Posts tagged “Historic Preservation Committee

Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (March 28)

Sitting (L-R): Mayor Pro Tem Linda Harvell, Mayor Karl Mooney, Eleanor Vessali. Standing (L-R): Bob Brick, Jerome Rektorik, John Nichols, Dennis Maloney.

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, March 28. It’s not the official minutes.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink channel 19 or online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:11 p.m.

The workshop has started. The council took no action out of the executive session. 

5:23 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled these consent items for workshop discussion:

  • Funding Agreement With TxDOT: In 2018, the city entered into an advanced funding agreement with TxDOT for the construction of intersection improvements Wellborn Road and Deacon Drive. TxDOT has since updated the required resolution language and is requiring that the city adopt the revised resolution. The agreement covers work needed within state right-of-way as part of the Cain/Deacon railroad crossing switch project.
  • Wellborn Special Utility District Agreement: The widening and realignment of Royder require the relocation of Wellborn SUD waterlines. To reduce costs and make sure the relocations are completed on the road project schedule, the city will complete the relocations. Wellborn SUD will reimburse the city for the portion of waterline within the state’s right-of-way.
  • Police Body Cameras: The five-year obligation of $147,287 adds 17 Axon body cameras and 14 flex cameras to outfit detectives in the Criminal Investigations Division and members of the SWAT team.

5:43 p.m.

Historic Preservation Committee Annual Report

The council reviewed the annual report from the Historic Preservation Committee.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

 

5:51 p.m.

Secondhand Dealer Ordinance

The council reviewed a proposed ordinance that would strengthen the consistency of recordkeeping among secondhand dealers, which is defined as those who buy used personal property for resale or lend money on the security of personal property. It includes crafted precious metal dealers and pawnbrokers.

Police say the ordinance will increase the likelihood of intercepting stolen property.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

 

6:55 p.m.

NCO Recommendations

The council reviewed recommendations related to the Neighborhood Conservation Overlay zoning district and its associated standards and processes. Since last summer, the council has received additional information related to neighborhood conservation ordinances in Bryan, and the Heart of Southside NCO process has ended.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

 

6:57 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar and received committee reports. The regular meeting will start after a short break.

7:05 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

7:11 p.m.

Mayor’s Water Conservation Challenge

Mayor Mooney proclaimed the Mayor’s Challenge for Water Conservation throughout April. The eighth annual National Mayor’s Challenge for Water Conservation is designed to inspire residents to make online pledges to reduce their environmental impact and to reap the savings on their water, sanitation, and electricity bills.

7:15 p.m.

National Public Health Week

Mayor Mooney proclaimed next week as National Public Health Week, which has been promoted since 1995 by the American Public Health Association to educate the public, policymakers and public health professionals about issues important to improving public health.

7:24 p.m.

CSFD Class 1 ISO Designation

Representatives from the Insurance Services Office (ISO) and the Texas Fire Marshal’s Office officially presented the College Station Fire Department with its Class 1 ISO rating. Most U.S. property insurers use ISO’s Public Protection Classification program to calculate premiums, which are generally lower in communities with a high rating.

Fewer than one percent of the 47,500 fire protection areas in the United States have a Class 1 ISO rating.

Related Blog: CSFD joins elite company with Class 1 ISO rating

7:30 p.m.

Hear Visitors

One person spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens might address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda.

  • Councilwoman Elianor Vessali recognized 2nd Lt. Johnny K. Craver as part of the Fallen Heroes Project. The 37-year-old McKinney native died on Oct. 13, 2006, when an improvised explosive device detonated near his vehicle in Baghdad, Iraq.

7:31 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • Established a 35 mph speed limit on new sections of Lakeway Drive and Pebble Creek Parkway.
  • Added a school zone along Graham Road, Longmire Drive, and Birmingham Road near International Leadership Texas.
  • Repealed an old resolution and adopted a new one regarding an advanced funding agreement with the state for intersection improvements at Wellborn Road and Deacon Drive that are part of the Cain/Deacon railroad crossing switch project.
  • An inter-local agreement with the Wellborn Special Utility District for its cost participation in the city’s Royder Road Phase II Widening Project.
  • A $340,000 contract with Bayer Construction for a traffic signal at the intersection of Texas Avenue and Brothers Boulevard.
  • A third change order increasing the master services and purchasing agreement with Axon Enterprise from $1.17 million to $1.3 million for the purchase, support, warranty, and video data storage of police body cameras and in-car video systems.
  • An amendment permitting the two appointed citizen members of the Audit Committee to vote on matters before the committee.
  • Terminated restrictions under a 1984 general warranty deed on a small tract of land formerly owned by the city in the Chimney Hill Retail Plaza on University Drive.

