Posts tagged “Wastewater

Where there’s smoke, there isn’t always fire

By Jennifer Nations, Water Resource Coordinator

In recent weeks, College Station Water Services has been conducting another round of smoke testing to evaluate the condition of some of our community’s aging wastewater lines. We started in the oldest areas of our wastewater collection system and will periodically test other parts of the system.

Through next week, we’ll be smoke testing in the area bounded by Harvey Road, Texas Avenue, Francis Drive, and Earl Rudder Freeway.

We do our best to make sure the public is aware of these tests, but the Fire Department still gets calls from worried residents who see smoke seeping out of sinks, vent pipes, manholes, and even the ground. Although no fire is present, CSFD still must respond, which ties up our valuable emergency response resources.

Smoke testing identifies locations of defects and improper connections. Technicians blow an odorless and non-toxic mist into the sewer and wait to see where it leaks out. It may exit through vent pipes on roofs, wastewater manholes, and the ground above breaks in the sewer system. Smoke might even find its way into service connections and vent from buildings served by the wastewater lines.

What are the benefits?

The wastewater collection system is designed to treat wastewater, not stormwater, and plays a vital role in maintaining our infrastructure. Excess water from inflow and infiltration takes up capacity in the pipes and ends up in our treatment plants, where it must be treated like sewage and results in higher treatment costs.

Inflow is stormwater that enters the sewer system through direct connections such as downspouts and drains that are connected to sewer service lines. Infiltration is rainfall that accumulates near sewer lines and enters the system through structural problems such as cracks and holes in the pipes.

Is it dangerous?

We use an odorless, non-toxic, non-staining mist that’s highly visible at low concentrations. It’s not really smoke, so it isn’t hazardous. If the mist enters your home, open your windows or doors and it should quickly dissipate.

Typically, the smoke enters buildings through a dry P-trap — the curved portion of pipe under the sink — or outside the base of a toilet where the wax seal has come undone. You can prevent this by running water down infrequently-used sinks. The sinks you use regularly have water in the P-trap that keeps the smoke from entering.

For more information, contact me at 979-764-6223. Please report problems with water, wastewater, or electricity to utility dispatch any time at 855-528-4278 and have your account number ready.


About the Blogger

Jennifer Nations has been the City of College Station’s water resource coordinator since 1999 after two years as BVSWMA’s environmental compliance officer. She’s also chair of the Water Conservation and Reuse Division for the Texas Section of the American Water Works Association. A native of Fremont, Calif., Jennifer earned a bachelor’s degree in environmental & resource science from UC-Davis in 1995 and a master’s degree in water management & hydrologic science from Texas A&M in 2016.


 

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Where there’s smoke, there’s wastewater

By Jennifer Nations, Water Resource Coordinator

College Station Water Services’ has started its latest round of smoke testing to evaluate the condition of some of our older wastewater lines. Since today is World Toilet Day, it’s a perfect time to make sure these sewer lines are working properly.

We’ll conduct the tests along University Drive and part of the Eastgate area today through Friday between 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. If necessary, we may have to extend some of the work to Monday.

World Toilet Day is designed to inspire action about the global sanitation crisis. According to the World Health Organization, a safely managed sanitation service means people can use toilet facilities that are their own, not shared, and we dispose of waste in a manner that protects human health and the environment.

Smoke testing is an indispensable tool that helps us maintain our essential infrastructure by identifying the locations of defects and improper connections. Our technicians blow an odorless and non-toxic smoke into the sewer and wait to see where it might leak.

As part of the process, smoke may exit through vent pipes on roofs, wastewater manholes, and from the ground where there are breaks in the sewer system. It’s also possible that smoke may find its way into service connections and vent from buildings served by the lines.

Our wastewater collection system is designed to treat wastewater, not stormwater, and excess water takes up capacity in the pipes and winds up in our wastewater treatment plants. We must treat like sewage the extra water that gets into our system through inflow and infiltration, and that means higher treatment costs.

Inflow is stormwater that enters the system through direct connections such as downspouts and drains connected to service lines. Infiltration is rainfall that accumulates near sewer lines and enters the system through structural problems such as cracks and holes in the pipes.

We should count ourselves as fortunate that we aren’t among the 4.2 billion people worldwide who don’t have access to safely managed sanitation services.

For more information, contact me at 979-764-6223 or jnations@cstx.gov.

 


About the Blogger

Jennifer Nations has been the City of College Station’s water resource coordinator since 1999 after two years as BVSWMA’s environmental compliance officer. She’s also chair of the Water Conservation and Reuse Division for the Texas Section of the American Water Works Association. A native of Fremont, Calif., Jennifer earned a bachelor’s degree in environmental & resource science from UC-Davis in 1995 and a master’s degree in water management & hydrologic science from Texas A&M in 2016.


 

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Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (May 23)

Sitting (L-R): Mayor Pro Tem Linda Harvell, Mayor Karl Mooney, Eleanor Vessali. Standing (L-R): Bob Brick, Jerome Rektorik, John Nichols, Dennis Maloney.

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, May 23. It’s not the official minutes.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink channel 19 or online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:24 p.m.

The workshop has started. The council took no action out of the executive session.

5:25 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled no consent items for workshop discussion.

5:50 p.m.

Economic Development Update

The council reviewed the city’s economic development efforts and discussed ways to enhance our economic competitiveness. 

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:28 p.m.

Fire Asset Reliability

The council reviewed the Fire Department’s adequacy and response reliability.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:32 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar and received committee reports. The regular meeting will start after a short break.

6:38 p.m.

The regular meeting has started. Mayor Mooney said item No. 3 on the regular agenda (parking restrictions on Langford, King Arthur, Guadalupe, and Lancelot) has been pulled and will not be considered tonight.

6:58 p.m.

Hear Visitors

Seven people spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens might address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda.

  • Councilwoman Elianor Vessali recognized Army Capt. Sean P. Sims as part of the Fallen Heroes Project. The 32-year-old El Paso native died on Nov. 13, 2004, when his unit received small arms fire while clearing a building in Fallujah, Iraq.
  • Carlos Espina, Eduardo Espina, Carlos Prida, and Raphael Cruzan asked the council to bring soccer fields back to Anderson Park.
  • Donald and Patsy Deere spoke against the proposed parking restrictions on Langford, King Arthur, Guadalupe, and Lancelot. That item has been pulled from tonight’s agenda.

6:59 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • A $287,305 contract with Air-Tech Brazos Valley for facilities corrective maintenance services.
  • The $330,029.53 purchase of furnishings from multiple vendors for the renovated Larry J. Ringer Library.
  • An ordinance amendment that clarifies that customers are responsible for placing solid waste containers out for collection and for removing them afterward.
  • An ordinance amendment that clarifies that payment is not a defense for a violation of prohibited parking. Some Northgate parking spaces transition at times to prohibited parking for loading zones or passenger pick-up and the payment system can’t prohibit payment during these times.
  • An ordinance amendment that increases the civil fine for parking without paying in the Northgate Garage from $50 to $115 for payment within 10 days and from $60 to $125 for payment after 10 days.

7:14 p.m.

Parking Restrictions on Poplar, Ash, Live Oak and Nimitz

The council voted unanimously to remove stopping, standing, and parking along one side of Poplar, Live Oak, Ash, and Nimitz Streets, and on one side of a segment of Edelweiss Avenue from 7-9 a.m. and 2-3:30 p.m. on school days.

Ash Street residents contacted the city about cars parked on both sides of the road that could impede emergency vehicle access. Additional evaluation led the Traffic Management Team to also recommend parking restrictions on Poplar, Live Oak, and Nimitz.

The principal of Rock Prairie Elementary contacted the city about cars parked on both sides of the road during the afternoon pick-up times, which affects the ability to see children crossing. In addition, when vehicles park along Edelweiss, the road effectively becomes a single-lane roadway for a two-direction operation.

Here are the PowerPoint presentations:

7:22 p.m.

Landscaping and Mowing Contract

The council voted unanimously to approve a $1.06 million contract with Green Teams for citywide mowing and landscape maintenance. The contract does not include regional parks and athletic fields.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:31 p.m.

Wellborn-Holleman Intersection

The council voted unanimously to approve an advance funding agreement with the Texas Department of Transportation for improvements at the Wellborn Road-Holleman Drive intersection. The agreement has no budgetary impact and covers work within the state’s right-of-way. 

