Posts tagged “impact fees

5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

2016-city-council

2016-city-council

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (6 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:

  1. Roadway Impact Fees: In the workshop, the council will discuss the recently adopted roadway impact fees and provide additional direction to city staff.
  2. Spring Creek Local Government Corporation: The council will also have a workshop discussion about forming a non-profit government corporation to promote economic development anchored by the Spring Creek Corporate Campus, College Station’s next business park. The effort was recommended for approval by the council’s Economic Development Committee in December.
  3. Southside Safety Improvements: As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider a $359,000 contract for design and construction phase services related to street safety improvements along Park Place, Holik, Glade and Anna Streets near Oakwood Intermediate School and A&M Consolidated Middle School.
  4. Pooh’s Park Rezoning: After public hearings, the council will consider a request to change the land use and zoning designations for about six acres southwest of the intersection of Holleman Drive East and Lassie Lane in the Pooh’s Park Subdivision. The changes would accommodate a multi-family infill development.
  5. Board and Committee Appointments: The council will consider appointments to the BioCorridor Board and various city boards and commissions.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Ch. 19, or online. The website includes an archive of previous council meetings. We’ll post a detailed live blog on this site.

Related Links                                                                 

 


14316755_10108798313965164_2904942172107966680_nAbout the Author

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian)has been with the City of College Station since 2010. He previously served 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


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Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Nov. 10)

2014 Council

2014 Council

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Nov. 10. It’s not the official minutes.

The meeting is being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and streamed online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:46 p.m.

The workshop has started. Councilwoman Julie Schultz announced the following action taken in executive session:

“I move that the city manager is hereby authorized to settle the claim brought by Kathleen M. Ritch, individually and on behalf of Alannah Ritch and Andrew J. Ritch, in an amount not to exceed $250,000 and to execute a settlement and release containing terms as are customarily contained in settlement agreements.”

6;03 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled these consent items for workshop discussion:

  • Viasat Economic Development Agreement: The agreement provides for Viasat’s expansion into a new 85,000-square foot building on about nine acres in the Biocorridor. The company’s total investment is about $20 million with a minimum property valuation of $15 million by 2019. By the end of the second year following construction, Viasat will add at least 150 new full-time jobs with an average salary of $64,000 and the current payroll will increase by $9.6 million for a total of $17.2 million. In exchange, Viasat will receive an annual cash incentive for six years equal to the ad valorem taxes assessed and paid not to exceed $450,000. Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

  • Bee Creek Trunk Line Rehabilitation: The $4.6 million contract with Elliott Construction includes the installation of about 2,000 linear feet of 60-inch and 4,000 linear feet of 54-inch sanitary sewer main along Bee Creek from Carter’s Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant to west of State Highway 6. This contract is for the second of four phases to replace the Bee Creek Trunk Line that runs from Carters Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant to about 1,100 feet west of Jones Butler Road. Much of the existing trunk line was constructed in 1973 and was shown to have several surcharging line segments in the 2011 Wastewater Master Plan. The project will install a gravity line to increase the capacity of the trunk line to accept the anticipated build-out demand.
  • Utility Agreement with MUD No. 1: Approval of this item will modify the utility agreement with Brazos County Municipal Utility District No. 1 to include a surcharge for water and wastewater rates in the MUD without the charge of impact fees. It also specifies that city staff will recommend that the city council establish a Public Utility Corridor across Lick Creek Park for a sewer line to the Lick Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant. The diversion of parkland is on tonight’s regular agenda. The change would allow the Southern Pointe development to proceed. The surcharge would provide the same revenue as impact fees but would be spread over about 20 years. The PUC will have zero cost to the city.
  • Roadway Maintenance Fees: The results of the 2016 Citizen Survey suggested citizens prefer to see additional resources invested in the area of street maintenance. As part of the 2016 budget process, staff evaluated alternative sources to help fund the needed maintenance. After a detailed evaluation of various options, staff recommended implementing a roadway maintenance fee to be paid by citizens and businesses. The fees are based on reasonably equal shares in the total number of vehicle miles generated by all properties in the city limits and would be added to utility bills. The monthly fees would be $7.78 for single family, $6.10 for multi-family and a commercial range of $17.23 to $250. The fee would generate about $4.5 million per year. Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

 

6:33 p.m.

