Posts tagged “Police

Police chief addresses CSPD’s policies, use of force 

By Billy Couch, College Station Police Chief

The national discussion about race relations and policing has touched every corner of our country, including College Station. It’s essential that we understand the perspectives of all members of our community.

As a department, the College Station Police Department has initiated open dialogue with local black leaders about productive ways to strengthen our community relationships. These open and transparent conversations are the foundation of how trust is established.

Accountability is essential, not just to the police profession, but for being accountable to the community we serve. CSPD’s mission is “To Protect and Serve with Excellence.”  The members of our organization are committed to that mission and strive to serve all with dignity and respect.

In recent weeks, we received several questions about the department’s policies and procedures regarding unbiased policing, body-worn cameras, professional standards, and the use of force.

Allow me to address each of those areas.

Unbiased Policing

CSPD thoroughly trains its personnel to avoid bias-based policing and discriminatory activities. Our officers focus on behavior and specific suspect information when we take police action. We won’t take action based on race (racial profiling), ethnic background, national origin, citizenship, gender, sexual orientation, religion, economic status, age, or cultural group.

CSPD aggressively investigates instances of bias-based policing. Employees engaging in such conduct will be held accountable with appropriate disciplinary action, including termination.

Body-Worn Cameras

We have used body-worn cameras since 2014 and issue them to all sworn officers who routinely interact with the public. Along with in-car video and audio recorders, the cameras are essential law enforcement tools. These tools help with the effective prosecution of criminal cases and provide a layer of transparency for the daily activities of a police officer.

The cameras must be activated when it’s practical and safe during traffic stops, pursuits, person and vehicle searches, physical and verbal confrontations, use-of-force incidents, obtaining statements from victims and witnesses, the advising of Miranda rights, interrogations, and other legitimate law enforcement contacts.

Complaints

CSPD documents and investigates all complaints, regardless of whether the source comes from inside or outside the police department. That includes anonymous complaints. Our policy protects the community, our personnel, and the department while identifying and correcting inappropriate behavior or policy issues.

In cases where a pending offense is being considered by the courts, we refer those complainants with case-specific concerns to the appropriate court. If additional concerns exist outside of the offense the court is considering, we’ll investigate those concerns to reach a resolution.

If you are aware of a CSPD employee’s misconduct, we encourage you to file a complaint with the police department at any time:

  • Appear in person at the Police Department.
  • Call Internal Affairs at 979-764-3651 during business hours.
  • Call 979-764-3600 and ask to speak with a supervisor.
  • Email: iaunit@cstx.gov.
  • Mail: CSPD Internal Affairs, P.O. Box 9960, College Station, TX 77842.

Complaints are thoroughly explored by an assigned investigator, reviewed by the chain of command, and then sent to a chief for final disposition. When the investigation is complete, we notify the complainant. If necessary, and depending on the circumstances, we discipline the officer or provide additional training.

For more information, go to cstx.gov/police. Compliments and Complaints pamphlets are available in the department lobby and College Station City Hall.

Recruiting and Training

CSPD seeks to recruit and hire good people who possess a servant’s heart and dedicate themselves to continuous improvement. We want our personnel to serve with compassion, respect, and kindness. We are fully committed to character-based hiring and enlisting employees who will adhere to the highest level of professional service and standards.

Our organization strives to mirror the diversity of our city demographics. The police department is underrepresented by minority employees, and we don’t reflect the demographics we want to achieve. In spite of targeted recruiting efforts, we fall short.

We implore our citizens to encourage minority citizens to consider the police department as viable career choice. We ask that they inspire our youth to learn more about policing and consider it a noble profession where serving others can be a fulfilling career.

Our meticulous hiring process includes a rigorous exam, physical test, extensive board interviews, thorough background investigation, polygraph exam, psychological evaluation, and an interview with a chief. When the process is complete, new officers attend a basic, 17-week police academy.

After graduation, officers participate in a field training program. We pair them with field training officers who have been selected and trained to ensure they pass on the appropriate practices and principles. The new officers then endure an additional 20 weeks of field training and first-hand observation.

We emphasize providing state-of-the-art training with a focus on de-escalation techniques and crisis intervention. Our overriding policy is to respect and value human life.

Use of Force

Each year, we average about 100,000 citizen contacts. Those contact lead to the use force about 100 times.