7:46 p.m.

Koppe Bridge Zoning Amendment

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to amend the zoning for Koppe Bridge Bar & Grill on Harvey Road to reduce the landscape buffer and allow additional parking between the restaurant and Harvey Hillsides Creek.

Here are the PowerPoint presentations:

8:01 p.m.

BioCorridor Zoning Amendment

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to amend the zoning for the Research Valley BioCorridor Development Project, which covers about 147 acres between State Highway 47, Raymond Stotzer Parkway, Turkey Creek Parkway, and the city limit. The changes would provide process and design flexibility.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:15 p.m.

Blocks and Streets UDO Amendment

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a Unified Development Ordinance amendment to allow more preliminary plans to be approved at the staff level, saving applicants weeks of waiting for a Planning & Zoning Commission meeting.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:36 p.m.

FY19 Bond Authorization

The council voted unanimously to approve the issuance of up to $82 million in FY19 certificates of obligation to fund street, public facilities, electric, water, and wastewater projects, and pay debt issuance costs.

Certificates of obligation are based on the city’s full faith and credit and are paid primarily through the debt service portion of the property tax rate and another funding stream such as utility revenues. The city’s financial advisor recommended the city issue COs for utility projects instead of utility revenue bonds. The utility systems will cover their associated portion of debt service through utility revenues.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:50 p.m.

Francis Drive Emergency Contract

The council voted unanimously to approve a $334,000 emergency construction contract with Larry Young Paving to complete the rehabilitation of Francis Drive from Shady Drive to Glenhaven Drive. The previous contract was terminated, and the emergency contract is necessary to protect public health and safety.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:53 p.m.

General Parkway Extension Change Order

The council voted unanimously to approve a $63,467.50 change order to the contract with Palasota Contracting for the General Parkway Extension North Project, which includes the extension of General Parkway to Cain Road.

At the start of the excavation and embankment operation, the contractor found soft soil and the removal of two inches of soil per specification direction did not remedy the situation. The change order is for the removal of up to three inches of soil with additional stabilization and imported fill to remedy the poor conditions.

The extension of General Parkway will allow for improved transportation flow after the closing of the railroad crossing at Cain Road and Wellborn Road.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:58 p.m.

City Manager Bryan Woods introduced Barbara Moore and Brian Piscacek as assistants to the city manager. Moore moves over after about 12 years as neighborhood services coordinator, while Piscacek served almost seven years as a community development analyst.

9:01 p.m.

The council discussed and reviewed future agenda items.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the meeting. The council meets again on Thursday, April 11.

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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5 things to watch at Monday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Monday at city hall for its workshop (5 p.m.) and regular (6 p.m.) meetings.

Here are five items to watch: (more…)


Celebrating 80 years as the best place in Texas

By Lacey Lively, Marketing Manager

Friday marks the 80th anniversary of College Station’s incorporation as a city. What started as a tiny community of about 2,000 residents has grown into one of the country’s most desirable and fastest-growing cities.

College Station’s estimated population now exceeds 119,000, but it has found a way to maintain its small-town feel and charm. We’re widely recognized as one of the nation’s top places for business, jobs, families, and retirees.

Everyone is invited to celebrate our community’s birthday on Sunday from 2-4 p.m. at Richard Carter Park, located at 1800 Brazoswood Drive. The event will take place, rain or shine. Local organizations will have booths, activities, and tours for all ages that will focus on historic preservation, community service, and education.

Organizations joining the City of College Station include the College Station Historic Preservation Committee, A&M Garden Club, Daughters of the American Revolution: La Villita Chapter, Monarch Gateway, Texas Master Naturalist: Brazos Valley Chapter, Brazos Heritage Society, Texas Research Ramblers Genealogical Society, Wreaths Across America, and the Children’s Museum of the Brazos Valley.

Richard Carter Park is the homestead site of College Station’s earliest settler and was designated as an official state historical site in 1984. Carter’s original land grant from the Mexican government consisted of 4,428 acres and covered most of what College Station is today.

The park features an interpretive center with displays and a reconstruction of the original water well. A bronze sculpture by Albert Pedulla was installed in 1986 and symbolizes the staking of the claim by Carter, which resulted in the settlement of College Station and the Brazos Valley.

In 1991, the graves of Carter, his wife, and family members were relocated to the park from a nearby site.

Learn more about the anniversary celebration and College Station’s history at cstx.gov/heritage.