Pavement Standards

The council voted 4-3 for the city to use concrete in street construction rather than asphalt. Voting against the motion were Councilwoman Julie Schultz, and Councilmen Karl Mooney and Steve Aldrich. A study found that initial construction costs for rigid pavement were higher than for flexible pavement, while the maintenance and life cycle costs for rigid pavement were lower than for flexible pavement. 

An earlier motion to provide a combination of concrete and asphalt standards was defeated, 4-3. Mooney, Schultz, and Aldrich supported the motion.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:44 p.m.

Appraisal District Building

The council heard a presentation about the new office building proposed by the Brazos Central Appraisal District to address concerns with growth, security, customer service, and technology. Approval of the building is on tonight’s consent agenda.

The district’s board of directors has recommended building rather than leasing office space to give the property owners the best value for their tax dollars and to provide improved security, efficiency, and technology for staff and the public.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:12 p.m.

Itinerant Vendor Ordinance

The consensus of the council was to move ahead with new requirements related to itinerant vendors. The changes would exempt mobile medical vendors that provide infusion therapy and would allow more days per year for tent sales. 

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:12 p.m.

The mayor adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar, future agenda items, and committee reports. The regular meeting will start after a short break.

7:25 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

7:37 p.m.

Hear Visitors

Two people spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens may address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda.

  • Councilwoman Julie Schultz, speaking as a citizen, thanked Mayor Nancy Berry for her service to the community. Berry has been mayor since May 2010 and is presiding over her final council meeting tonight. She will hand the gavel to Mayor-elect Karl Mooney at the Nov. 21 council meeting.
  • Ben Roper recognized Marine Lance Cpl. Shane L. Goldman as part of the Fallen Heroes Memorial program. The 20-year-old Orange native died April 5, 2004, from injuries received from hostile fire in Al Anbar Province, Iraq.
  • Cecelia Yip, Mike Green, and Matthew Fontaine spoke in support of pickleball and encouraged the city to provide adequate facilities for the sport.

7:40 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve these consent agenda items:

  • An economic development agreement with Viasat regarding nine acres on Health Science Center Parkway.
  • A $3 million contract with Saber Power Services to modify the ring bus and relocate transformer No. 2 at the Greens Prairie Substation.
  • A $4.6 million contract with Elliott Construction for Phase 2 of the Bee Creek Sanitary Sewer Trunk Line Rehabilitation.
  • An ordinance recognizing water and sewer utility rates and surcharges established by contract.
  • An amendment to an agreement with McAlister Opportunity Fund that designates an alternate fire station site.
  • Modified the utility agreement with Brazos County MUD No. 1 to include a surcharge for water and sewer service without the charge of impact fees and other related matters.
  • A contract not to exceed $7,880 with Sungard Public Sector for adding the roadway maintenance fee to accounts in the utility billing system.
  • A resolution authorizing banners for the annual Christmas Parade.
  • A resolution approving the purchase of property and construction of a new office building by the Brazos Central Appraisal District.

This item was voted on separately:

  • By a 6-1 vote, the council approved an ordinance approving a roadway maintenance fee to help fund maintenance of city streets. Councilmen James Benham voted against the motion

Note: An inter-local agreement with Brazos County creating an economic development program was pulled from tonight’s agenda.

8:29 p.m.

Parking Removal near Fire Station No. 6

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to remove parking on one side of the streets in the neighborhood behind Fire Station No. 6. Affected streets are Payton, Banks, Pearce, Columbus, Preston, Churchill, Chappel, Pasler, Turner and Avenue B. The change was recommended to allow adequate access for emergency vehicles.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

 8:32 p.m.

