Posts tagged “Parks and Recreation

Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Dec. 13)

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Dec. 13. It’s not the official minutes.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink channel 19 or online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:03 p.m.

The workshop has started. The council took no action from executive session.

Earlier this afternoon, the council recognized the city’s employee of the year along with employees reaching 20, 25, 30 and 35 years of service.

5:28 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled these consent items for workshop discussion:

  • Dog Leashes at Lick Creek Park: The ordinance would remove the Lick Creek Park exception to the city’s dog leash requirement and add a designated leash-free area.
  • Lick Creek Park Shade Structure: The $139,516 shade structure over the amphitheater at Lick Creek Park would provide protection from the elements. The cost includes installation. 
  • Water Line along Greens Prairie and Arrington: The $81,089 oversized participation request is to increase the size of about 5,272 linear feet of water line from an 8-inch to a 12-inch line. The line ties into an existing 12-inch line on the south side of Greens Prairie Road West and extends west and south through the Greens Prairie Reserve subdivision and through the Phase 101 area. 
  • Water Line through Greens Prairie Preserve: The $25,251 oversized participation request is to increase the size of about 1,786 linear feet of water line from an 8-inch to a 12-inch line. The line extends through the Phase 102 area and ties into the proposed 12-inch lines to the north and south being installed with Greens Prairie Reserve Phase 101. 
  • Gasoline and Diesel Fuel: The $1.4 million contract has firm fixed prices for profit and delivery, allowing the city to pay costs (which fluctuates) plus markup. The estimated expenditures are based on past fuel usage and expenses.
  • Impact Fees Semi-Annual Report: The report documents the fees collected in the service areas. The city adopted system-wide impact fees for water, wastewater, and roadways in late 2016. Fee implementation occurred in phases with full implementation occurring this month.

5:50 p.m.

Legislative Update and Preview

Legislative Consultant Jennifer Rodriguez provided the council with a legislative update and a preview of the 86th Texas State Legislature.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:11 p.m.

Parks & Recreation Needs Assessment

The council received and discussed the results of the recent Parks & Recreation Needs Assessment survey conducted from Oct. 17-Nov. 16 by National Service Research.

The city will use the survey to assess and prioritize parks and recreation services and needs. 

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:23 p.m.

Veteran’s Park Field Naming

The council discussed the naming of the new artificial turf fields at Veterans Park and Athletic Complex. 

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:30 p.m.

Mayor Karl Mooney adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar and received committee reports. The regular meeting will start after a short break.

6:40 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

6:46 p.m.

Hear Visitors

One person spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens might address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda.

  • James Benham recognized PFC Larry Isaiah Guyton as part of the Fallen Heroes Memorial program. The 22-year-old Brenham native died in May of 2007 after a bomb detonated near his vehicle during combat in Iraq. 

7:02 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve these consent agenda items:

  • The $104,674.25 purchase of five police motorcycles from The Ranch Harley Davidson. The action also includes a $4,590 one-year extended warranty and the $30,000 trade-in of five 2015 motorcycles.
  • Removal of the Lick Creek Park exception to the dog leash requirement in the city’s Code or Ordinances and added a designated leash-free area.
  • Authorized the city manager to approve and execute employee benefits contract documents and expenditures related to the employee benefits contracts provided that such expenditures are appropriated from available funds approved from the annual budget and consistent with state and local laws. The action also renewed the city’s contract with Cigna for stop-loss reinsurance for 2019.
  • A $1.23 million contract with Binkley & Barfield for engineering services related to the design of the Greens Prairie Widening Project.
  • A $104,671 contract with Gessner Engineering for construction materials testing for the new police headquarters.
  • An $81,089 oversized participation agreement that upsizes about 5,272 linear feet of water line from an 8-inch to a 12-inch line along Greens Prairie Road and Arrington Road.
  • A $25,251 oversized participation agreement that upsizes about 1,786 linear feet of water line from an 8-inch to a 12-inch line through Greens Prairie Reserve.
  • Renewal of a contract not to exceed $250,000 for pavement markings and roadway striping.
  • Extended for one year a $1.4 million contract with Brenco Marketing Corporation for gasoline and diesel fuel.
  • The semi-annual report on system-wide impact fees for water, wastewater, and roadways.

This item was voted on separately:

  • The council voted unanimously to approve a $139,516 contract with USA Shade & Fabric Structures for a cantilevered shade structure for the Lick Creek Park amphitheater. The contract includes installation.

