Posts tagged “Fix a Leak Week

Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (March 14)

Sitting (L-R): Mayor Pro Tem Linda Harvell, Mayor Karl Mooney, Eleanor Vessali. Standing (L-R): Bob Brick, Jerome Rektorik, John Nichols, Dennis Maloney.

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, March 14. It’s not the official minutes.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink channel 19 or online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:23 p.m.

The workshop has started. The council took no action out of the executive session.

5:36 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled these consent items for workshop discussion:

  • Carter, Thomas Park Improvements: The $177,000 contract cover sidewalk repairs at Richard Carter Park and new shelter roofs at Carter and Thomas Parks.
  • Fleet Management System: The $128,000 contract with FASTER Asset Solutions is for a fleet management system for Public Works. The department’s existing system is nearing the end of its service life.
  • Fiber Optic Lease Agreement: This item is the second amendment to the original lease with to the CEO Etc. and will add an additional 2.44 fiber strand miles.
  • Crow Memorial Parkway: The resolution would support Rep. John Raney’s efforts to designate part of Texas Avenue between Villa Maria Road in Bryan and Krenek Tap Road in College Station as the Carolyn and John David Crow Memorial Parkway. It is a designation, not a renaming so addresses along the route will not change. Crow won the Heisman Trophy as the nation’s outstanding college football player in 1957. 
  • FY19 Fee Resolution: The resolution updates the fees, rates, and charges for Planning and Development Services, which are indexed to the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers, as well as certain Parks and Recreation fees for services that will occur this fiscal year.
  • Mutual Termination of ILA with CSISD: Since the city no longer plans to construct a fire station at the location anticipated in the 2010 inter-local agreement — and the school district wants to use the land for other uses — the parties have mutually agreed to terminate the ILA.

5:46 p.m.

Annual Audit Reports and CAFR

The council unanimously accepted the city’s annual independent audit reports and Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for the FY18 fiscal year, which ended Sept. 30.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:20 p.m.

Parkland Dedication Audit Report

The council reviewed the city internal auditor’s Parkland Dedication Report.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:23 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar and received committee reports. The regular meeting will start after a short break.

6:31 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

6:36 p.m.

Legion Fields

Mayor Mooney presented a proclamation to the American Legion recognizing Legion Fields as the official name of a group of fields at Veterans Park and Athletic Complex. Members of the local American Legion joined the mayor for the presentation (below).

6:40 p.m.

Fix a Leak Week

The mayor proclaimed March 18-24 as Fix a Leak Week as part of the Environmental Protection Agency’s water conservation efforts. Joining the mayor was Water Resource Coordinator Jennifer Nations (below).

6:55 p.m.

Hear Visitors

?? people spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens might address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda.

  • Councilwoman Elianor Vessali recognized Army Sgt. Maj. Julio C. Ordonez as part of The American Fallen Soldiers Project. The 54-year-old San Antonio native died with six others in a helicopter crash on Sept. 17, 2008, near Tallil, Iraq.
  • Jim Elmquist asked the city to seek opinions from outside experts about the leakage problems at Thomas Pool.
  • Fred Dupriest encouraged city leadership to listen to neighborhoods that want to change development rules.
  • Mary Hirsch spoke against designating part of Texas Avenue the Carolyn and John David Crow Memorial Parkway.

7:01 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve these consent agenda items:

  • A $177,000 contract with Jamail and Smith Construction for improvements to Richard Carter Park and Thomas Park.
  • A $128,000 contract with FASTER Asset Solutions for a fleet management system for the Public Works Department.
  • The second amendment to the lease agreement with CEO Etc. for the lease of city fiber optic cable facilities.
  • An update to the fees, rates, and charges in the city’s Code of Ordinances.
  • An amendment to the city’s Code of Ordinances related to plumbing fees.
  • The mutual termination of an inter-local agreement with the College Station Independent School District regarding land that will no longer be used for a future fire station.

The council voted 6-1 to postpone until April 11 action supporting state legislation that would designate part of Texas Avenue as the Carolyn and John David Crow Memorial Parkway. Mayor Mooney voted against the motion.

7:13 p.m.

Fee in Lieu of Sidewalk Construction

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a change in the city’s Unified Development Ordinance to streamline the approval of sidewalk fees in lieu of construction in the platting process.