An officer’s determination for using force and the level of force used is based upon the officer’s evaluation of the situation in light of the totality of the circumstances known to the officer at the time the force is applied. The determination is based upon what a reasonably prudent officer would use under the same or similar situations, rather than the perfect vision of hindsight.

Due to the consequential nature of using any degree of force — including deadly force — our officers receive annual training on our Use of Force Policy and the authority to use force under the Texas Penal Code. Employees receive legal updates on the use of force as changes occur.

Periodically, we provide additional training to reinforce the importance of effective communication, de-escalation and to strengthen our use of proper techniques.

Some residents have asked us about specific use-of-force policy recommendations, as presented by 8cantwait.org. Here’s how CSPD policies specifically apply to those eight proposals:

1. Require officers to report unnecessary force used by fellow police officers.

CSPD employees who know about a potential violation of the law, regulation, or policy are required to report it through their chain of command, the city’s human resources director, or our ethics hotline (877-874-8416) or cstx.alertline.com. They must also immediately notify their supervisor of any on-duty injury.

The policy further requires personnel to report uses of force in our Internal Affairs (I.A.) system. Each incident is individually reviewed for policy compliance by the supervisory chain of command — and by I.A., if necessary.  Employees must answer all questions related to the matter. Lying, omitting crucial details, or refusing to cooperate with an I.A. investigation ultimately could be grounds for termination.

2. Restrict higher levels of force to be used only in extreme situations.

CSPD requires the use of de-escalation techniques and other alternatives when possible, safe, and appropriate before using force or using higher levels of force. When de-escalation techniques are not effective or appropriate, officers will employ less-lethal force to control a non-compliant or actively resistant person.

An officer is authorized to use approved less-lethal force techniques and department-issued equipment to protect the officer or others from immediate physical harm, to restrain or subdue someone resisting or evading arrest, or to bring an unlawful situation safely and effectively under control. Officers may use deadly force when it is objectively reasonable under the totality of the circumstances. Use of deadly force is justified in defense of human life — including the officer’s life — from what is reasonably believed to be an immediate threat of death or serious injury.

Officers may also use such force to prevent a subject from fleeing when they committed — or intend to commit — a felony involving serious injury or death. The officer must reasonably believe there is an immediate risk of serious bodily injury or death to the officer or others if the subject is not immediately apprehended.

3. Ban shooting at moving vehicles.

CSPD policy prohibits shooting at a moving vehicle unless a person in the vehicle is threatening the officer or someone else with deadly force by means other than the vehicle, or the vehicle is operated in a manner deliberately intended to strike an officer or another person.  Other reasonable defenses will first be used, such as getting out of the vehicle’s path.

4. Require officers to intervene to stop another officer from using excessive force.

Any force our officers use must be objectively reasonable and necessary to effectively accomplish lawful objectives while protecting the public and our officers’ lives. Officers will always try to minimize pain and injury that may result from the use of force.

While on duty, they will assist citizens as needed when it doesn’t conflict with law enforcement principles or violate laws or department policies.

5. Force officers to exhaust all other reasonable alternatives before using deadly force.

Officers should consider force-mitigating circumstances when dealing with someone who is injured or receiving medical care. That may include the level and immediacy of the threat or danger, the person’s ability to carry it out, and alternative methods of force. Deadly force shouldn’t be used against those whose actions threaten only themselves or property.

6. Require officers to give a verbal warning before shooting.

When it is safe and practical, our officers are trained to provide warnings before using force. Before taking action, officers will identify themselves by displaying their badge and identification card — unless it’s impractical or when their identity is apparent.

7. Require officers to de-escalate situations before they turn extreme or deadly.

CSPD requires the use of de-escalation techniques and other alternatives when possible, safe, and appropriate before resorting to higher levels of force. Whenever possible, officers will allow individuals time and opportunity to comply with verbal commands unless a delay compromises safety or could result in evidence destruction, the suspect’s escape, or the commission of a crime.

8. Ban chokeholds and strangleholds.

CSPD policies and practices prohibit neck restraints, Lateral Vascular Neck Restraints (LVNR), or similar weaponless control techniques that can cause serious injury or death. LVNR is a choke, sleeper, or other hold intended to disrupt the flow of blood or oxygen to the brain, which can lead to a temporary unconsciousness.