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:33 p.m.

Southwood Valley Sewer Line

The council voted unanimously to approve a $1.22 million contract with Palasota Contracting for the Southwood Valley Trunk Line Phase 1 Project to increase capacity for development.

The project area starts about 160 feet south of Bee Creek on the west side of State Highway 6, runs south for about 1,000 feet toward the northwest corner of FM 2818 and State Highway 6, then goes southwest about 1,250 feet toward Brothers Boulevard.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:38 p.m.

Highway 6 Gateway Sign

The council voted unanimously to approve a $149,486 contract with JaCody Construction for a gateway sign located just north of Peach Creek Cutoff along State Highway 6 within TxDOT right-of-way.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:44 p.m.

The council discussed and reviewed future agenda items, and Mayor Mooney adjourned the meeting. The council meets again on Thursday, June 13.

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (April 25)

Sitting (L-R): Mayor Pro Tem Linda Harvell, Mayor Karl Mooney, Eleanor Vessali. Standing (L-R): Bob Brick, Jerome Rektorik, John Nichols, Dennis Maloney.

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, April 25. It’s not the official minutes.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink channel 19 or online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:13 p.m.

The workshop has started. The council took no action out of the executive session.

5:35 p.m.

Planning & Zoning Commission Plan of Work

The council conducted a joint meeting with the Planning and Zoning Commission to discuss the commission’s 2019 plan of work, which includes items related to the Comprehensive Plan, neighborhood integrity, and the Unified Development Ordinance.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

5:39 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled these consent items for workshop discussion:

  • Drought Contingency and Water Conservation Plan: The 2014 Drought Contingency Plan update contained several revisions from the previous version adopted in 2009. The proposed plan does not make significant changes from 2014. The 2019 plan maintains year-round encouragement of voluntary water conservation, following guidance from the state.

6:04 p.m.

Thomas Park Improvements

The council discussed improvements for Thomas Park. City staff recommends completing the plan over multiple years, staying in the first year within the $1 million budgeted for FY19. Mayor Mooney suspended the discussion, which will resume after the regular meeting.

The Parks and Recreation Board recommends spending the $1 million on a covered tennis court, a dog park and two covered picnic tables on the park’s north end.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:05 p.m.

Mayor Mooney suspended the workshop, which will resume after the regular meeting. The council will take a short break.

6:13 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

6:20 p.m.

Groundwater Conservationist of the Year

The Brazos Valley Groundwater Conservation District presented Pebble Creek Country Club with its Groundwater Conservationist of the Year Award for commercial irrigation.

6:23 p.m.

National Community Development Week

The mayor proclaimed this week as National Community Development Week.

6:26 p.m.

Municipal Clerk’s Week

The mayor proclaimed May 5-11 as Municipal Clerks Week.

6:52 p.m.

Hear Visitors

?? people spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens might address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda.

  • Councilwoman Elianor Vessali recognized Air Force Airman 1st Class Corey C. Owens as part of the Fallen Heroes Project. The 26-year-old San Antonio native died on Feb. 17, 2011, in a non-combat incident at Al Asad Air Base, Iraq.
  • Eight people spoke in support of building a new pool in Thomas Park.

6:53 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • An annual blanket purchase order estimated at $180,000 with Lonestar Freightliner Group for repair parts and labor for fire trucks.
  • A $352,000 change order to the Graham Road Substation Project and a revision to the date of substantial completion from Oct. 1 to Jan. 31.
  • Renewal of an annual contract not to exceed $150,000 with All Around Tree Service for landscaping, tree trimming, and removal services.
  • A $281,998 contract with Bayer Construction Electrical Contractors for the installation of a traffic signal at the intersection of Barron Road and Alexandria Avenue.
  • An ordinance amending the city’s Code of Ordinances regarding secondhand dealers.
  • An ordinance amending the city’s Code of Ordinances regarding drought contingency and the Water Emergency Plan.
  • A resolution adopting the updated Water Conservation Plan as required by the state.
  • An ordinance amending the city’s Code of Ordinances to stagger appointments to boards and committees to allow the city council to make annual appointments.

7:24 p.m.

Comp Plan Committee Appointments

The council made appointments to the Comprehensive Plan Evaluation Committee, which will serve as the steering committee for the city’s 10-Year Comprehensive Plan review:

  • City Council: John Nichols, Linda Harvell, Elianor Vessali
  • Planning & Zoning Commission: Dennis Christiansen, Elizabeth Cunha, Jeremy Osborne (Alternate: Joe Guerra)
  • Citizens: Michael Buckley, Clint Cooper, Brian Bochner, Bradford Brimley, Lisa Halperin, Julie Schultz
  • Extraterritorial Jurisdiction: Shana Elliott

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:31 p.m.

Bird Pond Road Land Use

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the land use from Estate to Restricted Suburban for about 13 acres northeast of the Rock Prairie-Bird Pond intersection. The change will allow the development of a residential subdivision. 

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:59 p.m.

Bird Pond Road Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the zoning from Estate to Planned Development District for the same 13 acres as in the previous item. 

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:08 p.m.

Northgate District Study

The council voted unanimously to approve a $188,000 contract with Waltman Group to complete a Northgate District study and mobility/operations plan. The increase in high-density residential development has created safety and mobility concerns for people walking, biking, and driving during weekdays and weekend evenings.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:16 p.m.

Lick Creek Sewer Trunk Line

The council voted unanimously to approve a $10.9 million contract with Thalle Construction for the Lick Creek Trunk Line Project. The sewer line will extend from the Lick Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant through the southern boundary of Pebble Creek Country Club and tie into an existing line north of Fitch Parkway.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:21 p.m.

Ringer Library Shelving

The council voted unanimously to approve the $460,000 million purchase of shelving for the newly renovated Ringer Library from Lone Star Furnishings. The renovation project budgeted $875,000 to furnish the building. Requests for remaining furnishings will be presented to the council at a later date.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:23 p.m.

The council discussed future agenda items. Mayor Mooney adjourned the regular meeting. The workshop will resume after a short break.

8:30 p.m.

The workshop has resumed.

9:37 p.m.

Thomas Park Discussion (continued)

The council concluded its earlier workshop discussion of improvements for Thomas Park. The consensus of the council was to not include a dog park or splash pad but to continue exploring a new swimming pool and other possible improvements as part of a broader plan. The discussion will continue as part of the FY20 budget process.

9:41 p.m.

Mayor Mooney adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar and received committee reports.

The council meets again on Monday, May 13.

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science from Texas Tech.


 

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5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (about 5 p.m.) and regular (6 p.m.) meetings.

Here are five items to watch:

  1. Thomas Park Improvements: In the workshop, the council will discuss options for improvements to Thomas Park. The Parks and Recreation Advisory Board recommends a covered tennis court, a dog park and two covered picnic tables on the park’s north end.
  2. Traffic Signal at Barron-Alexandria: The consent agenda includes a $282,000 contract to install a traffic signal at the Barron Road-Alexandria Avenue intersection.
  3. Water Conservation and Drought Plans: Also on the consent agenda are updates to the city’s drought contingency and water conservation plans.
  4. Bird Pond Road Development: After a pair of public hearings, the commission will consider a request to change the land use and zoning for about 13 acres northeast of the Rock Prairie-Bird Pond intersection. The changes would allow the development of a residential subdivision.
  5. Lick Creek Sewer Line: The council will consider a $10.9 million contract with Thalle Construction for the Lick Creek Trunk Line Project. The sewer line will extend from the Lick Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant through the southern boundary of Pebble Creek Country Club and tie into an existing line north of Fitch Parkway.

Related Links:                                                                 

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


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5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (about 5 p.m.) and regular (6 p.m.) meetings.

Here are five items to watch:

  1. CSPD Resource Allocation Study: In the workshop, the council will review a study by Etico Solutions that evaluated and analyzed police officer staffing. The information is based on five years of call data and three years of leave.
  2. Wolf Pen Creek Corridor: The council will have a workshop discussion on the status of the Wolf Pen Creek Corridor.
  3. Wastewater Public Utility Corridor: After a public hearing in the regular meeting, the council will consider establishing a public utility corridor for the Northeast Wastewater Trunk Line Project Phase 2 within city greenways east of Art & Myra Bright Park in the Raintree subdivision and east of Wilderness Drive.
  4. 10-year Comprehensive Plan Update: The council will consider a $167,500 contract with Planning NEXT for the city’s Comprehensive Plan 10-Year Evaluation and Appraisal Report. The planning process will begin in May and is expected to be finished by next summer.
  5. Georgie K. Fitch Park Trail: The council will consider a $363,000 contract with Kieschnick General Contractors for the development of the Georgie K. Fitch Park Trail to safely connect the park to the Ringer Library.