The change means the administrator will approve the requests instead of the Planning and Zoning Commission and will allow preliminary plans to be approved faster.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:27 p.m.

Bald Prairie Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the zoning from Rural to General Suburban for about 1.5 acres between Victoria Avenue and Renee Lane near Barron Road. The change allows the development of two single-family residential lots.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:55 p.m.

Boomtown Barbeque

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to amend the Planned Development District on a half-acre at 3125 Texas Avenue South near Deacon Drive to allow the development of a drive-thru Boomtown Barbeque restaurant. The property is located northwest of the existing Burger King.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:00 p.m.

Lick Creek Public Utility Corridors

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to authorize the establishment of public utility corridors for the Lick Creek Wastewater Trunk Line Project in certain parkland sections located south of Fitch Parkway, east of Pebble Creek Parkway and west of Rock Prairie Road. The action allows the city to build a 48-inch and 54-inch sanitary sewer trunk line from Fitch to the Lick Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:04 p.m.

Concrete, Curb, Gutter and Flatwork Contract

The council voted unanimously to approve a contract not to exceed $2.9 million with Larry Young Paving for annual concrete curb, gutter, and flatwork installation to maintain city infrastructure.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:07 p.m.

After the council discussed and reviewed future agenda items, Mayor Mooney adjourned the meeting. The council meets again on Thursday, March 28.

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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3 steps to Fix a Leak and save money

 

By Jennifer Nations, Water Resource Coordinator

More than one trillion gallons of water from easy-to-fix leaks are wasted in U.S. homes each year. That’s why the City of College Station is joining with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to encourage you to find and fix leaks during this week’s annual Fix a Leak Week.

Sponsored by the EPA’s WaterSense program, Fix a Leak Week can help you improve the water efficiency of your home by finding and repairing leaks. In an average home, leaks waste more than 10,000 gallons of water annually – enough to wash 270 loads of laundry. That makes for a hefty water bill, too.

You can identify leaks in your home and start saving today with these three simple steps:

1. Check

Check your water bill and water meter for signs of leaks. If winter water use exceeds 12,000 gallons per month for a family of four, you probably have leaks. Read your water meter before and after a two-hour period when no water is being used. If the meter changes at all, you probably have a leak.

Water meters also have a leak indicator. If there is a plus (+) sign on your digital water meter, or if a red dial is moving — even slowly — when water isn’t being used, that’s a sign of a leak. Look for dripping faucets, showerheads, sprinklers, and other fixtures. Silent toilet leaks, a common problem that can send water bills soaring, can be detected by placing a few drops of food coloring into the toilet tank and waiting 10 minutes before flushing. If any color appears in the bowl during that time, you have a leak.

Don’t forget to check irrigation systems and spigots too.

2. Twist

Apply pipe tape to ensure plumbing fixture connections are sealed tight and give leaking faucets and showerheads a firm twist with a wrench. If you can’t stop the drips yourself, contact a licensed plumber. For additional savings, twist a WaterSense labeled aerator onto each bathroom faucet to save water without noticing a difference in flow. Faucet aerators cost a few dollars or less and can save a household more than 500 gallons each year — enough for 180 showers.

3. Replace

If you just can’t nip that drip, it may be time to replace your fixture. WaterSense-labeled models use at least 20 percent less water and are independently certified to perform as well or better than standard plumbing fixtures. Replacing an old, inefficient showerhead with a WaterSense-labeled model will shrink your household’s water footprint by 2,900 gallons annually while still letting you shower with power, thanks to EPA’s efficiency and performance criteria. With less hot water passing through, WaterSense labeled showerheads can also save enough energy to power your television for a year.

Replace your old toilet using 3½ gallons per flush or more with a WaterSense-labeled toilet, and you could be eligible for a rebate of up to $100.

Get Involved

Grab a wrench this week or contact your favorite handy person, plumber, or licensed irrigator to address leaking toilets, faucets, showerheads, and irrigation systems around your home.

If you find and fix a leak, take a picture (a leaky selfie?) and share it on Twitter (#ifixleaks). For more information on how to save water, go to cstx.gov/water or contact me at jnations@cstx.gov.