 


About the Blogger

Marketing Manager Lacey Lively has been with the City of College Station’s Public Communications Office since 2011. She previously worked as an internet marketing consultant for the Bryan-College Station Eagle and as a web designer. A native of Beaumont, Lacey earned a bachelor’s degree in agricultural journalism and communications from Texas A&M in 2009.


 

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Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Sept. 13)

(L-R): Bob Brick, Linda Harvell, Jerome Rektorik, Karl Mooney (mayor), John Nichols, Barry Moore, James Benham.

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Sept. 13. It’s not the official minutes.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink channel 19 or online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:05 p.m.

The workshop has started. No action was taken out of executive session.

5:14 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled these consent items for workshop discussion:

  • Wellborn-Holleman Intersection Project: The $382,122 contract with Binkley & Barfield is for engineering services related to the design of the Wellborn Road-Holleman Intersection Project. Wellborn Road will be elevated to reduce the grade difference with the railroad crossing. Holleman will be widened to accommodate dedicated right and left turn lanes in both directions. The city will manage design and TxDOT will manage bidding and construction.
  • Hawkwood Energy Water Contract: The two-year contract will allow Hawkwood Energy to pump water from ponds on the Hanson South property. Hawkwood will bear the costs and pay the city 10 cents a barrel with a contractual guarantee for at least $150,000 in the contract’s initial year.
  • Hawkwood Energy Franchise: This is the first reading of a non-exclusive pipeline franchise ordinance for oil or gas operations with Hawkwood Energy Midstream, which will pay the city an annual franchise fee of $1 per linear foot of the pipeline franchise area, plus an annual fee of $1,000 for each road or street boring/crossing.

5:22 p.m.

False Fire Alarm Fees

The consensus of the council was to allow the Fire Department to charge a fee for more than three false alarms in 12 months. The Police Department has had false alarm fees in place for several years. The proposed fees range from $85 for four or five false alarms to $143.65 for eight or more alarms.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

5:27 p.m.

After-Hours Fire Inspections

The consensus of the council was to allow the Fire Department to charge $75 per hour for requests for inspections anytime other than weekdays from 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

5:29 p.m.

Mayor Karl Mooney adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar and received committee reports. The regular meeting will start at 6 p.m.

6:00 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

6:06 p.m.

Thank a Police Officer Day

Mayor Mooney proclaimed Sept. 15 as Thank a Police Officer Day. 

6:12 p.m.

Constitution Week

Mayor Mooney proclaimed Sept. 17-23 as Constitution Week

6:19 p.m.

Historical Marker No. 96

The Historic Preservation Committee presented Historical Marker No. 96 for the home at 1106 Carolina St. 

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:30 p.m.

Hear Visitors

Three people spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens might address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda.

  • James Benham recognized Marine Lance Cpl. Seth Huston as part of the Fallen Heroes Memorial program. The 19-year-old Perryton native died Aug. 21, 2004, due to enemy action in Iraq.
  • Mary Troy and Susan Adams spoke against closing the Ringer Library for eight months (November-June) during heavy construction work that’s part of its renovation and expansion.

6:31 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • A contract not to exceed $2.04 million with Kirksey Architecture for the design of a new city hall building.
  • A $382,122.55 contract with Binkley & Barfield for engineering services related to the design of the FM2154 and Holleman Intersection Project.
  • The second renewal of a $259,978.42 contract with Andrews Building Service for janitorial services for city facilities and the Northgate District.
  • A temporary all-way stop at the intersection of Keefer Loop and Rock Prairie Road West during construction of the Holleman Drive South construction project.
  • A $4.26 million contract with Primoris T&D Services for construction of the Graham Road Substation.
  • A contract with Hawkwood Energy to purchase pond water from the city’s water wellfield property called Hanson South.
  • The first renewal of annual copy and print services blanket orders not to exceed $120,000 with AlphaGraphics ($80,000) and Copy Corner ($40,000).
  • The first reading on a non-exclusive pipeline franchise ordinance for oil or gas operations with Hawkwood Energy Midstream to construct, operate, maintain, remove, replace and repair pipeline facilities for the transportation of petroleum products and byproducts.
  • The second renewal of a $256,384 contract with Utility Restoration Services for padmount equipment repair and restoration.
  • FY18 funding of $1,073,572 to the Public Agency Retirement Services OPEB Trust.
  • A $101,248.30 contract with Hurricane Fence Company to replace the security fencing at three city water well facilities along Sandy Point Road.
  • A negotiated settlement between the Atmos Cities Steering Committee and Atmos Energy Mid-Tex Division regarding the company’s 2018 rate review mechanism filings and a settlement agreement.