7:37 p.m.

Rezoning North of Emerald Forest

After a public hearing, the council unanimously approved a request to change the zoning from Rural to Restricted Suburban and Natural Areas Protected for about 46 acres near North Forest Parkway north of the Emerald Forest Subdivision. The change will allow for residential development similar to the existing area.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentations:

7:41 p.m.

The council discussed and reviewed future agenda items.

7:41 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the meeting.

The council meets again next Wednesday to canvass the votes from Tuesday’s run-off election, and  Dennis Maloney will take the oath of office as the Place 6 councilman. The council’s next full-agenda meeting is Thursday, Jan. 10.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

 


About the Blogger

Public Communications Manager Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the city since 2010 after 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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New programs help teens discover their passions

By Hallie Hutchins, Parks & Recreation Marketing Assistant

The teen years can be rough. It’s all about self-discovery and trying out new things.

Positive, stress-free activities at the end of the school day can help teens discover their interests and passions. Two new programs offered by the College Station Parks and Recreation Department can lend a hand.

Teen Night After School at the Lincoln Recreation Center provides an all-inclusive, safe space for teens 14-18 years old to spend time with friends, get help with homework, and enjoy sports, board games, foosball, pool, and video games. Computers and free wi-fi are also available.

Teen Nights are every Monday-Thursday from 6:30-8:30 p.m. through Dec. 20. Membership is $45 a semester.

The fun continues on Fridays from 10 p.m.-midnight with 5th Quarter when teens can gather at the Lincoln Recreation Center to play basketball, dodgeball, volleyball, board games, ping pong, foosball, or pool. Light refreshments are also available at no charge.

Scheduled dates for the 5th Quarter are Sept. 28, Oct. 12, Oct. 26, and Nov. 2.  The cost is $3 per night or free with an after-school membership.

These new programs will encourage teens to interact in a safe and supervised social environment that promotes healthy lifestyle skills.

For more information, visit cstx.gov/LincolnCenter or call 979.764.3779.

 


About the Blogger

Hallie Hutchins is in her fourth year as marketing staff assistant in the Parks & Recreation Department after graduating from Texas A&M in 2014 with a degree in sports management. She has previously worked with the Dallas Sidekicks professional soccer team and Texas Team Junior Golf. Originally from White Oak, Hallie also attended Kilgore College and was a member of the famed Kilgore Rangerettes dance team.


 

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Competitive spirit attracts 400 senior athletes to town

By Kelli Nesbitt, Parks & Recreation Marketing Coordinator

The competitive hearts of athletes have been on full display this month at the Winter Olympic Games in South Korea. Watching on television is a thrill, but witnessing the competition in person must be spectacular.

While we can’t offer the Olympics, we can offer the same spirit of competition at the College Station Senior Games Friday through Sunday at venues across our community. Admission is free.

A total of 410 athletes between the ages of 49-93 are competing, including 339 out-of-towners and 156 women. A total of 198 volunteers — mostly Texas A&M students — will help us orchestrate the event.

Notable Participants

  • Swimmer Baker Lee Shannon of Houston is the oldest male athlete at the age of 93 years and nine months. He is competing in the 50 backstroke, 50 breaststroke, 50 freestyle and 100 freestyle.
  • Distance runner Barbara Chenette of Crockett is the oldest female athlete at the age of 83 years and three months. She is competing in the 5K.
  • Track & field athlete Michael McDavid of Buchanan Dam is competing in the most events at 13, including the discus, shot put, javelin, long jump, high jump, 50m, 3000m RW, 100m, 800m, 200m, 1500m RW, 400m, 1500m.
  • Frank Hershman of Surrey, British Columbia traveled 2,364 miles to compete. Other out-of-state athletes represent Louisiana and Minnesota.
  • Former Olympian Jim Gerhardt of Houston is competing in his fourth Brazos Valley Senior Games. He placed 11th in the triple jump at the 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki, Finland. Gerhardt will participate in the discus, hammer throw, javelin, and shot put.

Participants by Sport

13

5K Road Race

3

10K Road Race

4 teams

Basketball

12

Free Throws

13

Basketball Skills

55

Bowling

31

Cornhole

68

Cycling

11

Disc Golf

17

Golf

124

Pickleball

23

Swimming

15

Table Tennis

90

Track & Field

15

Tennis

The College Station Senior Games couldn’t happen without our generous sponsors. We offer our sincere thanks to Brazos Valley EMS, Integrity Urgent Care, Lifespan Cognitive & Motor Neuroimaging Laboratory, Center for Translational Research in Aging & Longevity, Center for Population Health and Aging, Area Agency on Aging, Piranha Fitness and Mad Taco.