Design Review Board Membership

After a public hearing, the council unanimously approved changes to membership qualifications for the Design Review Board, which is responsible for considering requests largely related to subjective matters such as alternative buffer standards and site plan design in the Wolf Pen Creek zoning district. The changes address concerns about the challenges of making appointments to the board.

The city’s Unified Development Ordinance defines membership criteria of appointees so that expertise is balanced between those with business acuity, personal experience in a design district, and general public opinion.

8:34 p.m.

Drainage Easement Abandonment

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to abandon a small public drainage easement at Holleman Drive South and Market Street to accommodate the recent development of The Junction, a multi-family project.  The property owner will maintain the existing drainage area and infrastructure.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:42 p.m.

Utility Corridor in Lick Creek Park

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to establish a public utility corridor across Lick Creek Park needed for the development of Brazos County Municipal Utility District  No. 1, also known as Southern Pointe. Since the park lies directly between Southern Pointe and the Lick Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant, the route is the only feasible option.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:42 p.m.

The council is taking a short break.

8:51 p.m.

The meeting has resumed.

9:51 p.m.

Rezoning on Earl Rudder Freeway South

After a public hearing, the council voted 5-2 to deny a request to change the zoning from Suburban Commercial to Planned Development District for about seven acres north of Raintree Drive along Earl Rudder Freeway South. Mayor Berry and Councilwoman Schultz voted for the motion.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

10:06 p.m.

Roadway Impact Fees

After a public hearing, the council voted 6-1 to approve an ordinance implementing roadway impact fees on new development, effective Dec. 1. Councilman James Benham voted against the motion. The fees are estimated to generate about $12 million in the next decade to help fund the capital costs of new roads needed to accommodate the city’s growth.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

10:17 p.m.

College Hills Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council unanimously approved a request to change the zoning from General Suburban to General Commercial for about 1.2 acres on George Bush Drive East in the College Hills Estates. The change will allow for commercial redevelopment opportunities.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

10:17 p.m.

Before adjourning, Mayor Berry noted it was her final council meeting. She thanked her fellow council members and city staff for the positive working relationship they’ve had since she was first elected in My 2010.

The council meets again on Monday, Nov. 21.


14316755_10108798313965164_2904942172107966680_nAbout the Author

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian)has been with the City of College Station since 2010. He previously served 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

5523701_l

5523701_l

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (5:30 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:

  1. Itinerant Vendor Ordinance: In the workshop, the council will discuss an itinerant vendor ordinance and requirements related to temporary outdoor sales, including mobile medical uses.
  2. Bee Creek Sewer Line: As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider a $4.6 million contract with Elliott Construction for the second of four phases of the rehabilitation of the Bee Creek Sanitary Sewer Trunk Line. The project will increase the system’s capacity to accept maximum demand at eventual build-out.
  3. Roadway Maintenance Fees: Also on the consent agenda are roadway maintenance fees dedicated to the repair and upkeep of city streets. The proposed monthly fees would be added to utility bills are $7.78 for single family, $6.10 for multi-family, and commercial fees ranging from $17.23-$250. The fees are expected to generate about $4.5 million per year.
  4. Parking Removal: After a public hearing, the council will consider removing parking on Avenue B and Payton, Banks, Pearce, Columbus, Preston, Churchill, Chappel, Pasler and Turner streets. The change would allow access for emergency vehicles.
  5. Roadway Impact Fees: After a public hearing, the council will consider approving roadway impact fees on new development to help pay the costs of building new roadways. The fees would be phased in starting in December 2017 and would in generate about $12 million in the next decade.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Ch. 19, or online. The website includes an archive of previous council meetings. We’ll post a detailed live blog on this site.