Final Thoughts

As always, the College Station Police Department deeply appreciates your support and will never take it for granted.

As a nationally accredited law enforcement agency for almost 30 years, we adhere to the best practices and highest standards in our industry. That means we continually review our policies and practices to ensure our officers conduct themselves with the highest level of professionalism and integrity.

We are entirely and unequivocally committed to protecting, serving, and proactively engaging with everyone in our community. If you see ways we can do better, please let me know.

I’m always ready to listen and learn.

 


About the Blogger

A 23-year veteran of the College Station Police Department, Billy Couch was named police chief in May after seven years as an assistant chief. He previously served as a patrol lieutenant, patrol/traffic sergeant, SWAT team member, narcotics investigator, and patrol officer. Couch earned a bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M, a master’s from Sam Houston State, and graduated from the FBI’s National Academy.


 

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5 ways to protect your property, stop vehicle break-ins

43435011 - transportation crime concept .thief stealing bag from the car

Lt. Steve Brock, CSPD Public Information Officer

Since the start of 2017, about 57 percent of the reported vehicle burglaries in College Station have been the result of owners leaving their cars and trucks unlocked.

texas_gun_rights_bumper_sticker-rd873d81da0ec48959af36cea1496add6_v9wht_8byvr_324A recent trend has been for burglars to target trucks displaying stickers or emblems that suggest a firearm could be inside. After breaking a window, they quickly search the interior, especially areas where a firearm could be stored.

Since burglary is a crime of opportunity, prevention is the key. By following these five simple rules, you can make vehicle break-ins less enticing and much more challenging:

  1. Lock your vehicle.
  2. Park in a well-lit area.
  3. Take your valuables with you, hide them in the vehicle, or lock them in the trunk.
  4. Consider removing stickers and emblems that suggest a firearm may be inside.
  5. Consider leaving your gun at home or carry it with you when legal.

By being vigilant and careful, you can help us protect your property and prevent vehicle burglaries.

 


About the Author

Lt. Steve Brock has been with the College Station Police Department since 2004.


 

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Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Dec. 10)

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Dec. 10. It’s not the official minutes.

The meeting is being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and streamed online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

Before going into executive session this afternoon, the council recognized longtime Development Coordinator Bridgette George as the city’s 2015 employee of the year (pictured below with Mayor Nancy Berry and City Manager Kelly Templin). Coincidentally, George celebrated her 25th anniversary with the city today. 

cs-er-bridgette

6:21 p.m.

The workshop has started.

6:22 p.m.

Amendment to Kalon Therapeutics Agreement

The council took action on one item it discussed in its executive session, unanimously approving an amendment to an economic development agreement with Kalon Therapeutics. The amendment extends the completion of improvements from Dec. 31, 2015, to Dec. 31, 2016, and is contingent on the City of Bryan’s approval.

6:46 p.m. (more…)


5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (about 5:30 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:

  1. Ringer Library Expansion: The council will hear a workshop presentation on the proposed conceptual design of the voted-approved $8.4 million expansion of the Larry J. Ringer Library.
  2. Street Maintenance Audit: The council will discuss the city auditor’s street maintenance report, including recommendations to address the high turnover rate of skilled employees and how to best maintain construction standards.
  3. CSPD Re-Accreditation: During the regular meeting, the council will recognize the Police Department for the re-accreditation of its law enforcement and communications programs.
  4. Police-Related Consent Items: The consent agenda includes several items related to CSPD, including 65 new Tasers, an upgrade for the department’s existing bomb robot, and the replacement of five 2010 motorcycles. A federal grant will pay for the robot upgrade.
  5. Arts Council Building Agreement: The council will consider extending the use agreement with the Arts Council of Brazos Valley regarding the city-owned building at 2275 Dartmouth Dr. The agreement is for a one-year extension with an option for an additional year as the organization continues its plans for a new location.

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Live Blog: Monday’s city council meetings (Nov. 23)

College Station City Council

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Monday, Nov. 23. It’s not the official minutes.

The meeting is being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and streamed online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

The workshop will start about 5:30 p.m., followed by the regular meeting at 7.

5:40 p.m.

The workshop has started.