As we age, many of us are content to spectate rather than participate. But for some, an innate desire for competition doesn’t allow them to surrender to time. We invite you to check out the action for yourself!

For more information, visit cstx.gov/seniorgames or call 979-764-3486.


About the Blogger

Kelli Nesbitt (@kneztalk) has worked for the Parks & Recreation Department for 14 years, the last seven as marketing coordinator. A native of Bryan, Kelli earned a bachelor’s degree in health & kinesiology from Sam Houston State.


 

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Celebrate love month with Trail of Lights, Date Night

By Margie Trame, Assistant Recreation Supervisor

Valentine’s Day is when we celebrate the things we love about those who matter most. While valentine’s cards, flowers, and chocolate are always a safe bet on the day of love, experiences are infinitely more valuable.

And why limit it to just one day?

Throughout February, Wolf Pen Creek Park’s upper trails are a romantic pathway of lights to help you extend the warm glow of Valentine’s Day. The Trail of Lights begins at the Holleman Drive entrance, crosses over the bridge, and ends at the gazebo next to the creek.

The lover’s lane of lights is open from 6-10 p.m. daily.

Join us on Valentine’s Day (Wednesday, Feb. 14) from 6-9 p.m for the free Trail of Lights Date Night. Enjoy live music, carriage rides, sweet treats, flowers, and the beautiful Trail of Lights with friends, family or your significant other.

Ditch the fancy dinner this year and picnic in the park. You may also bring refreshments, but glass containers are not allowed, and coolers must be 48 quarts or smaller. Satisfy your sweet tooth with chocolate-dipped strawberries and indulge in desserts from local food trucks including Donut Darlin’, 1541 Pastries & Coffee, and Boots Beverages.

While admission and activities are free, the food truck prices will vary.

The carriage rides will be on the festival site, and all other activities and booths will be at the Wolf Pen Creek Amphitheater. Parking is available at the Wolf Pen Creek parking lot on Colgate Drive, the Arts Council building on Dartmouth Street, and at Post Oak Mall.

Pets are welcome, too, so don’t forget about the furry friends you love.

 


About the Blogger

Assistant Recreation Supervisor Margie Trame (@choochootrame) is in her first year with the Parks & Recreation Department. A native of Arlington, she’s pursuing a degree in Recreation, Parks and Tourism Sciences at Texas A&M.


 

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Feed your hunger to compete at the 2018 Senior Games

By Gabby Salazar, Tourism Events Supervisor

When you used to think of senior citizens, you probably pictured older adults who were largely inactive, at least in a physical sense. But as the baby boom generation has grown older, that stereotype has changed significantly.

More of today’s seniors tend to be active, social, and vibrant folks who still enjoy physical activities and competition.

The College Station Senior Games was created for these not-so-over-the-hill competitors, offering athletes 50 years-and-older a choice of 14 activities at venues throughout our community. The 2018 games are set for Feb. 23-25, and the registration deadline is Feb. 12.

Events include track and field, swimming, cycling, golf, 5K run, 10K run, bowling, pickleball, disc golf, table tennis, tennis, 3-on-3 basketball, cornhole, and basketball skills. We’re also introducing a recumbent division to the cycling event.

Participants compete in nine age divisions, with team sports divided into three age brackets. Partner and team groups are determined by the age of the youngest partner or team member.

The $30 participation fee includes a shirt and two reception tickets with an additional fee per event. For more information and to register, go to cstx.gov/SeniorGames.

At the age of 91 years and nine months, swimmer Baker Lee Shannon of Houston was the oldest male athlete in 2017. Baker competed in the 50-meter backstroke, 50-meter breaststroke, 50-meter freestyle, and 100-meter freestyle. Barbara Chenette of Crockett competed in the 5K run and was the oldest female athlete at the age of 81 years and three months.

Photos: A Look back at the 2017 Senior Games

The College Station Senior Games have developed into a respected event that attracts hundreds of participants from as far away as Los Angeles. The success of the local games has even led to our Parks & Recreation Department being named to the state and national senior games board of directors.

If you’re over 50 and still yearn to engage in spirited competition, sign up for the College Station Senior Games today!