Related links:                                                                 

 


14316755_10108798313965164_2904942172107966680_nAbout the Author

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian)has been with the City of College Station since 2010. He previously served 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Oct. 27)

2014 Council

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Oct. 27. It’s not the official minutes.

The meeting is being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and streamed online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:39 p.m.

The workshop has started. Councilman James Benham is absent tonight.

5:50 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled this consent item for workshop discussion:

  • Pecan Trail Agreement with CSISD: The Inter-local agreement with the College Station Independent School District is for the district’s cost participation in the $5.4 million Greens Prairie Trail Widening Project. CSISD will reimburse the city up to $435,000 due to the impact of the proposed Pecan Trail Intermediate School, which requires the addition of deceleration lanes and a traffic signal at the Greens Prairie Trail-Ledgestone intersection.
  • Aggieland Humane Society: As part of the FY17 budget, the council approved $235,000 for services provided by the Aggieland Humane Society.
  • Riverside Parkway Resolution: The resolution supports the designation of State Highway 47 as Riverside Parkway in honor of the former western Brazos County community of Riverside. The approval of assigning a name to a state roadway lies with the Texas Department of Transportation. The proposal originated with the Brazos County Historical Commission in the fall of 2015.
  • Planning & Development Fees: The resolution adjusts application and permit fees for Planning & Development Services as discussed as part of the FY17 budget process. With development activity continuing to be strong, several new positions were recently added in Planning & Development Services to provide timely and accurate reviews and inspections. The proposed fees should offset the associated costs. The resolution has an effective date of Jan. 1 to provide adequate time to notify the development community.

6:41 p.m.

Roadway Impact Fees

The council discussed possible roadway impact fees that would be charged to new development to help pay for growth. A public hearing and formal action are scheduled for Nov. 10. If approved, the ordinance would take effect Jan. 2.

The consensus of council was to draft the ordinance around Option 2 on slide No. 5 in the PowerPoint presentation:

7;05 p.m.

Roadway Maintenance Fees

The council discussed the fee structure and exemptions for the roadway maintenance fee included in the FY17 budget.  The dedicated fee would generate about $4.5 for annual street maintenance, which respondents cited as a high priority in the 2016 citizen surveyThe fee would be assessed on monthly utility bills.

The consensus of council was to draft the ordinance around Option 1 on slide No. 5 in the PowerPoint presentation:

7:05 p.m.

The workshop has been suspended and will resume after the regular meeting, which will start after a short break.

7:16 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

7:21 p.m.

Municipal Courts Week

Mayor Nancy Berry proclaimed Nov. 7-11 as Municipal Courts Week in Texas. The proclamation recognizes the important work of municipal courts and the principle of judicial independence. Pictured below (l-r) are Customer Services Coordinator Shasi Smith (hidden), Collection Services Coordinator Lucy Coronilla, Deputy Court Clerk Sherry Brown, City Marshal Michael Lundy, Mayor Berry, Judge Ed Spillane, and Court Operations Supervisor Marie Barringer.

cs-court

7:29 p.m.

Conservationist of the Year

The Brazos Groundwater Conservation District board presented former councilman John Crompton with its conservationist of the year award. The organization services the groundwater resources of Brazos and Robertson counties.

A distinguished professor at Texas A&M, Crompton served on the city council from 2007-11 and way mayor pro tem in 2010-11. Pictured below are (l-r) are Water Services Director Dave Coleman, Water Resources Coordinator Jennifer Nations,BVGCD Board Member Judge Tom McDonald, BVGCD Board Member Dr. Bill Harris, Mayor Berry, BVGCD Board Member Alan Day, Dr. John Crompton, BVGCD Board Member David Stratta, and BVGCD Board Member Pete Brien.

cs-water

7:31 p.m.

Good Neighbor Award

The Parks & Recreation Department was recognized for receiving the Good Neighbor Award by Keep Brazos Beautiful, a local non-profit organization dedicated to keeping our community clean and green.