Elected Mayor Pro Tem

The council voted unanimously to elect Place-4 Councilman John Nichols for a one-year term as mayor pro tem, which acts as mayor if the mayor is disabled or absent. Nichols replaces Place-1 Councilwoman Blanche Brick in that role.

5:41 p.m. (more…)


Video: CSPD officer, citizens rescue man from burning car

A man was rescued from a burning car on George Bush Drive Saturday night by the courageous actions of a College Station police officer and several citizens.

Officer Patricia Marty, with the assistance of Texas A&M Transportation Services employees Joel Luce and Greg Stuenkel, pulled Jose Izquierdo from the vehicle just in the nick of time.

Click here for the CSPD press release about the incident.

Officer Marty’s dash camera captured the dramatic scene:

If you found value in this blog post, please share it with your social network and friends!

 

 


Five things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Communications Manager

gavel[1]The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (5:30 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:

  1. Relationship with Belgium: The council will receive a workshop presentation from the Research Valley Partnership on the evolving economic development relationship with Belgium anchored by the Aggies Go to War exhibit.
  2. Police Ammunition Purchase: The council will consider two contracts totaling about $136,000 for ammunition to be used on-duty and in training exercises.
  3. Umpires Agreement: The council will consider a contract not to exceed $190,000 with the Brazos Valley Softball Umpires Association for officiating services for the city’s athletic leagues and tournaments.
  4. Electric System Right-of-Way Clearing: The council will consider awarding a three-year contract for $1.28 million for clearing overhead power lines and clearing easements and rights-of-way for the construction of new power lines.
  5. The Barracks II Rezoning: After a public hearing, the council will consider rezoning several tracts near The Barracks II Subdivision to allow for the development of additional townhomes.

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Our Top 5 Blog Posts from 2014

Top 5 Blog Posts of 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Jay Socol, Public Communications Director

Do you have any idea how difficult it is convincing you to abandon your news, sports and entertainment sources long enough to read about our exciting world of city government?

It’s plenty tough, believe me. In 2014, as with previous years, we tried to present you with useful, reliable information through this blog. It seemed to have worked: There were more than 57,000 views to 120 blog posts. Which ones were the most popular?

Glad you asked. Based on number of views, here are the top five posts that earned your interest and attention.

No. 5
10 game day parking citations you can easily avoid (more…)


CSPD officer used SABA kit to save citizen’s life

By Lt. Chuck Fleeger, CSPD Public Information Officer

badge-officerLate on the night of Oct. 15, Daniel Crites was among the College Station police officers who responded to a call about a person needing medical attention. Arriving ahead of paramedics, the officers found the individual’s condition rapidly deteriorating.

Officer Crites realized the person was having difficulty breathing and discovered that swelling had obstructed the airway. Crites inserted a pharyngeal tube from his department-issued Self Aid Buddy Aid (SABA) kit through the individual’s nose, allowing air into the lungs. The citizen was soon transported to a hospital and was successfully treated.

Paramedics and hospital personnel said Crite’s quick actions saved the person’s life.

(more…)


CSPD program recognizes Public Works employee

City Watch - Andy GarciaLast month, sanitation route manager Andy Garcia was working his route when he found a convenience store employee unconscious near a dumpster. Andy promptly notified the police, who discovered the store had been robbed and the employee assaulted. Andy’s awareness and quick response allowed the store employee to receive the medical attention he needed. The robbery is still being investigated.

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Live Blog: Thursday’s City Council Meetings (April 11)

This is a live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, April 11. It’s not the official minutes.

Both meetings are being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and can also be watched online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

6:15 p.m.

The workshop has started.

6:25 p.m.

The council discussed its calendar, future agenda items and received committee reports.

(more…)


Live Blog: Thursday’s City Council Meetings (March 28)

This is a live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, March 28. It’s not the official minutes.

Both meetings are being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and can also be watched online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

6:07 p.m.

The workshop has started.

6:08 p.m.

Simpson named city manager

Frank SimpsonThe council unanimously voted to select Frank Simpson as city manager. Simpson was named interim city manager in January when David Neeley retired. He had served as deputy city manager since 2011, overseeing  Public Works, Water Services, and the Electric Utility. Simpson came to the City of College Station after serving as city manager of Missouri City for seven years (2004-11). He previously served as city manager of Webster (2001-04) and Center (1995-01), and was an assistant city manager in La Marque (1994-95).