 


About the Blogger

Tourism Events Supervisor Gabby Salazar is in her third year with the City of College Station. Before joining the city staff, she was the night manager at Texas A&M’s Reed Arena. A product of A&M’s sports management program, Gabby earned her bachelor’s degree in 2014 and is working toward her master’s. A native of Alamo, she was also a member of the Aggies’ nationally-ranked track and cross country teams.


 

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Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Jan. 25)

(L-R): Bob Brick, Linda Harvell, Jerome Rektorik, Karl Mooney (mayor), John Nichols, Barry Moore, James Benham.

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Jan. 25. It’s not the official minutes.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink channel 19 or online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:03 p.m.

The workshop has started. No action was taken out of executive session.

5:21 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled these consent items for workshop discussion:

  • Annexation Plan: The proposed ordinance directs staff to prepare a service plan for the area west of College Station identified for annexation. The service plan will contain the details related to the provision of specific municipal services to the property upon annexation and must be complete and available for public inspection before the public hearings. The ordinance also establishes the two required public hearings: March 19 at 6 p.m. and March 22 at 6 p.m., both at city hall. A fiscal impact analysis will be performed as part of the annexation process. 
  • Water Oversize Participation: The city is requesting construction of an 18-inch water transmission line associated with the development of the Brazos Valley Auto Complex. The developer’s engineer demonstrated that a 12-inch water line was adequate for the proposed development. The agreement covers the difference in cost between the 12-inch water line and the 18-inch water line along State Highway 6 South. A total of $149,805.60 is recommended for this project from the Water Capital Improvement Projects Fund.
  • Pershing Point Parking Removal: The proposed ordinance removes on-street parking on the north side of Hayes Lane from the intersection with Towers Parkway west to Papa Bear Drive, on both sides of Regiment Way, and on the north and west sides of Papa Bear Drive from the intersection with Towers Parkway and extending west and south to 120 feet southwest of the intersection with Hayes Lane. The developer of the Pershing Pointe Villas subdivision chose to construct a standard-width residential street and remove some on-street parking to comply with the Unified Development Ordinance. No parking signs were installed when the roads were built. 
  • Summit Crossing Parking Removal: The proposed ordinance removes on-street parking on the north side of Alamosa Street between Summit Crossing Lane and Dakota Lane, on the south side of Buena Vista between Summit Crossing Lane and Dakota Lane, on the east side of Dakota Lane between Alamosa Street and Buena Vista, and on both sides of the public alley between Alamosa Street and Buena Vista. The developer of the Summit Crossing subdivision chose to construct a standard-width residential street and remove some on-street parking to comply with the Unified Development Ordinance.No parking signs were installed when the roads were built. 
  • Holleman South Widening: The $9.44 million project will reconstruct Holleman from North Dowling to Rock Prairie Road West. Improvements include replacing the two-lane asphalt pavement with a four-lane concrete section, a median/center turn lane, curbs, gutters an underground storm sewer, a sidewalk on the west side, and a multi-use path on the east side. The project also includes the installation of a traffic signal at Rock Prairie West and the new elementary school entrance, as well as illumination along the corridor.

5:38 p.m.

Historic Preservation Committee

The council reviewed the Historic Preservation Committee’s annual report.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

5:42 p.m.

Procurement Card Program Audit

The council received the results of an audit of the city’s procurement card program, which found the city is mitigating risk, encouraging the efficient and effective use of procurement cards, and achieving the program’s objectives. The report said some controls could be strengthened to further reduce risk. For the full document, go to pages 7-23 in tonight’s workshop packet.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:47 p.m.

Neighborhood Conservation Overlay Districts

The council discussed providing additional flexibility in single-family Neighborhood Conservation Overlay districts.

Overlay districts are designed to provide additional standards for new construction and redevelopment in established neighborhoods to promote development that is compatible with the neighborhood’s existing character. A primary goal is to balance the need for the renewal of vacant or underused properties.

Planning and Development Services Staff is working with the Southside neighborhood on an application to form an NCO District for the College Park, Oakwood, and Dulaney neighborhoods. The neighborhoods feel the Unified Development Ordinance language governing NCO options are overly restrictive and rigid and asked for additional flexibility to allow more customization to better target neighborhood issues without overregulating other areas.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:56 p.m.

Arts Council Building Renovation

The council discussed the renovation of the Arts Council building on Colgate Drive and its use as a community center that emphasizes senior programming. The $973,000 project includes reconfiguring the layout to better accommodate community activities, addressing ADA issues, and replacing the HVAC.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:56 p.m.