In February, the department joined forces with Atmos Energy to plant 47 trees in Richard Carter Park as part of a program facilitated by The Texas Trees Foundation that’s called 811 Trees. The effort helped beautify one of our most historic parks. Pictured below (l-r) are Parks & Recreation Director David Schmitz and Parks & Recreation Manager Steve Richardson.

cs-tree

7:32 p.m.

Aquatics Red Cross Awards

The Parks & Recreation Department’s Aquatics Division was recognized for receiving two Red Cross awards. The Gold Level Learn-to-Swim Provider Award is given to agencies that teach at least 1,000 children to swim.  In 2016, College Station’s Learn-to-Swim program gave more than 1,800 adults and children ages 6 months and older the opportunity to learn to swim.

The Certificate of Appreciation was given for the city’s commitment to safety, training, drowning prevention, and the certification of more than 100 people with lifesaving skills. Aquatics Supervisor Vera Solis and her staff certified 169 individuals through the Lifeguard Training Program. Pictured below (l-r) are Aquatics Supervisor Vera Solis, Parks & Recreation Manager Kelly Kelbly, Pool Manager Bridget Russell, and Water Safety Instructor Gabrielle Free.

cs-aqua

7:35 p.m.

TAAF Member City of the Year

Mark Lord, executive director of the Texas Amateur Athletic Federation, presented the organization’s Member City of the Year Award to the Parks & Recreation Department. The award recognizes the department’s efforts to promote and improve athletic programs for the TAAF as well as our residents.

The City of College Station has been associated with TAAF for more than 40 years. In recent years, the city has played host to a number of TAAF state tournaments as well as the 2014 and 2015 TAAF Summer Games of Texas. Pictured below are (l-r) Athletic Activities Assistant Ward Davis, Mayor Berry, TAAF Executive Director Mark Lord, and Recreation Supervisor Gene Ballew.

cs-taaf

7:38 p.m.

Hear Visitors

One person spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens may address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda. Ben Roper recognized Army Spc. Scott Quentin Larson as part of the Fallen Heroes Memorial program. The 22-year-old Houston native died April 5, 2004, when his convoy was ambushed in Baghdad.

7:38 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda with the exception of the economic development agreement with Viasat, which was pulled from tonight’s consent agenda and will come back at a later date.:

  • A contract B/CS Habitat for Humanity for $239,074 in HOME Investment Partnership Grant funds for the acquisition of land at 1116 Carolina and the construction of three affordable single-family homes.
  • The $124,704 purchase of replacement firewalls from Solid Borders, Inc. to protect the Electric Utilities’ Bulk Electric System (BES) cyber assets. 
  • A resolution stating that the council has reviewed and approved the city’s investment policy, broker-dealer list, and investment strategy.
  • The 2016 property tax roll of about $37 million.
  • A $309,000 contract with Jones & Carter for the final design and construction phase services for the Carters Creek Electrical Improvements Project.
  • An inter-local agreement with the College Station Independent School District for the district’s cost participation in the Greens Prairie Trail Widening Project.
  • A resolution allowing the mayor to sign an advance funding agreement with the Texas Department of Transportation for signal and pedestrian improvements on State Highway 6 at Rock Prairie Road.
  • A $358,000 contract with Jones & Carter for the final design and construction phase services of the southern portion of the Royder Road Expansion Project.
  • A resolution declaring intention to reimburse certain expenditures with proceeds from debt for Parks and Recreation, Public Works and Public Safety facility improvement projects and equipment purchases in the FY17 Capital Improvements Program Budget.
  • A resolution authorizing a $235,000 expenditure to the Aggieland Humane Society.
  • The $499,529 purchase of five variable frequency drives from The Reynolds Company to replace the existing water production units.
  • Renewal of the annual purchase contract not to exceed $150,000 with The Reynolds Company for parts and service for Water Services’ SCADA system.
  • A resolution supporting the designation of State Highway 47 as Riverside Parkway.
  • A resolution updating the fees for development applications and permits.
  • A change order of $20,174 to the contract with Proview Advanced Administrator for additional data management services, reporting services, and administration fees.