Related Links:                                                                 

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


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Fighting fatbergs is a dirty (but avoidable) job

By Jennifer Nations, Water Resource Coordinator

Remember the iconic line from the movie “Titanic”?

“Fatberg, right ahead!”

Wait, what?

Sorry, the movie line was actually about an iceberg. But fatbergs are real, and they can put a fat hole in a utility’s maintenance and operations budget.

Fats, oils, and grease (FOG) – along with flushable and non-flushable rags and wipes – merge in our sewers to form solid, immovable blockages known as fatbergs. They are worse in the winter months when cooler temperatures make it easier for the FOG to solidify.

Recently in London, it took nine weeks to dislodge a fatberg measuring 800 feet long and weighing 130 tons. That’s the same as 10 London double-decker buses.

The unsightly blobs can also significantly impact water quality and the environment after sewer overflows. We traced a recent sewer overflow to grease and paper towels coming from a fast food restaurant, which had to close for five hours while we made repairs.

Who drew the short straw?

While College Station hasn’t had fatbergs that colossal, we aren’t immune to problems caused by FOG and wipes. When a big grease blob sticks to the ultraviolet light used to disinfect our wastewater, the light can’t do its job.

When that happens, Courageous operators must manually remove disgusting balls of grease, wads of wipes, paper towels – even underwear – to keep expensive equipment from being damaged.

I’m not sure, but our brave operators probably draw straws to see who handles that dirty job!

Fatbergs can be costly

FOG and trash in the sewer system can also lead to increases in your wastewater rate. For the Lick Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant expansion, a $150,000 preliminary screening station was added to the design to remove such things as wipes, rags, hygiene products of the cotton and plastic variety, and trash.

If you need to see it to believe it, the City of Spokane, Washington filmed an experiment with several commonly flushed items to find the answer to the question “will it flush?” Spoiler alert: only the toilet paper flushed.

Manually removing the grease at our wastewater plants costs the city an average of $600 a week.

3 ways to trim the fat

  1. Scrape food scraps into the garbage and let grease solidify in pans before placing it in the trash. Pour oil and grease into a can and after it hardens, put the sealed container in the regular trash.
  2. Avoid placing paper products – even those marked as flushable – down the drain or in the toilet. #NoWipesinPipes
  3. You can help protect your sewer system by remembering to only flush the 3 P’s – pee, poop, and toilet paper.

College Station Water Services – especially our valiant wastewater operators – appreciate your assistance in reducing our fatberg problem.

If you have any questions, email me at jnations@cstx.gov.

 


About the Blogger

Jennifer Nations has been the City of College Station’s water resource coordinator since 1999 after two years as BVSWMA’s environmental compliance officer. She’s also chair of the Water Conservation and Reuse Division for the Texas Section of the American Water Works Association. A native of Fremont, Calif., Jennifer earned a bachelor’s degree in environmental & resource science from UC-Davis in 1995 and a master’s degree in water management & hydrologic science from Texas A&M in 2016.


 

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Fighting fatbergs is a dirty – but avoidable – job

By Jennifer Nations, Water Resource Coordinator

The iconic line from the movie “Titanic” is “fatberg, right ahead!”

Wait, what?

Sorry, the line was actually about an iceberg. But “fatbergs” are real and can put a fat hole in a utility’s maintenance and operations budget, not to mention causing significant impacts to water quality and the environment from sewer overflows.

Fats, oils, and grease (FOG) – along with flushable and non-flushable rags and wipes – merge in our sewers to form solid, immovable blockages known in our business as fatbergs. They are worse in the winter months when cooler temperatures make it easier for the FOG to solidify.

Recently in London, it took nine weeks to dislodge a fatberg measuring 800 feet long and weighing 130 tons. For comparison, 130 tons is equivalent to 10 London double-decker buses.

Water Production Operator Jared Lapaglia surveys a mass of non-flushables cleared from a pump.

Who drew the short straw?

While College Station hasn’t had fatbergs that colossal, we aren’t immune to problems caused by FOG and wipes. Our wastewater treatment plants use ultraviolet light to disinfect the treated wastewater, and when a big grease blob sticks to the UV light, the light can’t do its job. Courageous operators must manually remove balls of grease, wads of wipes, paper towels – we’ve even found underwear – to keep our equipment from being damaged.

I’m not sure, but our brave operators probably draw straws to see who handles that dirty job!

Fatbergs can be costly

FOG and trash in the sewer system can also lead to increases in your wastewater rates. For the Lick Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant expansion, a $150,000 preliminary screening station was added to the design to remove such things as wipes, rags, hygiene products of the cotton and plastic variety, and trash.

Manually removing the grease at our wastewater plants costs College Station an average of $600 each week. We traced a recent sewer overflow to grease and paper towels coming from a fast food restaurant, which had to close for five hours while we made repairs.

Ways to trim fatbergs down to size

  1. Scrape food scraps into the garbage and let grease solidify in pans first before placing it in the trash. Pour oil and grease into a can. Once it has hardened, you can put the sealed container in regular trash.
  2. Avoid placing paper products – even those marked as flushable – down the drain or in the toilet. #NoWipesinPipes
  3. You can help protect your sewer system by remembering to only flush the 3 P’s – pee, poop, and toilet paper.

Water Services – especially our valiant wastewater operators – appreciate your help in reducing our fatberg problem. If you have any questions, contact me at jnations@cstx.gov.

 


About the Blogger

Jennifer Nations has been the City of College Station’s water resource coordinator since 1999 after two years as BVSWMA’s environmental compliance officer. She’s also chair of the Water Conservation and Reuse Division for the Texas Section of the American Water Works Association. A native of Fremont, Calif., Jennifer earned a bachelor’s degree in environmental & resource science from UC-Davis in 1995 and a master’s degree in water management & hydrologic science from Texas A&M in 2016.


 

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5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (6 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:

  1. ETJ and Annexation Plan: In the workshop, the council will hear an overview of the city’s extraterritorial jurisdiction (ETJ) and annexation plan, including the status of several non-annexation development agreements that are expiring soon.
  2. Sanitation Audit and Rate Study: Another workshop item is an internal audit of the city’s sanitation operations and a recent study on sanitation rates.
  3. Architectural Advisory Committee: The final workshop discussion will be about the possible creation of an architectural advisory committee to provide the city council additional input into the planning of municipal facilities.
  4. Carters Creek Treatment Plant Improvements: As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider a $1.97 million contract for improvements to the electrical system at the Carters Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant.
  5. Medical District Sewer Line: Also on the consent agenda is a participation agreement for the construction of a new sewer trunk line in the Medical District. College Station Town Center, Inc., needs a new line to serve its planned development, and the city needs one along the same route to transfer flows from other areas to the expanded Lick Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Channels 19 and 119 (HD), or online. The website includes an archive of previous council meetings. We’ll post a detailed live blog on this site.

Related Links:                                                                 

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (6 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:

  1. Water Conservation Update: In the workshop, the council will hear a presentation about local water conservation efforts, including a summary of significant achievements and ongoing programs.
  2. Funding Agreements: As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider annual funding agreements with the Memorial for All Veterans of the Brazos Valley, Research Valley Partnership, Noon Lions Club, Arts Council, Chamber of Commerce, Easterwood Airport, Experience B-CS, and Keep Brazos Beautiful.
  3. Eastgate Water/Wastewater Rehabilitation: Another consent agenda item is a $3.3 million contract for Phase IV of the rehabilitation of water and wastewater lines in the Eastgate area.
  4. Northpoint Crossing Change: After a public hearing, the council will consider a request to amend the concept plan for about 11 acres in the Northpoint Crossing Subdivision. The change would reduce sidewalks along Northpoint Crossing Drive to allow for the redesign of parking and would modify the sign ordinance to improve site identification and wayfinding.
  5. Roadway Impact Fees: After a public hearing, the council will consider reducing the roadway impact fee rate to zero. The fees are imposed on new development to help offset the city’s cost of building new roadways. The existing rate is scheduled to go into effect Dec. 1 and is expected to generate $12 million in the next decade.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Channels 19 and 119 (HD), or online. The website includes an archive of previous council meetings. We’ll post a detailed live blog on this site.