Mayor Mooney suspended the workshop until after the regular meeting, which will begin after a short break.

7:07 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

7:13 p.m.

Historical Marker Presentations

Two historic markers were presented by College Station’s Historic Preservation Committee.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

Plaque No. 92 will be placed on the home at 700 Thomas, which is owned by Jim and Stephanie Russ. This home, built in 1953, is the former residence of Dr. O.D. Butler and his family. The late Dr. Butler was a legendary figure in the history of Texas A&M through his leadership in agriculture. The Russes are pictured with Mayor Mooney and HPC Chairman Lou Hodges.

Plaque No. 93 will be placed on the home at 601 Montclair, which is owned by Jeff and Brenda Hood. This home — likely built by members of Texas A&M’s Corps of Cadets in 1910 or 1911 — is among the original faculty homes to have been moved from campus into a nearby neighborhood. Pictured below with Mayor Mooney and Chairman  Hodges is resident Paul Dutton.

7:16 p.m.

Hear Visitors

One person spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens might address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda.

  • Councilman James Benham recognized Army Sgt. Glenn D. Hicks, Jr. as part of the Fallen Heroes Memorial program. The 24-year-old College Station native died April 28, 2007, when he was struck with an improvised explosive device and small arms fire during combat operations in Salman Park, Iraq.

7:17 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • A $560,900 contract to JaCody Construction to purchase and replace screw lift pumps at the Carters Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant.
  • A change order decreasing by $52,182 a contract with McDonald Municipal & Industrial. The new contract total is $1,074,287.
  • The second reading of a franchise agreement with Brazos Valley Recycling for the collection of recyclables from commercial businesses and multi-family locations.
  • Annual tire purchases and retread services not to exceed $230,000 from Southern Tire Mart through the BuyBoard Purchasing Cooperative.
  • An annual blanket purchase order not to exceed $120,000 with Siddons-Martin Emergency Group for repair parts and labor for fire trucks through the BuyBoard Purchasing Cooperative.
  • An ordinance directing staff to prepare a service plan and establish public hearing dates and times for the annexation of about 65 acres on the city’s west side.
  • A $149,805.60 oversize participation agreement with Bkck Ltd. for a new water main along State Highway 6 South near its intersection with Sebesta Road.
  • Removed parking on the north side of Hayes Lane from the intersection with Towers Parkway west to Papa Bear Drive, on both sides of Regiment Way, and on the north and west sides of Papa Bear Drive from the intersection with Towers Parkway extending west and south to 120 feet southwest of the intersection with Hayes Lane.
  • Removed parking on the north side of Alamosa Street between Summit Crossing Lane and Dakota Lane, on the south side of Buena Vista between Summit Crossing Lane and Dakota Lane, on the east side of Dakota Lane between Alamosa Street and Buena Vista, and on both sides of the public alley between Alamosa Street and Buena Vista.
  • A $9.44 million contract with Larry Young Paving for the construction of the Holleman Drive South Widening Project.
  • A resolution for the Strong and Sustainable Grant Program that repeals a previous resolution and delegates authority to the city manager to administer and implement the program policy.

7:45 p.m.

Rezoning in 200 Block of Holleman

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the zoning district boundaries to Planned Development District for about 5.6 acres in the 200 block of Holleman Drive in the Pooh’s Park Subdivision. The change will allow the development of 62 detached townhouses designed for students.

Here are the PowerPoint presentations:

8:44 p.m.

Land Use at Rock Prairie and Fitch

After a public hearing, the council voted 5-2 to deny a request to change the land use designation to General Commercial and Natural Areas Reserved for about 35 acres north of the intersection of Rock Prairie Road and William D. Fitch Parkway. Councilmen Jerome Rektoik and Barry Moore voted against the motion.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

9:56 p.m.

Rezoning on Greens Prairie Road West

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the zoning district boundaries to Planned Development District for about eight acres at 3596 Greens Prairie Road West. The change will allow the development of senior assisted-living housing that looks similar to nearby homes.

Here are the PowerPoint presentations:

9:57 p.m.

Parks & Recreation Board Appointment

The council voted unanimously to reappoint Ann Hays to another term on the Parks & Recreation Board.

9:59 p.m.

The council discussed and reviewed future agenda items.

9:59 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the regular meeting and will resume the workshop.

10:00 p.m.

The council discussed its calendar and received committee reports.

10:00 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the workshop. The council meets again on Thursday, Feb. 8.

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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