7:43 p.m.

Williams Creek Lake Estates Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted 5-0 to approve a request to rezone about 14 acres at 2242 Carll Lane, which is located northwest of the Rock Prairie Road-Fitch Parkway intersection, to allow the development of medium density single-family lots.

Councilwoman Julie Schultz recused herself from the vote.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:05 p.m.

Rezoning at Wellborn Road-Harvey Mitchell

After a public hearing, the council unanimously approved a request to rezone about 71 acres at the southeast corner of the Wellborn Road-Harvey Mitchell Parkway intersection. The change would allow the development of townhomes, duplexes, and apartments as well as commercial uses.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:09 p.m.

Deacon Drive West Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted 5-0 to approve a request to rezone about 24 acres located south of Deacon Drive West and east of Holleman Drive South to allow the development of townhomes. Councilwoman Julie Schultz recused herself from the vote.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

9:07 p.m.

Comp Plan Amendment – Bicycle, Pedestrian, and Greenways

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve the realignment of Royder Road to Wellborn Road, but to delay additional changes to  the city’s Comprehensive Plan regarding transportation facilities in the Wellborn area. Council asked staff to gather more feedback from area residents about the other recommended changes. 

A motion to deny the recommended updates was defeated, 4-2. Councilman Steve Aldrich and Councilwoman Blanche Brick supported the motion.

A motion to delay the recommended updates until early January was defeated, 4-2. Aldrich and Brick supported the motion.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

9:07 p.m.

The council is taking a short break.

9:14 p.m.

The meeting has resumed.

9:20 p.m.

Highway 30 Land Use near Veterans Park

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the land use designation for about seven acres of Highway 30 frontage across from Veterans Park and Athletic Complex to allow for commercial development.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

9:25 p.m.

Highway 30 Rezoning Near Veterans Park

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the zoning for about seven acres of Highway 30 frontage across from Veterans Park and Athletic Complex to allow for commercial development.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

9:31 p.m.

Highway 6 Lane Use North of Fitch

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to change the land use designation for about 58 acres north of Fitch Parkway on the east side of Highway 6 to allow for commercial development.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

9:32 p.m.

Highway 6 Rezoning North of Fitch

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to rezone about 58 acres north of Fitch Parkway on the east side of Highway 6 to allow for commercial development.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

9:32 p.m.

The mayor adjourned the regular meeting. The workshop meeting will resume. 

9:39 p.m.

The mayor adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar, future agenda items, and committee reports.

The council meets again on Thursday, Nov. 10.


Colin KillianAbout the Author

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian)has been with the City of College Station since 2010. He previously served 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

5523701_l

5523701_l

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (about 5:30 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:

  1. Roadway Impact Fees: In the workshop, the council will continue its recent discussions about possible roadway impact fees that would be charged to new development to help pay for growth. A public hearing and formal action are scheduled for Nov. 10.
  2. Roadway Maintenance Fee: The council will have a workshop discussion on a draft ordinance and options for the roadway maintenance fee that’s included in the FY17 budget.
  3. Rezoning at Wellborn Road-Harvey Mitchell: After a public hearing, the council will consider a request to rezone about 71 acres at the southeast corner of the Wellborn Road-Harvey Mitchell Parkway intersection. The change would allow for the development of townhomes, duplexes, and apartments as well as commercial uses.
  4. Highway 30 Rezoning near Veterans Park: After public hearings, the council will consider changing the land use and zoning designations for about seven acres of Highway 30 frontage across from Veterans Park and Athletic Complex. The changes would allow for commercial development.
  5. Highway 6 Rezoning north of Fitch: After a public hearing, the council will consider a request to rezone about 58 acres north of Fitch Parkway on the east side of Highway 6. The change would allow for commercial development.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Ch. 19, or online. The website includes an archive of previous council meetings. We’ll post a detailed live blog on this site.