Related Links:                                                                 

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after serving 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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3 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (6 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. The council has a short agenda this week, so here are three items to watch:

  1. Thoroughfare Plan: In the workshop, the council will hear an update on the Metropolitan Planning Organization’s proposed 2050 Major Thoroughfare Concept Map and the College Station Thoroughfare Plan.
  2. Capital Projects Funding: The council will have a workshop discussion about funding capital projects.
  3. Woodson Village Utility Rehabilitation: As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider an $816,000 consultant contract for design and construction phase services for the replacement of water and sewer lines near Haines Drive, Glade Street, Dexter Drive, and Timm Drive.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Channels 19 and 119 (HD), or online. The website includes an archive of previous council meetings. We’ll post a detailed live blog on this site.

Related Links:                                                                 

 


About the Blogger

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (5:30 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:

  1. Municipal Property Master Plan: The council will hear a workshop presentation about the city’s efforts since the late 1990s to plan for municipal properties.
  2. Northeast Sewer Line: As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider a $1.8 million contract for Phase I of the Northeast Sanitary Sewer Trunk Line, located south of Harvey Road and northwest of the Windwood and Horse Haven Estates subdivision.
  3. Rock Prairie Road Widening Project: The council will consider a $197,000 change order to the contract for the Rock Prairie Road West Widening Project to cover the relocation of water lines that conflict with new storm sewers.
  4. Northgate Loading Zone/Bollards: The council will consider a $297,000 contract to improve safety and aesthetics in Northgate by closing off the loading area on University Drive and adding sidewalks and drainage. Removable bollards would also be installed in four locations where existing pneumatic bollards don’t function properly.
  5. Margraves Property Rezoning: After a public hearing, the council will consider a request to change the zoning for about 369 acres east of Greens Prairie Road, west of Arrington Road, and south of Whites Creek Lane. The change will allow for residential development.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Channels 19 and 119 (HD), or online. The website includes an archive of previous council meetings. We’ll post a detailed live blog on this site.

Related links:                                                                 

 


About the Author

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010 after 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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3 simple steps to save big on your water bill

By Jennifer Nations, Water Resource Coordinator

More than one trillion gallons of water are wasted in American homes each year because of easy-to-fix leaks. That’s why the City of College Station is joining with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency this week to encourage homeowners to find and repair leaks during the annual Fix a Leak Week.

In the average home, household leaks waste more than 10,000 gallons of water each year. That’s enough water for 270 loads of laundry.

You can identify leaks around your home and start saving today with these three simple steps:

1. Check

Check your water bill and water meter for signs of leaks. If your water use this winter exceeded 12,000 gallons a month for a family of four, you probably had leaks. Read your water meter before and after a two-hour period when you’re not using any water. If the meter changes at all, you probably have a leak. Water meters also have a leak indicator – if there is a (+) sign on a digital water meter, or if the red dial is moving at all when you’re not using water – that’s a sign of a leak.

Check for dripping faucets, showerheads, sprinklers, and other fixtures. Silent toilet leaks, a common culprit of high water bills, can be detected by placing a few drops of food coloring into the toilet tank and waiting 10 minutes before flushing. If any color appears in the bowl during that time, you have a leak. Don’t forget to check your irrigation system and spigots, too.

2. Twist

Apply pipe tape to make sure plumbing fixture connections are sealed tight and give leaking faucets and showerheads a firm twist with a wrench. If you can’t stop those drops yourself, contact a licensed plumber.

For additional savings, twist a WaterSense-labeled aerator onto each bathroom faucet to save water without affecting flow. Faucet aerators only cost a few dollars can save a household more than 500 gallons each year—enough for 180 showers.

3. Replace

If you just can’t nip that drip, it may be time to replace the fixture. Look for WaterSense-labeled models, which use at least 20 percent less water and are independently certified to perform as well or better than standard fixtures. Replacing an old, inefficient showerhead with a WaterSense labeled model will shrink your household’s water footprint by 2,900 gallons annually while still letting you shower with power, thanks to EPA’s efficiency and performance criteria.

With less hot water passing through, WaterSense-labeled showerheads can also save enough energy to power a television for a year. If you Replace an old toilet that uses 3.5 gallons or more per flush with a WaterSense-labeled toilet, you could be eligible for a $100 rebate.

How do you get started?

First, click here to take the WaterSense Pledge, then follow WaterSense on Facebook and Twitter to get the latest tips.

Finally, grab a wrench or contact your favorite handy person, plumber, or certified irrigation professional to repair your leaky toilets, faucets, showerheads, and irrigation systems.

The water you save will help conserve our precious water while saving you a substantial amount of money.

 


7204119348_7a9cc790a2_oAbout the Author

Jennifer Nations has been the City of College Station’s water resource coordinator for more than 15 years after two years as BVSWMA’s environmental compliance officer. She’s also chair of the Water Conservation and Reuse Division for the Texas Section of the American Water Works Association. A native of Fremont, Calif., Jennifer earned a bachelor’s degree in environmental & resource science from UC-Davis in 1995 and earned a master’s degree in water management & hydrologic science from Texas A&M in 2016.


 

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5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

5523701_l

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (6 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:

  1. New Police Facility: In the workshop, the council will hear an update on the design of a new police facility on the southeast corner of the Dartmouth Street-Krenek Tap Road intersection.
  2. Commercial Preservation: The council will also have a workshop discussion about the city’s role in promoting the development of existing and potential commercial properties.
  3. Lick Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant: On the consent agenda is a $4.79 million contract for services associated with the expansion of the Lick Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant.
  4. Arrington Road Rezoning: After a public hearing, the council will consider a request to change the zoning designation from Rural to Multi-Family for about 12 acres south of the South Oaks Drive-Arrington Road intersection. The change would allow for development.
  5. Spring Creek Local Government Corporation: The council will consider approving the certificate of formation and bylaws of the Spring Creek Local Government Corporation, a non-profit government corporation created to promote economic development anchored by College Station’s next business park. The council will also consider initial board directors.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Ch. 19, or online. The website includes an archive of previous council meetings. We’ll post a detailed live blog on this site.

Related links:                                                                 

 


14316755_10108798313965164_2904942172107966680_nAbout the Author

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian)has been with the City of College Station since 2010. He previously served 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Dec. 8)

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Dec. 8. It’s not the official minutes.

The final council meeting of 2016 is being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and streamed online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

Woolwine Named City Employee of the Year

Earlier this afternoon, the council recognized Recycling & Environmental Compliance Manager Heather Woolwine as the city’s employee of the year. Woolwine’s year was highlighted by transitioning the city from a curbside sort-and-bag recycling system to a single-stream recycling program.

Other nominees for the award were also honored, along with employees receiving 20, 25, 30 and 35-year service awards. Woolwine is pictured below with Mayor Karl Mooney and City Manager Kelly Templin.

eoy-woolwine2

6:09 p.m.

The workshop has started.

Coming out of executive session, the council voted unanimously to authorize the city manager to settle the dispute involving contracts with N. Harris Computer Corporation related to the city’s Enterprise Resource Planning System. The City of College Station will receive a payment no less than $260,000.

6:11 p.m.

Schultz Elected Mayor Pro Tem

By a 5-2 vote, the council elected Councilwoman Julie Schultz for a one-year term as mayor pro tempore to act as mayor during times when the mayor may be absent or disabled. Councilwomen Blanche Brick and Linda Harvell voted against the motion.

6:19 p.m.