Simpson began his long municipal government career as a public utilities worker for the City of College Station in 1986 while attending Texas A&M. He earned a bachelor’s degree in political science in 1988 and a master’s in public administration from A&M in 1990. Simpson worked in various administrative capacities with the City of College Station from 1989-93. He and his wife, Kelly, have three children.

(more…)


Live Blog: Thursday’s City Council Meetings (Feb. 28)

This is a live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Feb. 28. It’s not the official minutes.

Both meetings are being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and can also be watched online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

6:13 p.m.

The workshop meeting has started.

6:16 p.m.

Mayor Nancy Berry proclaimed March as National Nutrition Month with a presentation to the Mid East Texas Dietetic Association (METDA). Pictured below with the mayor (right) is Meghan Windham, president-elect of METDA. (more…)


Five things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

gavel[1]Here are five items to watch when the College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (6 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings:

  1. State of Police Department Update: The council will hear Police Chief Jeff Capps’ annual report on the state of the Police Department, including a review of the city’s 2012 crime statistics. (more…)

Five things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

gavel[1]What are you doing for Valentine’s Day?

The College Station City Council is spending it at city hall, where it will gather Thursday for its workshop (6 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings.

What could possibly be more romantic than that?

Here’s five things to watch:   (more…)


Mental health facility will fill community void

Jim Shaheen of SBH addresses local officials at Tuesday's groundbreaking.

Jim Shaheen of SBH addresses local officials at Tuesday’s groundbreaking.

If you happened to drive past the groundbreaking ceremony for the new mental health facility Tuesday morning, you might have noticed a significant number of law enforcement personnel in attendance.

No, the governor wasn’t speaking and we weren’t there for security. Representatives from all our local public safety agencies were there to offer our wholehearted support to the new Strategic Behavioral Health hospital, which will fill a vital need in our area when it opens early next year.

In my 20 years with the College Station Police Department, we’ve dealt with countless numbers of people suffering from mental health issues. Our officers are trained to deal with these situations, but they aren’t mental health professionals. Many of these individuals end up in jail or are taken to the nearest emergency room when proper treatment could have relieved or prevented the situation.

Through our daily experiences, law enforcement officers genuinely understand the struggles mental illness creates for families. Most of the time, these individuals are able to cope with their illnesses, but any number of things can trigger a crisis. If proper intervention, treatment and support systems are available, the patient usually gets better. 

(more…)


Live Blog: Thursday’s City Council Meetings (Nov. 8)

This is a live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Nov. 8. It’s not the official minutes.

The workshop and regular meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Ch. 19, or online. An archive of previous council meetings also is available on the site.

6:08 p.m.

The workshop meeting has started. Council member Katy-Marie Lyles is absent tonight.

6:22 p.m.

Employer Support of Guard/Reserves

Since Veteran’s Day is Sunday, the council received a special workshop presentation on the city’s support and hiring of veterans, and their participation in the Guard and Reserve. The council also recognized several service member/employees in attendance.

(more…)


College Station Municipal Court doesn’t have to be a scary place

Warrant Amnesty runs Oct. 15-26

As a judge, I see a number of people after they’ve been arrested and are in jail on an outstanding warrant. Often, they are very happy to see me since they associate me with releasing them from jail. I’ll ask them why they didn’t come to College Station Municipal Court in the first place and the response I hear so many times is either:

  1. “I didn’t think ignoring a ticket could get you arrested,” or
  2. “I was saving up money and, until I had the money to pay the fine, I wasn’t going to court to make my plea.”

Most Class-C misdemeanors are handled through citizens receiving a ticket rather than being arrested. These include offenses like a minor in possession of alcohol, disorderly conduct due to noise, assault, theft under fifty dollars, and most traffic offenses and city ordinance violations — all criminal offenses in Texas. When you sign the ticket promising to appear, that signature acts as your promise to appear in court, versus being arrested and posting a bond guaranteeing your appearance.

(more…)


National Night Out builds stronger neighborhoods

To me, the best thing about National Night Out is just seeing neighbors having open discussions about the things that affect their neighborhoods — and what they can do to make those neighborhoods better. As a witness to many National Night Out celebrations through the years, I can attest to the collaborative spirit these events can produce.