Related links:                                                                 

 


14316755_10108798313965164_2904942172107966680_nAbout the Author

@ColinKillian has been with the City of College Station since 2010. He previously served 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Oct. 13)

2014 Council

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Oct. 13. It’s not the official minutes.

The meeting is being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and streamed online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:20 p.m.

The workshop has started.

5:55 p.m.

Legislative Update

The council received a legislative update and a preview of the upcoming session of the Texas Legislature.  

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:07 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled this consent item for workshop discussion:

  • College View School Zone: The proposed 30 mph school zone would be near the new College View High School. It will extend from 200 feet east of Holik Street to about 175 feet west of Timber Street. The zone also extends south along Timber about 160 feet from the intersection with George Bush Drive and north along Bizzell Street about 100 feet from the intersection. Holik Street will also have the 30 mph zone from the end of the existing zone to the intersection with Bush. Texas A&M has given the city permission to install and maintain a flashing beacon on Bizzell to notify motorists coming from campus that they are about to enter a school zone.
  • RVP Funding Agreement: As part of the FY17 budget process, the council approved $350,000 from the general fund for the operations and maintenance of the Research Valley Partnership. Councilman James Benham reiterated his opposition to funding the RVP.
  • ESRI Agreement: The ESRI Small Government Enterprise Licenses Agreement allows the city to use most ESRI products without limits on the number of licenses. The three-year contract has an annual cost of $50,000 and saves money when compared to acquiring the appropriate number of individual licenses and paying for annual maintenance and support agreements.
  • Chamber of Commerce Funding: The Bryan/College Station Chamber of Commerce will receive $25,000 in hotel tax funds in FY17. Councilman Benham thanked retiring executive director Royce Hickman for his service.

7:20 p.m.

Roadway Impact Fees

The council discussed the Impact Fee Advisory Committee’s written comments about possible roadway impact fees and heard an update on the process for implementation.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:20 p.m.

The mayor suspended the workshop until after the regular meeting, which will begin momentarily.

7:31 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

7:34

Hear Visitors

One person spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens may address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda. Ben Roper recognized Army Spc. Robert Asiaga as part of the Fallen Heroes Memorial program.

7:38 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • A $179,760.87 change order for the contract with L.E. Myers Company for additional matting and track equipment due to extreme wet weather conditions on the Spring Creek transmission line upgrade project.
  • A contract not to exceed $750,000 with McCord Engineering for electric engineering services related to the design of the Graham Road Substation.
  • The second renewal of a blanket price agreement not to exceed $136,992 with Cleveland Asphalt Products for emulsified asphalt products for street maintenance. 
  • Renewal of a one-year contract not to exceed $200,000 with Rios Tree Service for landscaping, tree trimming and removal services.
  • A 30 mph school zone on George Bush Drive, Timber Street, Holik Street and Bizzell Street near the new College View High School.
  • Annual water meter purchases of $166,077.52 from Aqua Metric Sales through the Houston-Galveston Area Council contract.
  • The first of two renewal options for the annual EMS supply purchase order not to exceed $80,000 with Boundtree Medical L.L.C.
  • An FY17 funding agreement for $15,000 with the College Station Noon Lions Club.
  • The FY17 budget, a general fund funding agreement for $35,000, and a hotel tax fund funding agreement for $91,000 with the Arts Council of the Brazos Valley.
  • FY17 hotel tax affiliate funding and a marketing and public arts support funding agreement for $391,900 with the Arts Council of the Brazos Valley.
  • A FY17 funding agreement for $51,190 with Keep Brazos Beautiful.
  • The FY17 budget and a hotel tax funding agreement for $25,000 with the Memorial for all Veterans of the Brazos Valley.
  • The FY17 budget and a hotel tax funding agreement for $2,122,616 with the Bryan-College Station Convention and Visitors Bureau.
  • The FY17 budget a hotel tax funding agreement for $25,000 with the Bryan/College
  • Station Chamber of Commerce.
  • The FY17 budget and a funding agreement for $102,690 with Easterwood Airport.
  • A FY17 hotel tax grant program funding agreement of $400,000 with the Brazos Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau.
  • A $150,000, three-year Small Government Enterprise ArcGIS License agreement with ESRI.

