
8. College Station (18) 4,253 4.1%
9. Conroe (19) 2,693 4.1%
10. McKinney (21) 6,000 3.8%

 


Colin KillianAbout the Author

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian)has been with the City of College Station since 2010. He previously served 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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College Station hits the 100,000 mark!

coollogo_com-19224769The City of College Station’s population estimate has finally hit the 100,000 mark! We reached 100,046 in January, based on recently issued Certificates of Occupancy. We’d been within 300 of the milestone since September.

What exactly does this mean?

Before we get into the implications of hitting 100K, allow me to describe how I develop the population estimate each month and to explain the difference between inhabitants and population.

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99,093 … and counting!

8281792407_b5c763fcdd_b[1]College Station’s countdown to 100,000 continues.

Based on recently issued residential certificates of occupancy, the city’s Planning & Development Services department on Thursday announced July’s population estimate of:

99,093

The estimate has risen by almost 1,000 in the last two months, and we’ve almost doubled our 1990 census count of 52,456.

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What happens when College Station hits 100,000?

I’ve written before about my fascination with milestone numbers.  My latest fixation — shared by plenty of my coworkers — is on this little beauty: 100,000. I’m referring to College Station’s population, which is currently just shy of this mark.

100,000: When will we get there?

The safe answer is that we’ll get there soon. The 2010 Census showed College Station to be at 93,857. Believe it or not, just prior to the release of that figure, the population estimate calculated by our Planning & Development Services Office was 93,806 — a difference of only 51 and an astounding display of accuracy.

Here’s a little insight into how they track the numbers:

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