Related Links:

 


About the Blogger

Jennifer Nations has been the City of College Station’s water resource coordinator since 1999 after two years as BVSWMA’s environmental compliance officer. She’s also chair of the Water Conservation and Reuse Division for the Texas Section of the American Water Works Association. A native of Fremont, Calif., Jennifer earned a bachelor’s degree in environmental & resource science from UC-Davis in 1995 and a master’s degree in water management & hydrologic science from Texas A&M in 2016.


 

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3 simple steps to save big on your water bill

By Jennifer Nations, Water Resource Coordinator

More than one trillion gallons of water are wasted in American homes each year because of easy-to-fix leaks. That’s why the City of College Station is joining with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency this week to encourage homeowners to find and repair leaks during the annual Fix a Leak Week.

In the average home, household leaks waste more than 10,000 gallons of water each year. That’s enough water for 270 loads of laundry.

You can identify leaks around your home and start saving today with these three simple steps:

1. Check

Check your water bill and water meter for signs of leaks. If your water use this winter exceeded 12,000 gallons a month for a family of four, you probably had leaks. Read your water meter before and after a two-hour period when you’re not using any water. If the meter changes at all, you probably have a leak. Water meters also have a leak indicator – if there is a (+) sign on a digital water meter, or if the red dial is moving at all when you’re not using water – that’s a sign of a leak.

Check for dripping faucets, showerheads, sprinklers, and other fixtures. Silent toilet leaks, a common culprit of high water bills, can be detected by placing a few drops of food coloring into the toilet tank and waiting 10 minutes before flushing. If any color appears in the bowl during that time, you have a leak. Don’t forget to check your irrigation system and spigots, too.

2. Twist

Apply pipe tape to make sure plumbing fixture connections are sealed tight and give leaking faucets and showerheads a firm twist with a wrench. If you can’t stop those drops yourself, contact a licensed plumber.

For additional savings, twist a WaterSense-labeled aerator onto each bathroom faucet to save water without affecting flow. Faucet aerators only cost a few dollars can save a household more than 500 gallons each year—enough for 180 showers.

3. Replace

If you just can’t nip that drip, it may be time to replace the fixture. Look for WaterSense-labeled models, which use at least 20 percent less water and are independently certified to perform as well or better than standard fixtures. Replacing an old, inefficient showerhead with a WaterSense labeled model will shrink your household’s water footprint by 2,900 gallons annually while still letting you shower with power, thanks to EPA’s efficiency and performance criteria.

With less hot water passing through, WaterSense-labeled showerheads can also save enough energy to power a television for a year. If you Replace an old toilet that uses 3.5 gallons or more per flush with a WaterSense-labeled toilet, you could be eligible for a $100 rebate.

How do you get started?

First, click here to take the WaterSense Pledge, then follow WaterSense on Facebook and Twitter to get the latest tips.

Finally, grab a wrench or contact your favorite handy person, plumber, or certified irrigation professional to repair your leaky toilets, faucets, showerheads, and irrigation systems.

The water you save will help conserve our precious water while saving you a substantial amount of money.

 


7204119348_7a9cc790a2_oAbout the Author

Jennifer Nations has been the City of College Station’s water resource coordinator for more than 15 years after two years as BVSWMA’s environmental compliance officer. She’s also chair of the Water Conservation and Reuse Division for the Texas Section of the American Water Works Association. A native of Fremont, Calif., Jennifer earned a bachelor’s degree in environmental & resource science from UC-Davis in 1995 and earned a master’s degree in water management & hydrologic science from Texas A&M in 2016.


 

If you found value in this blog post, please share it with your social network and friends!

 

 


1 trillion reasons why every drop counts

If you think the tiny drip from your bathroom faucet doesn’t really waste all that much water, think again. Leaks in the average American home account for about 10,000 gallons a year – or about 12 percent of your annual water bill. That’s enough water for 270 loads of laundry.

What happens when you combine your small drips with billions of leaks across the country? According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, leaks waste more than 1 trillion gallons of water in the United States each year. A 1 followed by 12 zeros is a pretty large number, right?   

Put it this way: Texas is roughly 270,000 square miles. One trillion square miles would equal 3.7 million Texas-sized states.

Still don’t think every drop counts?

(more…)