The council voted separately on this consent item:

  • By a 6-1 vote approved a FY17 general fund funding agreement for $350,000 with the Research Valley Partnership. Councilman Benham voted against the motion.

8:06 p.m.

Capstone-Barron Realignment

The council voted unanimously to move forward with the reconstruction and alignment of Capstone Drive and Barron Road from Fitch Parkway through Wellborn Road. Barron and Capstone will be realigned to intersect Wellborn Road, and the existing asphalt road will be replaced with concrete.

The $5.6 million project was approved in the FY16 city budget and was among the projects recommended by the 2015 Citizen Advisory Committee.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:09 p.m.

Capstone-Barron Project Easements and Right-of-Way

The council voted unanimously to authorize city staff to negotiate the purchase of right-of-way and easements for the Capstone-Barron Realignment Project.

8:14 p.m.

Wellborn SUD Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the zoning from Rural to Wellborn Commercial for the Wellborn Special Utility District office, which is located on three acres northeast of the Greens Prairie Road West-Live Oak Street intersection.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:29 p.m.

Tarrow Townhomes Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the zoning from Office to Planned Development District for about 1.6 acres at the intersection of Tarrow Street and Autumn Circle. The change will allow the development of townhouses.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:32 p.m.

Parking Removal on Louise and Second Street

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to remove parking along one side of the 300 block of Louise Street and the 400 block of Second Street to allow aerial fire department access to the proposed Louise Townhomes development.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:35 p.m.

Easement Abandonment at A&M Church of Christ

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to abandon part of a public utility easement on the A&M Church of Christ property at 2475 Rudder Freeway.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

10:01 p.m.

Northgate Mobile Food Court

The council voted 5-2 to approve a conditional use permit for a long-term mobile food court at 203 First Street in the Northgate District. Beer and wine sales must cease at midnight and a minimum of two security officers must be provided from 10 p.m.-3 a.m. on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays. 

Councilmen Steve Aldrich and Karl Mooney voted against the motion.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

10:01 p.m.

The council is taking a short break.

10:07 p.m.

The meeting has resumed.

10:09 p.m.

Easement Abandonment at School Sites

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to abandon part of a public utility easement near the Willow Branch and Oakwood school sites.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

10:11 p.m.

Summit Crossing Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the zoning from Planned Development District to Townhouse for about 14.6 acres north of Harvey Road and west of FM 158. The change will allow the continuation of the existing Summit Crossing townhouse development.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

10:13 p.m.

Easement Abandonment on Redmond Drive

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to abandon a public utility easement to accommodate the design of a residential development on Redmond Drive.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

10:14 p.m.

BioCorridor Board Appointment

The council voted unanimously to appoint Johnny Burns to replace Barry Moore as one of the Planning & Zoning Commission’s representatives on the BioCorridor Board. Moore resigned to run for city council.

10:15 p.m.

BVSWMA Board Appointment

The council voted 6-0 to appoint Mayor Pro Tem John Nichols to the BVSWMA, Inc. Board of Directors. Nichols abstained. Mayor Nancy Berry’s term on the board expired Sept. 30.

10:15 p.m.

The mayor adjourned the regular meeting. The workshop meeting will resume.

10:18 p.m.

The mayor adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar, future agenda items, and committee reports.

The council meets again on Thursday, Oct. 27.


14316755_10108798313965164_2904942172107966680_nAbout the Author

@ColinKillian has been with the City of College Station since 2010. He previously served 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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