Water Demand Forecasting Audit

The council reviewed the city internal auditor’s Water Demand Forecasting Audit. The audit found the city’s existing forecasting methods have been sufficient but as the city grows and diversifies, risks may become more apparent. The auditor said the city could benefit from more complex in-house water demand forecasting approaches that allow for more thorough analysis.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:38 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled these consent items for workshop discussion:

  • Neighborhood Sidewalk Projects: The $203,269 contract with Palomares Construction is for sidewalks on the west side of Eisenhower Street, the south side of Live Oak Street, the north side of San Saba Drive, and an ADA accessible sidewalk on the south side of Cross Street. The projects will be funded by federal Community Development Block Grants.
  • LED Street Lights: The $2.6 million contract with Seimens Industries will replace the city’s 5,500 street lights with more efficient LED (light emitting diode) fixtures. When the city installed the state’s first street light monitoring system in 2009, it used high-quality bulbs with a plan to investigate LED replacement options when the bulbs’ six-year warranty expired. College Station Utilities estimates a 7-8 year payback on the new system, which should have a 30-year life expectancy.
  • Employee Benefit Expenditures: Total benefit expenditures for 969 city employees, retirees and COBRA participants in 2017 is expected to be about $11.23 million. This represents a cost of about $965 per employee each month, or $11,580 per employee each year. Benefits include Blue Cross Blue Shield (medical, dental, prescription, stop-loss coverage), vision insurance, basic life, accidental death & dismemberment, short-term disability, long-term disability, critical illness/accident insurance, and the employee assistance program.
  • Self-Contained Breathing Apparatuses: The not-to-exceed $956,480 contract with Casco Industries is for self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) equipment for the fire department. The department’s existing SCBA packs are 1999, 2002, and 2007 editions. Manufacturer support and service for the older packs is limited and in some cases obsolete. The National Fire Protection Association mandates that air bottles have a 15-year life span, and more than half of the city’s bottles will be out of service in 2017. The purchase will bring the department into compliance with the NFPA standard.
  • Electronic Credit Card Contract: The $85,000 monthly contract with OpenEdge is for banking fees and service charges related to electronic credit card processing and merchant account services.

7:00 p.m.

Wastewater Master Plan Update

The council reviewed a recent update to the city’s Wastewater Master Plan, including population and demographic projections, demand forecasts, an analysis of the collection system, the strategy for expanding the treatment plants, and the capital improvement plan.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:01 p.m.

The workshop has been suspended and will resume after the regular meeting, which will begin after a short break.

7:13 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

7:17 p.m.

Hear Visitors

One person spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens may address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda. Ben Roper recognized Marine Lance Cpl. Michael B. Wafford as part of the Fallen Heroes Memorial program. The 20-year-old Spring native died April 8, 2004, from injuries received from hostile fire in Al Anbar Province, Iraq.

7:18 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • A $203,469 contract with Palomares Construction for sidewalk improvements along Eisenhower, Live Oak, Cross Street, and San Saba.
  • A $2.56 million contract with Siemens Industries for converting street lighting to LED light fixtures.
  • Renewal of an inter-local agreement with BVSWMA for continued city sponsorship of BVSWMA, Inc. as an Associate Member of the Brazos Valley Wide Area Communications Service.
  • Renewal of an inter-local agreement with BVSWMA for communications services provided by the city.
  • $11.23 million for employee benefits for 2017 and the rejection of a request for proposal for stop-loss reinsurance.
  • A purchase not-to-exceed $956,480.73 for self-contained breathing apparatus equipment from Casco Industries.
  • Renewal of a month-to-month agreement with estimated banking fees and service charges not exceeding $85,000 monthly with OpenEdge for electronic credit card processing and merchant account services.
  • Renewal of four master agreements for real estate appraisal services: Atrium Real Estate Services, CBRE, Inc., Integra Realty Resources – Austin, and S.T. Lovett & Associates.
  • A $197,720 contract with H2O Partners for pavement and right-of-way data collection.
  • A $250,000 contract with DIJ Construction for the installation of roadway markings.
  • A $651,644.50 contract with Palasota Contracting the construction of the Well Field Collection System Loop Project.
  • The 2017 Council Calendar.
  • The first renewal of the annual blanket order with Techline for pad-mounted 15 kV solid dielectric switch gears.

 7:22 p.m.

Falcon Point Easement Abandonment

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to abandon a 355-square-foot portion of a public utility easement at 1915 Dartmouth Street to allow for development.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:24 p.m.

Fee Conflict Ordinance

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve an ordinance resolving fee conflicts in the city’s Code of Ordinances.

In October, the council approved a resolution adjusting application and permit fees for Planning & Development Services and consolidated fees into Chapter 14 of the Code of Ordinances. The resolution had a delayed effective date of Jan. 1 and included fees that were embedded in other sections of the Code of Ordinances, creating temporary conflicts. The ordinance amends the applicable sections to remove the respective fee and states, “Fees shall be as established from time-to-time by resolution of the city council.”

9:35 p.m.

Land Use Change on Corsair Circle

After a public hearing, the council voted 4-3 to change the land use designation from Suburban Commercial to General Commercial for about two acres on Corsair Circle just north of Pavilion Avenue. Brick, Harvell, and Mooney voted against the motion. The change will allow for the possible development of a hotel. 

In the public hearing, 20 people spoke against the change, and three submitted written comments.

An earlier motion by Councilwoman Brick to postpone the item to failed by a 4-3 vote. Brick, Harvell, and Mooney supported the motion.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

9:53 p.m.

Corsair Circle Rezoning

The council has been conducting a public hearing on the rezoning of the Corsair Circle property. The hearing will resume after a short break.

10:00 p.m.

The regular meeting has resumed.

10:20 p.m.

Corsair Circle Rezoning (continued)

After a public hearing, the council voted 4-3 to change the zoning from Light Industrial to General Commercial for about two acres on Corsair Circle just north of Pavilion Avenue. Brick, Harvell, and Mooney voted against the motion. The change will allow the development of a hotel.

In the public hearing, 10 people spoke against the change, and one submitted a written comment.

An earlier motion by Councilwoman Brick to postpone the item for three months failed by a 4-3 vote. Brick, Harvell, and Mooney supported the motion.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

11:40 p.m.

Sebesta Road Land Use Change

After a public hearing, the council voted 5-2 to approve a request to change the land use designation from Suburban Commercial to General Commercial for about 18 acres at 1370 Sebesta Rd. along State Highway 6. Brick and Harvell voted against the motion. The change will allow for the development of an automobile dealership and other commercial uses.

In the public hearing, 11 people spoke against the change, two supported it, one proposed a planned development district, and one submitted a written comment.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

11:47 p.m.

Sebesta Road Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted 5-2 to approve a request to change the zoning from General Suburban, Rural and Research & Development to General Commercial for about 18 acres at 1370 Sebesta Road along State Highway 6.Brick and Harvell voted against the motion.The change will allow for the development of an automobile dealership and other commercial uses.

In the public hearing, two people spoke against the change, and two submitted written comments.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

11:49 p.m.

Committee and Board Appointments

The council voted unanimously to approve these appointments to various boards and commissions:

  • Arts Council of the Brazos Valley: Linda Harvell replaces former councilman Steve Aldrich.
  • BioCorridor Board: James Benham replaces former councilman Steve Aldrich.
  • Blinn College Brazos County Advisory Committee: Karl Mooney replaces former mayor Nancy Berry.
  • Brazos County Health Department: Linda Harvell replaces former councilman John Nichols.
  • Bryan/College Station Convention & Visitors Bureau: Jerome Rektorik replaces former councilman John Nichols.

11:50 p.m.

The mayor adjourned the regular meeting. The workshop will resume after a short break.

12:01 p.m.

The council has gone into executive session and will complete the workshop agenda afterward.  Since all that remains are discussions about the council calendar, future agenda items, and committee reports, your loyal blogger is calling it a night.

The council meets again on Thursday, Jan. 12.

We wish everyone a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!


14316755_10108798313965164_2904942172107966680_nAbout the Author

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian) has been with the City of College Station since 2010. He previously served 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also been a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.



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5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

5523701_l

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (5:30 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:

  1. Wastewater Master Plan Update: In the workshop, the council will review the city’s updated Wastewater Master Plan, which includes demand projections and a capital improvement plan.
  2. Neighborhood Sidewalk Improvements: As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider a $203,000 contract for sidewalks on the west side of Eisenhower Street, the south side of Live Oak Street, the north side of San Saba Drive, and an ADA accessible sidewalk on the south side of Cross Street. The projects will be funded by federal Community Development Block Grants.
  3. LED Street Lighting: Also on the consent agenda is a $2.56 million contract for replacing the city’s street lights with more efficient LED (light emitting diode) fixtures.
  4. Corsair Circle Rezoning: After a public hearing, the council will consider a request to change the land use and zoning designations for about two acres on Corsair Circle just north of Pavilion Avenue. The changes would allow for the development of a hotel.
  5. SH 6-Sebesta Rezoning: After a public hearing, the council will consider a request to change the land use and zoning designations for about 18 acres south of Sebesta Road along State Highway 6. The changes would allow for commercial development.