6:43 p.m.

Tax Rate Public Hearing

The council conducted the final public hearing on the city’s proposed FY19 tax rate of.505841 cents per $100 of assessed value. The .8341-cent increase would offset the revenue loss from the five percent homestead exemption the council approved earlier this year.

Two people spoke against the tax increase in the public hearing.

The council will vote on the tax rate on Sept. 27.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:45 p.m.

FY19 Budget Public Hearing

The council conducted the final public hearing on the city’s FY19 budget, which totals $360.68 million. The council will vote on the budget on Sept. 27.

No one spoke during the public hearing.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:47 p.m.

Church Street Easement Abandonment

After a public hearing, the council voted 6-0 approved the abandonment of a 15-foot wide public utility easement at 603 Church Ave. to accommodate the expansion of St. Mary’s Church. Councilman John Nichols abstained.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:10 p.m.

Single-Family Parking

After a public hearing, the council voted 6-1 to amend the city’s Unified Development Ordinance to remove the cap of requiring no more than four parking spaces for a single-family dwelling unit in areas designated Neighborhood Conservation in the Comprehensive Plan. The cap will remain for other areas.

Councilwoman Linda Harvell voted against the motion.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:25 p.m.

BioCorridor Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted 6-0 to approve a request to amend the terms and development standards for the BioCorridor Planned Development District, which covers about 147 acres between State Highway 47, Raymond Stotzer Parkway, Turkey Creek Parkway, and the city limit. Councilman Barry Moore abstained.

The action amended Sec. 1.2.d to add “Stand-alone multi-family on property located between Turkey Creek Road and the proposed Atlas Pear Drive extension” and Sec. 1.2.e to add to the prohibition, “Multi-Family not part of a mixed-used development except as otherwise allowed in Sec. 1.2.d.”

The remaining sections will be sent back to the BioCorridor Board for review.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:32 p.m.

The council discussed and reviewed future agenda items.

8:32 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the meeting. The council meets again on Thursday, Sept. 27.

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

If you found value in this blog post, please share it with your social network and friends!

 


Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (July 26)

(L-R): Bob Brick, Linda Harvell, Jerome Rektorik, Karl Mooney (mayor), John Nichols, Barry Moore, James Benham.

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, July 26. It’s not the official minutes.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink channel 19 or online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:26 p.m.

The workshop has started. No action was taken out of executive session.

Councilmen Bob Brick and James Benham are participating by teleconference. Councilman Jerome Rekrotik is absent tonight.

5:35 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled these consent items for workshop discussion:

  • Carters Creek Wastewater Plant Improvements: The $608,000 contract is for design and construction phase services for centrifuge improvements at the Carters Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant.
  • East Side Sewer and Lift Station: The $267,000 contract is for design and construction phase services for the East Side Sewer and Lift Station Project.

5:47 p.m.

BVSWMA Budget

The council unanimously endorsed the Brazos Valley Solid Waste Management Agency’s FY19 budget, which includes $8.64 million in revenue, $6.42 million in operating expenses, and $3.67 million in capital expenses. Total reserves, cash, and investments are $11.75 million.

The budget also reduces the gate rate for the cities of Bryan and College Station from $20 to $18.50 per ton.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:07 p.m.

Texas Weekend of Remembrance

After reviewing the 2018 Texas Weekend of Remembrance, the council directed staff to continue plans for 2019.

The TWR is a time for military members, veterans, and their families to come together and honor the memory of their lost loved ones through camaraderie and commemoration of their sacrifice. The Memorial Day weekend event allows everyone to show their pride and respect for the men and women who paid the ultimate price.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:08 p.m.

Mayor Karl Mooney suspended the workshop. The regular meeting will start after a short break.

6:13 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

6:34 p.m.

Historical Markers

The Historic Preservation Committee presented historical markers to St. Matthew Baptist Church (409 Holleman Dr.), Pleasant Grove Baptist Church (1216 Detroit St.), Sterling Whitley (500 Holleman Dr.), Thomas & Sharon Merchant (1102 Detroit St.), Bobby Searcy & Adrian Merchant (1106 Phoenix St.), and Rudell Baker-Wilson (1202 Phoenix St.).

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:39 p.m.

Hear Visitors

One person spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens might address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda.

  • Ann Marsh spoke about ways the city can solve issues caused by trash containers.