The cities of College Station and Bryan will observe the 29th National Night Out on Tuesday with numerous block parties and celebrations designed to bring residents and local law enforcement together. College Station police officers answer questions and provide insight and information about crime prevention and ways to build safer neighborhoods. Residents will also likely cross paths with city officials such as the mayor, city council members and city managers.

In College Station, at least 40 neighborhoods participate each year, many for the first time, forging strong relationships and discovering the power of unified neighborhoods. With National Night Out as a starting point, neighbors begin talking more frequently about concerns and issues, and work together to resolve those problems. These neighborhood groups often evolve into a strong neighborhood organization that develops a true sense of community.

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Live Blog: Thursday’s City Council Meetings (Sept. 27)

This is a live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Sept. 27. It’s not the official minutes.

The workshop and regular meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Ch. 19, or online. An archive of previous council meetings also is available on the site.

6:13 p.m.

The workshop meeting has started.

6:32 p.m.

Wastewater Treatment Plant Headworks Project 

The council received a presentation on the $1.5 million Carters Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant Headworks Projects, which is on the consent agenda for tonight’s regular meeting. In the first step in the treatment process, untreated wastewater flows into the headworks from the collection system. Large objects and sediment are removed so the wastewater can continue through the rest of the process.

Although key equipment is worn out and needs either replacement or rehabilitation, this project includes only items needed to restore functionality to existing equipment. The improvements are for the screw lift pumps, grit and grease removal systems, oiler system, odor controls and junction box, which will allow the headworks to operate until information is received from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality about future permit restrictions, which could require major changes to the headworks structure.

(more…)


Tragic event brought our community closer together

Note: This blog was published as a guest column in Sunday’s edition of The Eagle.

No one in our community will ever forget the senseless act that claimed the lives of Chris Northcliffe and Constable Brian Bachmann, and left several others injured. Nor will we forget the extraordinary way our residents responded to one of the more painful events in our history.

As we begin to heal, it’s appropriate to recognize and offer our sincere appreciation to those who put themselves in harm’s way that day to ensure that more lives were not lost. The timely and valiant actions of College Station police officers and firefighters revealed remarkable courage and professionalism.

The tragic events of Aug. 13 were a sobering reminder of the dangers our first responders face each day. These selfless professionals have dedicated their lives to keeping our streets safe and responding to emergencies, always placing our safety above their own. Regrettably, we take their heroism, bravery and service for granted too often. 

(more…)


Live Blog: Thursday’s City Council Meetings (July 26)

This is a live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, July 26. It’s not the official minutes.

The workshop and regular meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Ch. 19, or online. An archive of previous council meetings also is available on the site.

6:04 p.m.

The workshop meeting has started. Council member Jess Fields is absent.

7:01 p.m.

Economic Development Master Plan

The council heard an update on the first phase of the Economic Development Master Plan, which is being prepared as part of the city’s Comprehensive Plan. The first phase focuses on demographics, socioeconomic data, a preliminary assessment of market conditions, and preliminary identification of opportunities and challenges in the local market.

(more…)


Live Blog: Thursday’s City Council Meetings (July 12)

This is a live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, July 12. It is not the official minutes.

The workshop and regular meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Ch. 19, or online. An archive of previous council meetings also is available on the site.

6:08 p.m.

The workshop meeting has started.

6:19 p.m.

Private Landfill Public Meeting Update

The council heard an update on a public meeting set for Friday, July 19 about a proposed permit for a private landfill within College Station’s extraterritorial jurisdiction. The applicant and representatives from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality will attend the public meeting at 7 p.m. at the Brazos County Expo Complex.

(more…)


City Council Preview (July 12)

Here’s a quick look at some of the items the College Station City Council will be discussing at its workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, July 12. This blog is not the complete and official agenda.

The workshop and regular meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Ch. 19, or online. Previous council meetings are archived on the website. A detailed live blog from the meetings will be posted on this site and can also be accessed through the city’s Facebook page.

Workshop Meeting (6 p.m.)

Private Landfill Public Meeting Update

The council will receive an update on a public meeting set for July 19 about a proposed permit for a private landfill within College Station’s extraterritorial jurisdiction. The applicant and representatives from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality will attend the public meeting at 7 p.m. at the Brazos County Expo Complex.

(more…)