Before the council’s executive session, the city’s employee of the year will be announced at 3:30 p.m. and honored with the other nominees at a reception. Employees with at least 20, 25, 30 and 35 years of service also will be recognized.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Ch. 19, or online. The website includes an archive of previous council meetings. We’ll post a detailed live blog on this site.

Related links:     

         


14316755_10108798313965164_2904942172107966680_nAbout the Author

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian)has been with the City of College Station since 2010. He previously served 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (Nov. 10)

2014 Council

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, Nov. 10. It’s not the official minutes.

The meeting is being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and streamed online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

5:46 p.m.

The workshop has started. Councilwoman Julie Schultz announced the following action taken in executive session:

“I move that the city manager is hereby authorized to settle the claim brought by Kathleen M. Ritch, individually and on behalf of Alannah Ritch and Andrew J. Ritch, in an amount not to exceed $250,000 and to execute a settlement and release containing terms as are customarily contained in settlement agreements.”

6;03 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled these consent items for workshop discussion:

  • Viasat Economic Development Agreement: The agreement provides for Viasat’s expansion into a new 85,000-square foot building on about nine acres in the Biocorridor. The company’s total investment is about $20 million with a minimum property valuation of $15 million by 2019. By the end of the second year following construction, Viasat will add at least 150 new full-time jobs with an average salary of $64,000 and the current payroll will increase by $9.6 million for a total of $17.2 million. In exchange, Viasat will receive an annual cash incentive for six years equal to the ad valorem taxes assessed and paid not to exceed $450,000. Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

  • Bee Creek Trunk Line Rehabilitation: The $4.6 million contract with Elliott Construction includes the installation of about 2,000 linear feet of 60-inch and 4,000 linear feet of 54-inch sanitary sewer main along Bee Creek from Carter’s Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant to west of State Highway 6. This contract is for the second of four phases to replace the Bee Creek Trunk Line that runs from Carters Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant to about 1,100 feet west of Jones Butler Road. Much of the existing trunk line was constructed in 1973 and was shown to have several surcharging line segments in the 2011 Wastewater Master Plan. The project will install a gravity line to increase the capacity of the trunk line to accept the anticipated build-out demand.
  • Utility Agreement with MUD No. 1: Approval of this item will modify the utility agreement with Brazos County Municipal Utility District No. 1 to include a surcharge for water and wastewater rates in the MUD without the charge of impact fees. It also specifies that city staff will recommend that the city council establish a Public Utility Corridor across Lick Creek Park for a sewer line to the Lick Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant. The diversion of parkland is on tonight’s regular agenda. The change would allow the Southern Pointe development to proceed. The surcharge would provide the same revenue as impact fees but would be spread over about 20 years. The PUC will have zero cost to the city.
  • Roadway Maintenance Fees: The results of the 2016 Citizen Survey suggested citizens prefer to see additional resources invested in the area of street maintenance. As part of the 2016 budget process, staff evaluated alternative sources to help fund the needed maintenance. After a detailed evaluation of various options, staff recommended implementing a roadway maintenance fee to be paid by citizens and businesses. The fees are based on reasonably equal shares in the total number of vehicle miles generated by all properties in the city limits and would be added to utility bills. The monthly fees would be $7.78 for single family, $6.10 for multi-family and a commercial range of $17.23 to $250. The fee would generate about $4.5 million per year. Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

 

6:33 p.m.

Pavement Standards

The council voted 4-3 for the city to use concrete in street construction rather than asphalt. Voting against the motion were Councilwoman Julie Schultz, and Councilmen Karl Mooney and Steve Aldrich. A study found that initial construction costs for rigid pavement were higher than for flexible pavement, while the maintenance and life cycle costs for rigid pavement were lower than for flexible pavement. 

An earlier motion to provide a combination of concrete and asphalt standards was defeated, 4-3. Mooney, Schultz, and Aldrich supported the motion.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

6:44 p.m.

Appraisal District Building

The council heard a presentation about the new office building proposed by the Brazos Central Appraisal District to address concerns with growth, security, customer service, and technology. Approval of the building is on tonight’s consent agenda.

The district’s board of directors has recommended building rather than leasing office space to give the property owners the best value for their tax dollars and to provide improved security, efficiency, and technology for staff and the public.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:12 p.m.

Itinerant Vendor Ordinance

The consensus of the council was to move ahead with new requirements related to itinerant vendors. The changes would exempt mobile medical vendors that provide infusion therapy and would allow more days per year for tent sales. 

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

7:12 p.m.

The mayor adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar, future agenda items, and committee reports. The regular meeting will start after a short break.

7:25 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

7:37 p.m.

Hear Visitors

Two people spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens may address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda.

  • Councilwoman Julie Schultz, speaking as a citizen, thanked Mayor Nancy Berry for her service to the community. Berry has been mayor since May 2010 and is presiding over her final council meeting tonight. She will hand the gavel to Mayor-elect Karl Mooney at the Nov. 21 council meeting.
  • Ben Roper recognized Marine Lance Cpl. Shane L. Goldman as part of the Fallen Heroes Memorial program. The 20-year-old Orange native died April 5, 2004, from injuries received from hostile fire in Al Anbar Province, Iraq.
  • Cecelia Yip, Mike Green, and Matthew Fontaine spoke in support of pickleball and encouraged the city to provide adequate facilities for the sport.

7:40 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve these consent agenda items:

  • An economic development agreement with Viasat regarding nine acres on Health Science Center Parkway.
  • A $3 million contract with Saber Power Services to modify the ring bus and relocate transformer No. 2 at the Greens Prairie Substation.
  • A $4.6 million contract with Elliott Construction for Phase 2 of the Bee Creek Sanitary Sewer Trunk Line Rehabilitation.
  • An ordinance recognizing water and sewer utility rates and surcharges established by contract.
  • An amendment to an agreement with McAlister Opportunity Fund that designates an alternate fire station site.
  • Modified the utility agreement with Brazos County MUD No. 1 to include a surcharge for water and sewer service without the charge of impact fees and other related matters.
  • A contract not to exceed $7,880 with Sungard Public Sector for adding the roadway maintenance fee to accounts in the utility billing system.
  • A resolution authorizing banners for the annual Christmas Parade.
  • A resolution approving the purchase of property and construction of a new office building by the Brazos Central Appraisal District.

This item was voted on separately:

  • By a 6-1 vote, the council approved an ordinance approving a roadway maintenance fee to help fund maintenance of city streets. Councilmen James Benham voted against the motion

Note: An inter-local agreement with Brazos County creating an economic development program was pulled from tonight’s agenda.

8:29 p.m.

Parking Removal near Fire Station No. 6

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to remove parking on one side of the streets in the neighborhood behind Fire Station No. 6. Affected streets are Payton, Banks, Pearce, Columbus, Preston, Churchill, Chappel, Pasler, Turner and Avenue B. The change was recommended to allow adequate access for emergency vehicles.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

 8:32 p.m.

Design Review Board Membership

After a public hearing, the council unanimously approved changes to membership qualifications for the Design Review Board, which is responsible for considering requests largely related to subjective matters such as alternative buffer standards and site plan design in the Wolf Pen Creek zoning district. The changes address concerns about the challenges of making appointments to the board.

The city’s Unified Development Ordinance defines membership criteria of appointees so that expertise is balanced between those with business acuity, personal experience in a design district, and general public opinion.

8:34 p.m.

Drainage Easement Abandonment

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to abandon a small public drainage easement at Holleman Drive South and Market Street to accommodate the recent development of The Junction, a multi-family project.  The property owner will maintain the existing drainage area and infrastructure.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:42 p.m.

Utility Corridor in Lick Creek Park

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to establish a public utility corridor across Lick Creek Park needed for the development of Brazos County Municipal Utility District  No. 1, also known as Southern Pointe. Since the park lies directly between Southern Pointe and the Lick Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant, the route is the only feasible option.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

8:42 p.m.