6:41 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • An amendment to the Solid Waste Facilities Operations Agreement with BVSWMA that governs communications and procedures during extended periods of landfill inaccessibility.
  • The first reading of a franchise agreement with Organix Recycling for the collection of recyclables from commercial businesses and multi-family locations.
  • A contract with Pebble Creek Interests for easements needed for the Lick Creek Parallel Wastewater Trunk Line Project.
  • A contract with Aggieland Properties for land needed for the State Highway 47 Electric Substation Project.
  • A second amendment to the lease agreement with Wirestar that increases the leased fiber optic strand miles to 88.74.
  • An annual price agreement not to exceed $1,873,500 with Knife River ($1.44 million) and BPI Material ($438,000) for Type D hot mix asphalt for the maintenance of streets
  • A $209,656 contract with CF McDonald Electric to install purchased VFDs at Sandy Point Pump Station.
  • The removal of parking on the west side of Boyett Street beginning 60 feet north of the intersection of University Drive and ending 130 feet north of University Drive on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights.
  • The creation of a passenger loading zone in the Northgate Promenade Parking Lot to help address pedestrian safety and traffic congestion issues. The loading zone would be in place from 9 p.m.-3 a.m.
  • Changed the definition of a junked vehicle in the city’s Code of Ordinances to align with the Texas Transportation Code. The amendment also transfers cost responsibility
  • to remove a junked vehicle from the city to the owner.
  • A $60,000 change order for the contractor to bore under Wellborn Road and the railroad track to build an additional feeder to the Jones Crossing development.
  • A $608,000 contract with Jones and Carter for design and construction phase services for the Carters Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant Centrifuge Improvements Project.
  • A $267,000 contract with Jones and Carter for design and construction phase services for the East Side Sewer and Lift Station Project.
  • A contract not to exceed $120,000 with Krause Paint and Body Shop for heavy truck paint and body repairs.
  • A $800,077.30 bid award for annual blanket purchase agreements for electrical items: KBS Electrical Distributors ($100,044.30), Wesco Distributors ($41,898), Texas Electric Cooperatives ($119,737.50), Techline ($509,373.50), and Anixter ($29,024).

This item was moved to the Aug. 9 council meeting:

  • Renewal of the inter-local agreement with the City of Bryan for management of the Larry J. Ringer Library.

6:55 p.m.

Committee Term Lengths and Limits

After a public hearing, the council unanimously voted to change the term lengths for appointees to various city boards, commissions, and committees to three years – except for the Planning & Zoning Commission – and to remove term limits that aren’t required by law. Planning and Zoning commissioners will continue to be limited to two terms.

The modifications are a response to the declining number of citizens applying to serve. 

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:09 p.m.

Fun for All Playground

The council unanimously approved a $942,123 construction contract for the first phase of an all-abilities park at Central Park. The Fun for All Playground will be a fully accessible park that will provide inclusive play for everyone.

The improvements will be funded primarily by civic groups and private citizens. Phase 1 includes a playground, swings, splash pad, parking, fencing, and general infrastructure.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:10 p.m.

The council discussed and reviewed future agenda items.

7:10 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the meeting. The workshop will resume after a short break.

7:17 p.m.

The workshop has resumed.

8:21 p.m.

Possible City Charter Amendments

The council discussed possible city charter amendments that may be included in a special election in November: They approved the following items for the ballot:

  • Expand the terms from three to four years for mayor and city council members with regular elections in even-numbered years.
  • Expansion of residency requirement for the city manager and city attorney to allow them to live in the extraterritorial jurisdiction.
  • The mandatory appointment of an internal auditor.
  • Add language permitting the city to specify by ordinance the notice required for competitive bids and proposals.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:23 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar and received committee reports. The council meets again on Thursday, Aug. 9.

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (5 p.m.) and regular (6 p.m.) meetings.

Here are five items to watch:

  1. Possible City Charter Amendments: The council will have a workshop discussion about proposed city charter amendments that may be placed on the ballot in the November election.
  2. Historical Marker Presentations: The Historic Preservation Committee will present historical markers to the owners of six homes.
  3. Boyett Parking Removal:  As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider the removal of parking on the west side of Boyett Street on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights. The no parking zone would start 60 feet north of University Drive and extend another 160 feet.
  4. Northgate Passenger Loading Zone: Another consent agenda item is the creation of a passenger loading zone in the Northgate Promenade Parking Lot to help address pedestrian safety and traffic congestion issues. The loading zone would be in place from 9 p.m.-3 a.m.
  5. Fun for All Playground: The council will consider a $942,123 contract with CRT GC, Inc. for construction of a Fun for All Playground at Beachy Central Park. The all abilities facility would provide accessible and inclusive play for everyone and will be funded primarily by private donations and civic groups.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Channels 19 or online. We’ll post a detailed live blog on this site.

Related Links:                                                                 

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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