The council is taking a short break.

8:51 p.m.

The meeting has resumed.

9:51 p.m.

Rezoning on Earl Rudder Freeway South

After a public hearing, the council voted 5-2 to deny a request to change the zoning from Suburban Commercial to Planned Development District for about seven acres north of Raintree Drive along Earl Rudder Freeway South. Mayor Berry and Councilwoman Schultz voted for the motion.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

10:06 p.m.

Roadway Impact Fees

After a public hearing, the council voted 6-1 to approve an ordinance implementing roadway impact fees on new development, effective Dec. 1. Councilman James Benham voted against the motion. The fees are estimated to generate about $12 million in the next decade to help fund the capital costs of new roads needed to accommodate the city’s growth.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

10:17 p.m.

College Hills Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council unanimously approved a request to change the zoning from General Suburban to General Commercial for about 1.2 acres on George Bush Drive East in the College Hills Estates. The change will allow for commercial redevelopment opportunities.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation:

10:17 p.m.

Before adjourning, Mayor Berry noted it was her final council meeting. She thanked her fellow council members and city staff for the positive working relationship they’ve had since she was first elected in My 2010.

The council meets again on Monday, Nov. 21.


14316755_10108798313965164_2904942172107966680_nAbout the Author

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian)has been with the City of College Station since 2010. He previously served 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

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By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (5:30 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:

  1. Itinerant Vendor Ordinance: In the workshop, the council will discuss an itinerant vendor ordinance and requirements related to temporary outdoor sales, including mobile medical uses.
  2. Bee Creek Sewer Line: As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider a $4.6 million contract with Elliott Construction for the second of four phases of the rehabilitation of the Bee Creek Sanitary Sewer Trunk Line. The project will increase the system’s capacity to accept maximum demand at eventual build-out.
  3. Roadway Maintenance Fees: Also on the consent agenda are roadway maintenance fees dedicated to the repair and upkeep of city streets. The proposed monthly fees would be added to utility bills are $7.78 for single family, $6.10 for multi-family, and commercial fees ranging from $17.23-$250. The fees are expected to generate about $4.5 million per year.
  4. Parking Removal: After a public hearing, the council will consider removing parking on Avenue B and Payton, Banks, Pearce, Columbus, Preston, Churchill, Chappel, Pasler and Turner streets. The change would allow access for emergency vehicles.
  5. Roadway Impact Fees: After a public hearing, the council will consider approving roadway impact fees on new development to help pay the costs of building new roadways. The fees would be phased in starting in December 2017 and would in generate about $12 million in the next decade.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Ch. 19, or online. The website includes an archive of previous council meetings. We’ll post a detailed live blog on this site.

Related links:                                                                 

 


14316755_10108798313965164_2904942172107966680_nAbout the Author

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian)has been with the City of College Station since 2010. He previously served 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (5:30 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:

  1. Water Conservation Efforts: The council will hear a workshop presentation about the city’s water conservation programs.
  2. Northeast Sewer Trunk Line: As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider a $580,000 contract for design and construction services for Phase I of the Northeast Trunk Line Project and a preliminary engineering report for future phases.
  3. Game Day Traffic Control Agreement: The consent agenda also includes a five-year inter-local agreement with Texas A&M to share the deployment costs of traffic control devices. The expected maximum annual reimbursement from the university is $57,000.
  4. Rezoning Near The Science Park: After a pair of public hearings, the council will consider a request to change the land use and zoning designations for about 14 acres along the Rudder Freeway frontage road near The Science Park. The changes will allow for commercial development.
  5. Horseback Court Rezoning: The council will consider a request to change to zoning from Rural to Restricted Commercial and Natural Areas Protected for about 13 acres at 2744 Horseback Court.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Ch. 19, or online. The website includes an archive of previous council meetings. We’ll post a detailed live blog on this site.

Related Links:                                                                 

 


Colin KillianAbout the Author

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian)has been with the City of College Station since 2010. He previously served 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (5:30 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:

  1. Boswell Street Changes: The council will consider consent agenda items to make Boswell Street one-way all the time and to remove stopping standing and parking along Boswell and Langford Street near South Knoll Elementary School.
  2. Lick Creek Trunk Line: The council will consider a $1.38 million contract for the design and construction of a sewer trunk line to serve the Lick Creek sewer shed.
  3. Impact Fees Public Hearings: The council will consider setting Sept. 8 as the second public hearing date regarding the possible imposition of water, wastewater and roadway impact fees on new development.
  4. Special City Council Election: The council will consider authorizing a general election for Nov. 8 to elect a mayor and Place 2 city councilmember, and a special election to fill the remaining two years for Place 4 and one year for Place 3. Place 4 Councilman John Nichols and Place 3 Councilman Karl Mooney are running for mayor and must surrender their current seats in November.
  5. Budget Amendment: The council will consider a $628,873 budget amendment and interdepartmental contingency transfers of $378,266. For items included in the amendment, see pages 187-189 of the regular meeting packet.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Ch. 19, or online. The website includes an archive of previous council meetings. We’ll post a detailed live blog on this site.

Related Links                                                                 


Colin KillianAbout the Author

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian)has been with the City of College Station since 2010. He previously served 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


 

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Live Blog: Thursday’s city council meetings (June 9)

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By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

Welcome to our live blog from the College Station City Council’s workshop and regular meetings on Thursday, June 9. It’s not the official minutes.

The meeting is being broadcast live on Suddenlink Channel 19 and streamed online. An archive of previous council meetings is available on the website.

Many of the items on tonight’s agenda were carried over from the scheduled May 26 meeting, which was cancelled because of hazardous weather.

3:35 p.m.

The workshop has started.

4:49 p.m.

Pavement Standards

The council heard a presentation by Public Works Director Donald Harmon about pavement standards for city streets and roads. Harmon said asphalt pavement is cheaper in the short run, but concrete is easier to maintain and could be a more cost-effective option in the long term.

Council asked staff to come back with more information before it makes any decision.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation received by the council:

5:05 p.m.

Wastewater Capital Projects

The council is hearing a presentation from Water Services Director David Coleman about wastewater capital projects that are needed to stay ahead of development in the next decade.

Coleman said as the Wastewater Master Plan and the Impact Fee Study near completion, the picture is becoming clearer for what capital projects are required. He said the city is nearing capacity in its large trunk collection lines and treatment plants, which means a significant annual capital investment is necessary.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation received by the council:

5:05 p.m.

Executive Session

The council has gone into executive session. 

6:03 p.m.

The workshop has resumed.

6:27 p.m.

Joint Meeting with P&Z

The council conducted a joint meeting with the Planning & Zoning Commission to review the commission’s 2016 Plan of Work.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation received by the council:

6:42 p.m.

Consent Agenda Discussion

The council will vote on items listed on the consent agenda during tonight’s regular meeting. Councilmembers pulled these consent items for workshop discussion:

  • Public Urination Ordinance: The amendment to the city’s Code of Ordinances would help deter public urination and defecation, especially in the Northgate District.
  • Impact Fee Hearings: The resolutions set public hearings on roadway, water, and wastewater impact fees for the July 14 council meeting.
  • Food Establishment Sanitation: New state regulations render the city’s food establishment ordinances outdated. The amendments would reflect those changes.
  • Employee Health Clinic: The contract with CHI St. Joseph Health would open an exclusive health clinic to provide non-urgent care for city employees, dependents ages 5 and up, and retirees enrolled in the city’s Group Health Insurance Plan.

6:59 p.m.

The mayor adjourned the workshop after the council discussed its calendar, future agenda items, and committee reports. The regular meeting will start after a short break.

7:09 p.m.

The regular meeting has started.

7:16 p.m.

Hear Visitors

Two people spoke during Hear Visitors when citizens may address the council on any item that doesn’t appear on the posted agenda. 

  • Frank Duchmasclo provided the council with pictures of a senior center in Caldwell to show what Caldwell is doing for its senior citizens.
  • Ben Roper recognized Army Pfc. Ervin Dervishi as part of the Fallen Heroes Memorial program. The 21-year-old Fort Worth native died Jan. 24, 2004 when a rocket-propelled grenade hit his Bradley Fighting Vehicle in Baji, Iraq.

7:17 p.m.

Consent Agenda

The council voted unanimously to approve the entire consent agenda:

  • An ordinance amendment regarding public urination and defecation.
  • A grant application to the governor’s office for hotspot technology.
  • A $177,000 contract with Jones & Carter for the design, bidding, and construction phase services for Phases I and II of the State Highway 6 Waterline Project.
  • A $52,120 contract with Brown, Reynolds, Watford Architects for services related to the design of the traffic operations renovation as part of the ITS Master Plan Implementation project.
  • The $90,980 purchase of 10 traffic signal cabinets from Paradigm Traffic Systems to replace cabinets and provide functionalities with the new Intelligent Transportation System.
  • The Semi-Annual Report on Impact Fees.
  • A contract not to exceed $465,688.60 with CHI St. Joseph Health to provide employee health clinic services and operations management.
  • A negotiated settlement between the Atmos Cities Steering Committee and Atmos Energy Corp. (Mid-Tex Division) regarding the company’s rate review mechanism filings, and a settlement agreement on rate tariffs and proof of revenues.
  • Authorized the city manager to execute documents necessary for submitting the SWAT Night Vision Equipment Grant application for Criminal Justice Division funds from the Office of the Governor.
  • Set a public hearing for Thursday, July 14 at 7 p.m. at College Station City Hall to consider land use assumptions and capital improvement plan for roadway impact fees.
  • Set a public hearing date for Thursday, July 14 at 7 p.m. at College Station City Hall to consider land use assumptions and capital improvement plan for water and wastewater impact fees.
  • An inter-local agreement with Brazos County and the City of Bryan to apply for and accept a Justice Assistance Grant from the U.S. Department of Justice.
  • Renewal of the annual city-wide land surveying services and civil engineering services contracts with Joe Orr and Binkley & Barfield for a total of $100,000.
  • A five-year lease agreement estimated at $198,456 annually with Texas Commercial Waste for refuse containers.
  • A signal interconnect agreement with Union Pacific Railroad to allow the City of College Station to construct, maintain and operate a new signal facility at Greens Prairie Trail’s at-grade road crossing intersection.
  • An $80,000 bid award to GDS Associates for electric NERC compliance consulting services.
  • A $465,457.05 bid award for annual price agreements for various electrical items to be stored in inventory: KBS Electric Distributors ($97,493), Stuart C. Irby ($31,802), Graybar Electric ($55,135.30), Techline, Inc. ($244,126.75), and Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories Inc. ($36,900).
  • A bid award of $94,422 for the purchase of three 145kV potential transformers and three outdoor breakers to be maintained in electrical inventory and expended as needed.
  • A bid award of $290,356.14 for annual price agreements for electric meters and sockets to be stored in inventory: Priester-Mell & Nicholson ($160,891.14), KBS Electrical Distributors ($12,465), and Anixter ($117,000).
  • A resolution amending the authorized representatives on the local government pool account, TexPool.
  • A resolution amending the authorized representatives on the local government pool account, Texas Short Term Asset Reserve.
  • Updated the city’s food establishment ordinances to reflect new state regulations.

7:18 p.m.

Easement Abandonment on Holden Circle

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to abandon a public utility easement at 4928 Holden Circle to allow for development.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation received by the council:

7:59 p.m.

Municipal Utility District Consent

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to grant conditional consent to form up to five municipal utility districts in the City’s Extraterritorial Jurisdiction, generally located along Peach Creek between FM 2154 and State Highway 6 South.

The proposed MUDs will develop, operate, maintain, and issue bonds for financing the construction of needed infrastructure for the districts and levy and assess a tax on property within the districts to pay associated operational and maintenance expenses.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation received by the council:

8:12 p.m.

Crossroads Self Storage Land Use

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the future land use from Restricted Suburban to General Commercial and Suburban Commercial for about nine acres near the intersection of Wellborn Road and Greens Prairie Trail.

Crossroads Self Storage is located on the property, and the amendment generally allows commercial uses that cater to nearby residents and the larger community.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation received by the council:

8:15 p.m.

Crossroads Self Storage Rezoning

After a public hearing, the council voted unanimously to approve a request to change the zoning from Rural to Planned Development District for about nine acres near the intersection of Wellborn Road and Greens Prairie Trail.

Here’s the PowerPoint presentation received by the council:

8:15 p.m.

The mayor adjourned the meeting. The council meets again on Thursday, June 23.


Colin KillianAbout the Author

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian)has been with the City of College Station since 2010. He previously served 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


If you found value in this blog post, please share it with your social network and friends!


5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (3:30 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:

  1. Pavement Standards: The council will hear a workshop presentation on pavement standards for the city’s streets and roads.
  2. Wastewater Capital Improvements: The council will discuss wastewater system capital projects that are needed to stay ahead of development. The city’s collection lines and treatment plants are nearing capacity.
  3. Joint Meeting with P&Z: The council will have a joint workshop meeting with the Planning & Zoning Commission to discuss the commission’s 2016 Plan of Work. This part of the workshop is scheduled to start between 5:30-6 p.m.
  4. Employee Health Clinic: The council will consider a contract with CHI St. Joseph Health to operate an employee health clinic to provide non-urgent care for employees, dependents (ages 5 and up) and retirees enrolled in the city’s Group Health Insurance Plan.
  5. Municipal Utility Districts: After a public hearing, the council will consider granting conditional consent to a developer’s request to form up to five Municipal Utility Districts in the city’s extraterritorial jurisdiction. The proposed MUDs would finance needed infrastructure by assessing a tax on properties within the districts.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Ch. 19, or online. The website includes an archive of previous council meetings. We’ll post a detailed live blog on this site.

Related links:                                                                 


Colin KillianAbout the Author

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian)has been with the City of College Station since 2010. He previously served 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


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5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

UPDATE (5/26/16, 4:30 p.m.) Due to hazardous weather conditions, Thursday’s meetings have been cancelled.

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (about 5:30 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:

  1. Wastewater Capital Improvements: In the workshop, the council will discuss wastewater system capital projects the city needs to stay ahead of development. Our collection lines
    and treatment plants are nearing capacity.
  2. Pavement Standards: The council will hear a presentation on pavement standards for our streets and roads.
  3. Public Urination Ordinance: As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider an amendment to the Code of Ordinances to help deter public urination and defecation.
  4. Highway 6 Waterline Projects: The council will consider a contract for design, bidding and construction phase services for Phase I and II of the State Highway 6 Waterline Project. The lines will serve future development south of Fitch Parkway.
  5. Holleman Drive South Rezoning: After a public hearing, the council will consider a request to rezone about 14 acres south of Cain Road between Holleman Drive and Old Wellborn Road. The change will allow the development of townhomes.

The meetings can be watched live on Suddenlink Ch. 19, or online, where you can also find an archive of previous meetings. We’ll post a detailed live blog on this site.

Related links:                                                                 


Colin KillianAbout the Author

Colin Killian (@ColinKillian)has been with the City of College Station since 2010. He previously served 23 years as associate media relations director for the Texas A&M Athletics Department. Killian has also done extensive volunteer work for the U.S. Olympic Committee and worked as a reporter and editor for the Corpus Christi Caller-Times and Lewisville News. A native of Hobbs, N.M., he graduated from Texas Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism/political science.


If you found value in this blog post, please share it with your social network and friends!

 


5 things to watch at Thursday’s city council meetings

By Colin Killian, Public Communications Manager

The College Station City Council gathers Thursday at city hall for its workshop (about 5:30 p.m.) and regular (7 p.m.) meetings. Here are five items to watch:

  1. Affordable Housing Tax Credit: In the workshop, the council will discuss a proposal to develop affordable housing through the state’s low-income housing tax credit process. The presentation will include an overview of the rental housing market and the need for more affordable units.
  2. Private Sewer Line Inspections: The council will hear a presentation on enabling the inspection of private sewer lines and requiring repairs to help prevent wastewater overflows during heavy rains. In older parts of the city, the joints of clay lines can pull apart, and the lines are susceptible to cracking.
  3. Capital Plan Update: The council will be updated on the Capital Improvement Plan.
  4. Police Station Planning: The council will discuss the city’s next police facility, including space planning, possible sites, design schedule and budget.
  5. Open Carry at City Meetings: As part of the consent agenda, the council will consider prohibiting the open carry of handguns at meetings of city governmental entities, including council meetings.

(more…)